oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 8 )

2018 ( 11 )

2017 ( 15 )

2016 ( 15 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 6799 matches for " Wilson NW "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /6799
Display every page Item
Sinusitis and chronic cough in children
Wilson NW,Hogan MB,Harper CB,Peele K
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2012,
Abstract: Nevin W Wilson, Mary Beth Hogan, Charles Bruce Harper, Kathy Peele, Sonia Budhecha, Vincent Loffredo, Vanessa WongUniversity of Nevada School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonology, Reno, NV, USABackground: Chronic cough in children is a common problem, and sinusitis is a common etiology. The diagnosis of sinusitis is often clinical, but confirmation is thought to require a CT scan due to the difficulty of interpreting a Water’s view sinus X-ray.Objectives: The purposes of the study were (1) to examine the frequency of an abnormal sinus X-ray in children with a chronic cough of more than 4 weeks duration; (2) to compare the interpretation of the sinus film between allergy/pulmonary clinicians and radiologists; and (3) to correlate symptoms with X-ray results.Methods: A chart review of 2- to 18-year-old patients with coughing exceeding 4 weeks was performed. Data was collected for patients who had received a Water’s view sinus film as part of their evaluation. Exam, X-ray results, and clinical outcomes were categorized and statistical analyses performed.Results: A total of 86 patients were included. Clinicians found that 65% of the children had positive Water’s view films, compared with the radiologist’s reading of 62% (non significant). Significant associations between post-tussive emesis (P = 0.01) and purulence (P = 0.03) were noted with a positive film. Positive sinus X-ray was highly associated with all findings except wheeze when present together (P < 0.001).Conclusions: Sinus abnormalities on X-ray are associated with prolonged cough in 65% of children. The Water’s view sinus film is a clinically useful screening tool for clinicians in the workup of chronic cough. Certain physical findings and clinical complaints, when present concurrently, correlate with the X-ray results.Keywords: Water’s view sinus X-ray, asthma, allergic rhinitis, radiologist, post-tussive emesis, wheezing
Sinusitis and chronic cough in children
Wilson NW, Hogan MB, Harper CB, Peele K, Budhecha S, Loffredo V, Wong V
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S31874
Abstract: usitis and chronic cough in children Original Research (2349) Total Article Views Authors: Wilson NW, Hogan MB, Harper CB, Peele K, Budhecha S, Loffredo V, Wong V Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 27 - 32 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S31874 Received: 17 March 2012 Accepted: 18 April 2012 Published: 30 July 2012 Nevin W Wilson, Mary Beth Hogan, Charles Bruce Harper, Kathy Peele, Sonia Budhecha, Vincent Loffredo, Vanessa Wong University of Nevada School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonology, Reno, NV, USA Background: Chronic cough in children is a common problem, and sinusitis is a common etiology. The diagnosis of sinusitis is often clinical, but confirmation is thought to require a CT scan due to the difficulty of interpreting a Water’s view sinus X-ray. Objectives: The purposes of the study were (1) to examine the frequency of an abnormal sinus X-ray in children with a chronic cough of more than 4 weeks duration; (2) to compare the interpretation of the sinus film between allergy/pulmonary clinicians and radiologists; and (3) to correlate symptoms with X-ray results. Methods: A chart review of 2- to 18-year-old patients with coughing exceeding 4 weeks was performed. Data was collected for patients who had received a Water’s view sinus film as part of their evaluation. Exam, X-ray results, and clinical outcomes were categorized and statistical analyses performed. Results: A total of 86 patients were included. Clinicians found that 65% of the children had positive Water’s view films, compared with the radiologist’s reading of 62% (non significant). Significant associations between post-tussive emesis (P = 0.01) and purulence (P = 0.03) were noted with a positive film. Positive sinus X-ray was highly associated with all findings except wheeze when present together (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Sinus abnormalities on X-ray are associated with prolonged cough in 65% of children. The Water’s view sinus film is a clinically useful screening tool for clinicians in the workup of chronic cough. Certain physical findings and clinical complaints, when present concurrently, correlate with the X-ray results.
Disease Review: Dianosis and treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis
NW Schluger
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine , 2008,
Abstract: No
The epidemiology and treatment of gout
McGill NW
Open Access Rheumatology: Research and Reviews , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OARRR.S10313
