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Search Results: 1 - 7 of 7 matches for " anthroposophy "
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Pain and disease according to integral anthroposophical dentistry
Célia Regina Lulo Galitesi,Flaviana Bombarda de Andrade,Ana Flávia Sanches Borges
Brazilian Oral Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/s1806-83242012000700009
Abstract: From an academic standpoint, the university format, in general, has been nurturing a "paradigm of expertise" and, consequently, the relationship between specialties has declined. The upshot is that recent college dental graduates have adopted a clinical performance focusing on system parts and their specificities, in detriment to a more comprehensive view of the mouth and of the patient as a whole, with his/her vital, emotional and individual attributes. An interaction between the several different areas of human knowledge is needed imminently to decrease the dichotomy in professional behavior, because the demand for professionals and dental patients interested in a more comprehensive approach are increasing day by day. Patients want to know: "What, in fact, is behind the etiological extrinsic and intrinsic factors that maintain neuropathic pain, recurrent thrush, or persistent halitosis," among other questions, "even under the care of a dentist?" or "Why is this disease affecting me?" There are several issues composing the paradigm of salutogenesis: What are the essential aspects that constitute a healthy individual, overlapping the usual investigation: How to destroy, avoid and quell the pathological agents? A proposed approach is based on salutogenesis, which examines such issues. According to this approach, anthroposophical dentistry includes determinant factors, determinants of health, basic research and the development of oral health promotion, thus connecting dental academia with integrative thinking, while also complementing and gathering information that subsidizes basic research with the primordial concepts on laws governing the parameters involved in the vital processes of nature.
THE WALDORF - PEDAGOGY AND CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Lena DAMOVSKA
Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation , 2005,
Abstract: In the first half of the 20th century, with the opening of the first Waldorf School in 1919, Rudolph Steiner who is the ideological creator of the Waldorf pedagogy presented his own philosophy of education before the scholars. This was done by presenting a complete educational system designed for preschool, elementary school and high school children. To date, this educational model that is thought to be original by many of its characteristics, is successfully established and being practiced in many countries throughout the world. Within the framework of the Waldorf Pedagogy, children with special education needs are given the required attention and particularities that result from the needs of a concrete category of children are being respected.
Outcome of anthroposophic medication therapy in chronic disease: A 12-month prospective cohort study
Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Anja Glockmann, Renatus Ziegler, Gunver S Kienle et al
Drug Design, Development and Therapy , 2008, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S
Abstract: tcome of anthroposophic medication therapy in chronic disease: A 12-month prospective cohort study (3530) Total Article Views Authors: Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Anja Glockmann, Renatus Ziegler, Gunver S Kienle et al Published Date January 2008 Volume 2008:2 Pages 25 - 37 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S Harald J Hamre1, Claudia M Witt2, Anja Glockmann1, Renatus Ziegler3, Gunver S Kienle1, Stefan N Willich2, Helmut Kiene1 1Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; 3Society for Cancer Research, Arlesheim, Switzerland Background: Anthroposophic medications (AMED) are prescribed in 56 countries. Objective: To study clinical outcomes in patients prescribed AMED for chronic disease. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: 110 medical practices in Germany. Participants: 665 consecutive outpatients aged 1–71 years, prescribed AMED for mental, respiratory, musculoskeletal, neurological, genitourinary, and other chronic diseases. Main outcomes: Disease and Symptom Scores (physicians’ and patients’ assessment, 0–10) and SF-36. Results: During the first six months, an average of 1.5 AMED per patient was used, in total 652 different AMED. Origin of AMED was mineral (8.0% of 652 AMED), botanical (39.0%), zoological (7.2%), chemically defined (13.0%), and mixed (33.0%). From baseline to six-month follow-up, all outcomes improved significantly: Disease Score improved by mean 3.15 points (95% confidence interval 2.97–3.34, p 0.001), Symptom Score by 2.43 points (2.23–2.63, p 0.001), SF-36 Physical Component Summary by 3.04 points (2.16–3.91, p 0.001), and SF-36 Mental Component Summary by 5.75 points (4.59–6.92, p 0.001). All improvements were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Improvements were similar in adult men and women, in children, and in patients not using adjunctive therapies. Conclusion: Outpatients using AMED for chronic disease had long-term reduction of disease severity and improvement of quality of life.
