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Natural Rights, Morality, and the Law

DOI: 10.4236/blr.2011.21004, PP. 25-31

Keywords: Rights, Justice, Law, Reasonableness

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Abstract:

It is argued that despite attempts to discount the importance of natural rights for morality, they are fundamental to it; therefore, so too are natural rights to the legitimacy of the law.

References

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