oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 45 matches for " Wheaton Hinchion "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /45
Display every page Item
Clinical Experience of Auditory Brainstem Response Testing on Pediatric Patients in the Operating Room
Guangwei Zhou,Briana Dornan,Wheaton Hinchion
International Journal of Otolaryngology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/350437
Abstract: Objectives. To review our experience of conducting auditory brainstem response (ABR) test on children in the operating room and discuss the benefits versus limitations of this practice. Methods. Retrospective review study conducted in a pediatric tertiary care facility. A total of 267 patients identified with usable data, including ABR results, medical and surgical notes, and follow-up evaluation. Results. Hearing status successfully determined in all patients based on the ABR results form the operating room. The degrees and the types of hearing loss also documented in most of the cases. In addition, multiple factors that may affect the outcomes of ABR in the operating room identified. Conclusions. Hearing loss in children with complicated medical issues can be accurately evaluated via ABR testing in the operating room. Efforts should be made to eliminate adverse factors to ABR recording, and caution should be taken when interpreting ABR results from the operating room.
Clinical Experience of Auditory Brainstem Response Testing on Pediatric Patients in the Operating Room
Guangwei Zhou,Briana Dornan,Wheaton Hinchion
International Journal of Otolaryngology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/350437
Abstract: Objectives. To review our experience of conducting auditory brainstem response (ABR) test on children in the operating room and discuss the benefits versus limitations of this practice. Methods. Retrospective review study conducted in a pediatric tertiary care facility. A total of 267 patients identified with usable data, including ABR results, medical and surgical notes, and follow-up evaluation. Results. Hearing status successfully determined in all patients based on the ABR results form the operating room. The degrees and the types of hearing loss also documented in most of the cases. In addition, multiple factors that may affect the outcomes of ABR in the operating room identified. Conclusions. Hearing loss in children with complicated medical issues can be accurately evaluated via ABR testing in the operating room. Efforts should be made to eliminate adverse factors to ABR recording, and caution should be taken when interpreting ABR results from the operating room. 1. Introduction About 2 to 3 of every 1000 children are identified with hearing loss at birth each year in the United States, and hearing impairment is, in fact, the most common sensory deficit in the pediatric population [1–4]. Late-onset hearing loss or acquired hearing loss, in addition to congenital hearing loss, is prevalent as well in young children. For example, hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion (OME) can be seen in 15–40% of children under 5 years [5]. Since hearing impairment in early childhood can cause significant delays in speech/language developments, early identification and diagnosis of hearing loss become the initial and a critical step for proper treatment and habilitation, regardless of the etiology or the severity of the hearing loss. In clinical audiology, behavioral hearing evaluation is considered the “gold standard” for evaluating hearing sensitivity in the pediatric population. During a hearing evaluation, audiologists typically use visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA), conditioned play audiometry (CPA), or conventional pure-tone audiometry to test children’s hearing. The technique chosen by an audiologist for a specific child is usually dependent upon the child’s age and the child’s developmental skill level. Due to developmental and physical limitations, behavioral hearing test such as VRA is not possible for any young children under six months of age. Therefore, an electrophysiology-based hearing evaluation such as the Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR) test becomes the obvious choice for this population. It can be very difficult, if not
Statistical Ensembles With Finite Bath: A Description for an Event Generator
M. Hauer,S. Wheaton
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.80.054915
Abstract: A Monte Carlo event generator has been developed assuming thermal production of hadrons. The system under consideration is sampled grand canonically in the Boltzmann approximation. A re-weighting scheme is then introduced to account for conservation of charges (baryon number, strangeness, electric charge) and energy and momentum, effectively allowing for extrapolation of grand canonical results to the microcanonical limit. This method has two strong advantages compared to analytical approaches and standard microcanonical Monte Carlo techniques, in that it is capable of handling resonance decays as well as (very) large system sizes.