Anthroposophic therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity: A two-year prospective study in outpatients
Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Gunver S Kienle, et al
International Journal of General Medicine , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S11725
Abstract: nthroposophic therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity: A two-year prospective study in outpatients Original Research (3843) Total Article Views Authors: Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Gunver S Kienle, et al Published Date August 2010 Volume 2010:3 Pages 239 - 253 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S11725 Harald J Hamre1, Claudia M Witt2, Gunver S Kienle1, Christoph Meinecke3, Anja Glockmann1, Renatus Ziegler4, Stefan N Willich2, Helmut Kiene1 1Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; 3Pediatric Consultant, Community Hospital Havelh he, Berlin, Germany; 4Society for Cancer Research, Arlesheim, Switzerland Background: Anthroposophic treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. Methods: We studied 61 consecutive children starting anthroposophic treatment for ADHD symptoms under routine outpatient conditions. Primary outcome was FBB-HKS (a parents’ questionnaire for ADHD core symptoms, 0–3), and secondary outcomes were disease and symptom scores (physicians’ and parents’ assessment, 0–10) and quality of life (KINDL total score, 0–100). Results: A total of 67% of patients fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for ADHD, 15% had an exclusion diagnosis such as pervasive developmental disorders, while 18% did not fulfill ADHD criteria for another reason. Anthroposophic treatment modalities used were eurythmy therapy (in 56% of patients), art therapy (20%), rhythmical massage therapy (8%), and medications (51%). From baseline to six-month follow-up, all outcomes improved significantly; average improvements were FBB-HKS total score 0.30 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18–0.43; P < 0.001), FBB-HKS inattention 0.36 (95% CI: 0.21–0.50; P < 0.001), FBB-HKS hyperactivity 0.29 (95% CI: 0.14–0.44; P < 0.001), FBB-HKS impulsivity 0.22 (95% CI: 0.03–0.40; P < 0.001), disease score 2.33 (95% CI: 1.84–2.82; P < 0.001), symptom score 1.66 (95% CI: 1.17–2.16; P < 0.001), and KINDL 5.37 (95% CI: 2.27–8.47; P = 0.001). Improvements were similar in patients not using stimulants (90% of patients at months 0–6) and were maintained until last follow-up after 24 months. Conclusion: Children with ADHD symptoms receiving anthroposophic treatment had -long-term improvement of symptoms and quality of life.
Long-term outcomes of anthroposophic therapy for chronic low back pain: A two-year follow-up analysis
Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Gunver S Kienle, Anja Glockmann, et al.
Journal of Pain Research , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S5922
Abstract: ng-term outcomes of anthroposophic therapy for chronic low back pain: A two-year follow-up analysis Original Research (5274) Total Article Views Authors: Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Gunver S Kienle, Anja Glockmann, et al. Published Date June 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 75 - 85 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S5922 Harald J Hamre1, Claudia M Witt2, Gunver S Kienle1, Anja Glockmann1, Renatus Ziegler3, Stefan N Willich2, Helmut Kiene1 1Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; 3Society for Cancer Research, Arlesheim, Switzerland Background: Anthroposophic treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP) includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. In a previously published prospective cohort study, anthroposophic treatment for chronic LBP was associated with improvements of pain, back function, and quality of life at 12-month follow-up. These improvements were at least comparable to improvements in a control group receiving conventional care. We conducted a two-year follow-up analysis of the anthroposophic therapy group with a larger sample size. Methods: Seventy-five consecutive adult outpatients in Germany, starting anthroposophic treatment for discogenic or non-specific LBP of ≥6 weeks’ duration participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire (HFAQ; 0–100), LBP Rating Scale Pain Score (LBPRS; 0–100), Symptom Score (0–10), and SF-36 after 24 months. Results: Eighty-five percent of patients were women. Mean age was 49.0 years. From baseline to 24-month follow-up all outcomes improved significantly; average improvements were: HFAQ 11.1 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.5–16.6; p < 0.001), LBPRS 8.7 (95% CI: 4.4–13.0; p < 0.001), Symptom Score 2.0 (95% CI: 1.3–2.8; p < 0.001), SF-36 Physical Component Summary 6.0 (95% CI: 2.9–9.1; p < 0.001), and SF-36 Mental Component Summary 4.0 (95% CI: 1.1–6.8; p = 0.007). Conclusion: Patients with chronic LBP receiving anthroposophic treatment had sustained improvements of symptoms, back function, and quality of life, suggesting that larger multicenter rigorous studies may be worthwhile.