Abstract: emiology and treatment of gout Review (3467) Total Article Views Authors: McGill NW Published Date December 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 73 - 82 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OARRR.S10313 Neil W McGill Institute of Rheumatology and Orthopaedics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, Australia Abstract: The development and expression of gout depends on three key steps: (1) chronic hyperuricemia, (2) the growth of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, and (3) interaction between MSU crystals and the inflammatory system. Epidemiological studies have continued to improve our understanding of the environmental and genetic factors which influence chronic hyperuricemia and gout. The influence of obesity, alcohol, race, sex, age, and specific dietary components will be discussed below. The primary mechanism of hyperuricemia is insufficient renal clearance of uric acid which in turn is dependent on transport of uric acid in the proximal renal tubule. Knowledge of the transport mechanisms has improved understanding of the genetic influences on gout and is relevant to understanding of the effects of drugs which can increase or decrease renal uric acid clearance. The application of established principles of management including diagnosis through crystal identification, the gradual introduction of hypouricemic therapy with the use of prophylaxis to reduce the risk of flares, identification of a suitably low target of plasma urate, a progressive increase in therapy to achieve the target and taking steps to encourage good compliance, has the potential to improve outcomes for patients with this very common affliction. The potential role for new therapies will also be discussed.
The epidemiology and treatment of gout
McGill NW
Open Access Rheumatology: Research and Reviews , 2011,
Abstract: Neil W McGillInstitute of Rheumatology and Orthopaedics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: The development and expression of gout depends on three key steps: (1) chronic hyperuricemia, (2) the growth of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, and (3) interaction between MSU crystals and the inflammatory system. Epidemiological studies have continued to improve our understanding of the environmental and genetic factors which influence chronic hyperuricemia and gout. The influence of obesity, alcohol, race, sex, age, and specific dietary components will be discussed below. The primary mechanism of hyperuricemia is insufficient renal clearance of uric acid which in turn is dependent on transport of uric acid in the proximal renal tubule. Knowledge of the transport mechanisms has improved understanding of the genetic influences on gout and is relevant to understanding of the effects of drugs which can increase or decrease renal uric acid clearance. The application of established principles of management including diagnosis through crystal identification, the gradual introduction of hypouricemic therapy with the use of prophylaxis to reduce the risk of flares, identification of a suitably low target of plasma urate, a progressive increase in therapy to achieve the target and taking steps to encourage good compliance, has the potential to improve outcomes for patients with this very common affliction. The potential role for new therapies will also be discussed.Keywords: gout, hyperuricemia, allopurinol, febuxostat, lesinurad, pegloticase
Rationale for Lymph Node Dissection in Testis Cancer
Clarke NW
Journal für Urologie und Urogyn?kologie , 2010,
Abstract:
Extent of Lymphadenectomy in Prostate Cancer
Clarke NW
Journal für Urologie und Urogyn?kologie , 2010,
Abstract:
Lymph Node Management in Penis Cancer
Clarke NW
Journal für Urologie und Urogyn?kologie , 2010,
Abstract:
Persistence of Features of Traditional Healing in the Churches in Africa: The Case of the Akurinu Churches in Kenya
NW Ndung’u
Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya , 2009,
Abstract: One of the attractions of new converts from mainline churches to the African Instituted Churches (AICs) is faith healing. Healing understood in its wider sense as the restoration of the wholeness of life is not new to African communities, since they practiced it long before the coming of Christianity into their continent. This article examines some features of traditional healing which are manifested in faith healing in the AICs. The persistence of these features pauses a challenge to mainline churches in Africa, forcing them to rethink their approach to life threatening issues such as witchcraft and barrenness that continue to preoccupy many of their adherents.
An investigation into the food and feeding ecology of a potential aquaculture candidate, Sarotherodon galilaeus multifasciatus in a meteoritic crater lake in Ghana
S Amisah, NW Agbo
Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management , 2008,
Abstract: An investigation into the food and feeding ecology of the cichlid, Sarotherodon galilaeus multifasciatus in a tropical meteoritic lake in Ghana was undertaken. Stomachs of the fishes, at two length classes, representing adults and juveniles, were examined and the food items identified. The juveniles of Sarotherodon galilaeus multifasciatus feed mainly on insect and insect larvae and relatively small quantities of diatoms but avoiding macrophytes. A striking feature in the composition of juvenile diet was the considerable quantities of ingested sand, which constituted about 16% of stomach contents. Ingested sand may be helpful in maceration of food in the pyloric stomach. A sandy substratum may, therefore, appear ecologically important for juveniles of the species. Adult stomachs contained mainly phytoplankton, chironomid and insect larvae with no ingested sand. No significant differences were found in the stomach contents of the fishes for the dry and wet seasons due, partly, to the lack of any considerable seasonal differences in allochthonous inputs into the lake waters. The fishes exploit a wide range of food resources in the open, sub-littoral and littoral zones of the lake. Further studies to include growth and recruitment are recommended to enhance future production of the species under culture conditions .
Page 1 /6799
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.