Castleman Disease: An Unexpected Cause of a Solitary Pleural Mass
Fiachra Moloney,Maria Twomey,John Hinchion,Michael Maher
Case Reports in Radiology , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/130515
Abstract: Castleman disease (CD) is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, the etiology of which is unclear. Clinically it may manifest as localized disease (unicentric) or disseminated disease (multicentric). CD occurs in the thorax in 70% of cases, abdomen and pelvis in 15%, and in the neck in 10–15% of cases. We present a case of a pleural mass located posteriorly in a paraspinal location, which was discovered incidentally in a 50-year-old man and was subsequently resected followed by an unexpected diagnosis of Castleman disease on histological examination. In this report, we review the clinical and histological findings in a rare presentation of Castleman disease and discuss the findings in this case as part of an overall review of the typical radiological findings seen in Castleman disease. 1. Introduction Castleman disease (CD), also known as angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia or giant lymph node hyperplasia, is an uncommon nonmalignant lymphoproliferative disorder first described by Benjamin Castleman in 1954 [1]. It can occur at any age with a peak incidence in the third and fourth decades. CD occurs in the thorax in 70% of cases, abdomen and pelvis in 15%, and in the neck in 10–15% of cases [2]. Clinically, it may manifest as localized disease (unicentric) or widespread disease (multicentric) and histologically it is classified as hyaline vascular, plasmacytic, or mixed cellularity type disease. We report a rare presentation of unicentric Castleman disease, which presented as a pleural mass, located in a paraspinal location in an asymptomatic 50-year-old male patient. 2. Case Report A 50-year-old male patient was found to have a mediastinal mass on a chest radiograph performed prior to surgical repair of a tibial fracture. He was asymptomatic and a nonsmoker. His past medical history was unremarkable. Physical examination of the cardiorespiratory system was normal. A full blood count and biochemical profile were normal. Chest radiograph demonstrated a 5?cm left-sided pleural or mediastinal mass (see Figure 1). Figure 1: Chest radiograph in a 50-year-old male patient with Castleman disease. A soft tissue pleural-based mass is seen superior to the left hilum (arrow). A chest CT, with intravenous contrast, demonstrated a homogenously enhancing, well-circumscribed, lobulated pleural mass located posteriorly in a left paraspinal location adjacent to the descending thoracic aorta. There was no invasion of local tissues or widening of the adjacent neural foramina (see Figure 2). On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion was found to be slightly
THE CHEAP HO VS. THE GIRL NEXT DOOR: THE PROSTITUTION PARADIGM VS. THE SEX TRAFFICKING PARADIGM
Edward J. Schauer,Elizabeth M. Wheaton
Archivos de Criminología, Criminalística y Seguridad Privada , 2008,
Abstract: The present interest in sex trafficking correlates with the white slavery moral panic of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Current knowledge of sex trafficking is limited by grossly inaccurate (probably inflated) statistics and by compromised definitions. Nevertheless, the United Nations and the United States have rushed to develop legal remedies -- remedies doomed to failure due to conflicting enforcement paradigms, due to increasingly lucrative underground economies, and due to the inaccurate definitions and descriptions of the issues. Trafficking definitions, measurements, and legal solutions derive from bipolar philosophical interest groups and differing international political agendas.
Teaching Bayesian Statistics To Intelligence Analysts: Lessons Learned
Kristan J. Wheaton,Jennifer Lee,Hemangni Deshmukh
Journal of Strategic Security , 2009,
Abstract: The Community must develop and integrate into regular use new tools that can assist analysts in filtering and correlating the vast quantities of information that threaten to overwhelm the analytic process…—Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States.Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction (The WMD Report)1Unlike the other social sciences and, particularly, the physical sciences, where scientists get to choose the questions they wish to answer and experiments are carefully designed to confirm or negate hypotheses, intelligence analysis requires analysts to deal with the demands of decision makers and estimate the intentions of foreign actors, criminals or business competitors in an environment filled with uncertainty and even deliberate deception.