Anthroposophic therapy for asthma: A two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings
Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Gunver S Kienle, et al
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S7184
Abstract: nthroposophic therapy for asthma: A two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings Original Research (5763) Total Article Views Authors: Harald J Hamre, Claudia M Witt, Gunver S Kienle, et al Published Date November 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 111 - 128 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S7184 Harald J Hamre1, Claudia M Witt2, Gunver S Kienle1, Christof Schnürer3, Anja Glockmann1, Renatus Ziegler4, Stefan N Willich2, Helmut Kiene1 1Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; 3Internal Medicine Practice, A Fraenkel Centrum, Badenweiler, Germany; 4Society for Cancer Research, Arlesheim, Switzerland Background: Anthroposophic treatment for asthma includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. Methods: We studied consecutive outpatients starting anthroposophic treatment for asthma under routine conditions in Germany. Main outcomes were average asthma severity (0–10, primary outcome); symptoms (1–4); and asthma-related quality of life at 12-month follow-up (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire [AQLQ] overall score, 1–7, for adults; KINDL Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents, asthma module, 0–100, for children) at 12-month follow-up. Results: Ninety patients (54 adults, 36 children) were included. Anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (88% of patients, n = 79/90); eurythmy therapy (22%); art therapy (10%); and rhythmical massage therapy (1%). Median number of eurythmy/art/massage sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10–20), median therapy duration was 120 days (84–184). From baseline to 12-month follow-up, all outcomes improved significantly (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Average improvements were: average asthma severity 2.61 points (95% confidence interval CI: 1.90–3.32); cough 0.93 (95% CI: 0.60–1.25); dyspnea 0.92 (95% CI: 0.56–1.28); exertion-induced symptoms 0.95 (95% CI: 0.64–1.25); frequency of asthma attacks 0.78 (95% CI:0.41–1.14); awakening from asthma 0.90 (95% CI: 0.58–1.21); AQLQ overall score 1.44 (95% CI:0.97–1.92); and KINDL asthma module 14.74 (95% CI: 9.70–19.78). All improvements were maintained until last follow-up after 24 months. Conclusions: Patients with asthma under anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvements of symptoms and quality of life.
The Secrets of Koberwitz: The Diffusion of Rudolf Steiner’s Agriculture Course and the Founding of Biodynamic Agriculture
John Paull
Journal of Social Research & Policy , 2011,
Abstract: Rudolf Steiner presented his Agriculture Course to a group of 111, farmers and others, at Koberwitz (Kobierzyce, Poland) in 1924. Steiner spoke of an agriculture to ‘heal the earth’ and he laid the philosophical and practical underpinnings for such a differentiated agriculture. Biodynamic agriculture is now practiced internationally as a specialist form of organic agriculture. The path from proposal to experimentation, to formalization, to implementation and promulgation played out over a decade and a half following the Course and in the absence of its progenitor. Archival material pertaining to the dissemination of the early printed editions of ‘The Agriculture Course’ reveals that within six years of the Course there was a team of more than 400 individuals of the Agricultural Experimental Circle (AEC), each signed a confidentiality agreement, and located throughout continental Europe, and also in Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, and USA. Membership expanded to over 1000 AEC members (with a lower bound estimate of 1144 members) who were committed to working collectively towards an evidence based, new and alternative agriculture, ‘for all farmers’, which was to be developed into a ‘suitable for publication’ form. That publication milestone was realized in 1938 with the release of Ehrenfried Pfeiffer’s ‘Bio-Dynamic Farming and Gardening’ which was published simultaneously in at least five languages: Dutch, English, French, German and Italian
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