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Downregulation of miR-17~92 Expression Increase Paclitaxel Sensitivity in Human Ovarian Carcinoma SKOV3-TR30 Cells via BIM Instead of PTEN

DOI: 10.3390/ijms14023802

Keywords: miR-17~92 cluster, transduction, ovarian carcinoma, paclitaxel resistance, PTEN, BIM

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Abstract:

To better understand the molecular mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance in ovarian carcinoma, we evaluated the expression of miRNAs using miRNA microarray between human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells and paclitaxel resistant SKOV3-TR30 cells. Results showed that 69 miRNAs were upregulated while 102 miRNAs were downregulated in SKOV3-TR30 cells. Using real-time PCR, we further clarified that miR-17~92 was overexpressed in SKOV3-TR30 cells compared with that in SKOV3 cells. We then established stable virally transduced SKOV3-TR30-m-PTIP-Sponge all SKOV3-TR30 cells and its vector-only control SKOV3-TR30-m-PTIP-GFP cells. Real time-PCR revealed that SKOV3-TR30-m-PTIP-Sponge all cells expressed approximately 6.18-fold lower levels of miR-17~92 compared with the control group. Decreased expression of miR-17~92 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and growth inhibition. After the transduction, the BIM protein level was increased in SKOV3-TR30 cells and luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-17~92 binds directly to the 3'-UTR of BIM. Results of luciferase reporter assays accompanied with Western Blot showed that although miR-17~92 binds directly to the 3'-UTR of PTEN, the PTEN protein expression level was upregulated slightly while the result is of no statistical significance. Our results showed that miR-17~92 could be a causal factor of the downregulation of BIM in SKOV3-TR30 cells and thus induce the paclitaxel resistance in SKOV3-TR30 cells.

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