Why is that Hammer in My Coffee? A Multimodal Imaging Investigation of Contextually Based Tool Understanding
J. C. Mizelle,Lewis A. Wheaton
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience , 2010, DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2010.00233
Abstract: Appropriate tool–object pairing is a natural part of our lives. When preparing to stir coffee, we know that a hammer is useful for some tasks but that it is not appropriate in this behavioral context. The neural correlates of this context–tool pairing process remain unclear. In the current work, we used event-related electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine neural correlates for differentiating contextually correct and incorrect tool use. Subjects were shown images depicting correct (e.g., spoon used to stir coffee) or incorrect (e.g., hammer used to stir coffee) tool use. We identified distinct regional and temporal activations for identifying incorrect versus correct tool use. The posterior cingulate, insula, and superior temporal gyrus preferentially differentiated incorrect tool–object usage, while occipital, parietal, and frontal areas were active in identifying correct tool use. Source localized EEG analysis confirmed the fMRI data and showed phases of activation, where incorrect tool-use activation (0–200 ms) preceded occipitotemporal activation for correct tool use (300–400 ms). This work extends our previous findings to better identify the neural substrate for contextual evaluation of tool use, and may contribute to our understanding of neurological disorders resulting in tool-use deficits.
Multiplicity Fluctuations and Correlations in Limited Momentum Space Bins in Relativistic Gases
Michael Hauer,Giorgio Torrieri,Spencer Wheaton
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.80.014907
Abstract: Multiplicity fluctuations and correlations are calculated within thermalized relativistic ideal quantum gases. These are shown to be sensitive to the choice of statistical ensemble as well as to the choice of acceptance window in momentum space. It is furthermore shown that global conservation laws introduce non-trivial correlations between disconnected regions in momentum space, even in the absence of any dynamics.
Gamma-Ray Spectra & Variability of the Crab Nebula Emission Observed by BATSE
J. C. Ling,Wm. A. Wheaton
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1086/378700
Abstract: We report ~ 600 days of BATSE earth-occultation observations of the total gamma-ray (30 keV to 1.7 MeV) emission from the Crab nebula, between 1991 May 24 (TJD 8400) and 1994 October 2 (TJD 9627). Lightcurves from 35-100, 100-200, 200-300, 300-400, 400-700, and 700-1000 keV, show that positive fluxes were detected by BATSE in each of these six energy bands at significances of approximately 31, 20, 9.2, 4.5, 2.6, and 1.3 sigma respectively per day. We also observed significant flux and spectral variations in the 35-300 keV energy region, with time scales of days to weeks. The spectra below 300 keV, averaged over typical CGRO viewing periods of 6-13 days, can be well described by a broken power law with average indices of ~ 2.1 and ~ 2.4 varying around a spectral break at ~ 100 keV. Above 300 keV, the long-term averaged spectra, averaged over three 400 d periods (TJD 8400-8800, 8800-9200, and 9200-9628, respectively) are well represented by the same power law with index of ~ 2.34 up to ~ 670 keV, plus a hard spectral component extending from ~ 670 keV to ~ 1.7 MeV, with a spectral index of ~ 1.75. The latter component could be related to a complex structure observed by COMPTEL in the 0.7-3 MeV range. Above 3 MeV, the extrapolation of the power-law continuum determined by the low-energy BATSE spectrum is consistent with fluxes measured by COMPTEL in the 3-25 MeV range, and by EGRET from 30-50 MeV. We interpret these results as synchrotron emission produced by the interaction of particles ejected from the pulsar with the field in different dynamical regions of the nebula system, as observed recently by HST, XMM-Newton, and Chandra.
Centrality Dependence of Thermal Parameters in Heavy-Ion Collisions at CERN-SPS
J. Cleymans,B. Kampfer,S. Wheaton
Physics , 2001, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.65.027901
Abstract: The centrality dependence of thermal parameters, characterizing the hadron multiplicities, is determined phenomenologically for lead-on-lead collisions at CERN-SPS for a beam energy of 158 AGeV. The strangeness equilibration factor shows a clear, approximately linear, increase with increasing centrality, while the freeze-out temperature and chemical potential remain constant.
Page 1 /45
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.