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Health  2010 

An exploratory study on perceived relationship of alcohol, caffeine, and physical activity on hot flashes in menopausal women

DOI: 10.4236/health.2010.29146, PP. 989-996

Keywords: Hot Flashes, Caffeine, Alcohol, Physical Activity

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Abstract:

This study examined the effects of caffeine, alcohol, and physical activity (PA) on the perceived frequency and severity of hot flashes in menopausal women. Female employees at a Mid-Western university were invited to participate in an on-line survey. The 26-itemized Wo- men’s Health Survey (WHS) included questions regarding demographics, menopausal stage, experience of hot flashes, consumption of caffeinated beverages and alcohol, and participation in PA. One-hundred and ninety-six women completed the study. Ordinary Least Squares regressions revealed PA, caffeine, and alcohol intake were significant in predicting the severity of hot flashes (R2 = 0.068, F(6,180) = 2.195, p = 0.046), though they did not predict frequency of hot flashes (R2 = 0.043, F(6,184) = 1.39, p = 0.221). Participation in aerobic PA increased frequency of hot flashes (p = 0.031); while higher intensity of aerobic PA had an inverse relationship on both frequency and severity of hot flashes (p = 0.011, p = 0.003, respectively). Spearman correlations demonstrated a positive relationship between caffeinated soda intake and frequency (r = 0.17, p = 0.06) and severity (r = 0.19, p = 0.04) of hot flashes. Beverage consumption and PA may predict severity of hot flashes in women. Less frequent, higher intensity aerobic PA may lead to fewer, less severe hot flashes.

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