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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3741 matches for " Weiss Ellen "
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Combating HIV stigma in health care settings: what works?
Nyblade Laura,Stangl Anne,Weiss Ellen,Ashburn Kim
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1758-2652-12-15
Abstract: The purpose of this review paper is to provide information and guidance to those in the health care setting about why it is important to combat HIV-related stigma and how to successfully address its causes and consequences within health facilities. Research shows that stigma and discrimination in the health care setting and elsewhere contributes to keeping people, including health workers, from accessing HIV prevention, care and treatment services and adopting key preventive behaviours. Studies from different parts of the world reveal that there are three main immediately actionable causes of HIV-related stigma in health facilities: lack of awareness among health workers of what stigma looks like and why it is damaging; fear of casual contact stemming from incomplete knowledge about HIV transmission; and the association of HIV with improper or immoral behaviour. To combat stigma in health facilities, interventions must focus on the individual, environmental and policy levels. The paper argues that reducing stigma by working at all three levels is feasible and will likely result in long-lasting benefits for both health workers and HIV-positive patients. The existence of tested stigma-reduction tools and approaches has moved the field forward. What is needed now is the political will and resources to support and scale up stigma-reduction activities throughout health care settings globally.
Potential Markers of Aggressive Behavior: The Fear of Other Persons' Laughter and Its Overlaps with Mental Disorders
Elisabeth M. Weiss, Günter Schulter, H. Harald Freudenthaler, Ellen Hofer, Natascha Pichler, Ilona Papousek
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0038088
Abstract: Background Anecdotal evidence suggested that some outbreaks of aggression and violence may be related to a fear of being laughed at and ridiculed. The present study examined the potential association of the fear of other persons' laughter (gelotophobia) with emotion-related deficits predisposing for aggression, anger and aggression proneness, and its overlaps with relevant mental disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings Gelotophobic individuals were compared to a non-phobic control group with respect to emotion regulation skills and strategies, alexithymia, anger proneness, and aggressive behavior. Social phobia was diagnosed using the Structural Clinical Interview (SCID-I) for DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition). Additionally, the SCID-II modules for Cluster A Personality Disorders, which includes schizoid, paranoid, and schizotypal personality disorder were administered to all participants. The findings show that gelotophobia is associated with deficits in the typical handling of an individual's own affective states, greater anger proneness and more aggressive behavior according to self-report as compared to non-phobic individuals. 80% of the subjects in the gelotophobia group had an additional diagnosis of social phobia and/or Cluster A personality disorder. The additional diagnoses did not predict additional variance of anger or aggressive behavior as compared to gelotophobia alone. Conclusions/Significance Features related to aggression and violence that are inherent in mental disorders such as social phobia and Cluster A personality disorders may be particularly evident in the symptom of fear of other persons' laughter.
Passing the Buck, or Thinking about Experience? Conditions for Professional Development among Teachers in a Norwegian Middle School  [PDF]
Ellen Ramvi
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.52014
Abstract: This paper uses psychoanalytic ideas to explore obstacles and conditions for learning from experience among teachers. In specific, this is about consequences of failure in relationships. A particular situation that happened during an ethnographic study in a middle school in Norway is used to get as close as possible to a teacher’s feelings and perceptions of a frustrating situation. The situation is followed up to understand how the individual teacher tried to deal with the problem and how her colleagues and the school management tried to support and help her. Interpreting the situation to involve violation of all dimensions of the teacher’s subjectivity (personal, professional and cultural), the problem seems to be too complex to deal with in the school organization. It seems as if teachers and leadership unconsciously avoid unbearable feelings, with the consequence that violation of the teachers is not recognised, and thus not possible to learn from. Problems were repeated rather than understood.
E-mentoring as a Critical E-learning Approach: The Impact of Social Presence on E-mentoring  [PDF]
Ellen A. Ensher
Communications and Network (CN) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/cn.2013.53B1001
Abstract: One important form of e-learning is e-mentoring. Virtual mentoring can occur within the context of formal organiza- tional programs or develop spontaneously between individuals online. While e-mentoring is burgeoning as a practice, theoretical research related to this important phenomenon has been limited. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that social presence theory presents a useful conceptual framework for understanding mentors’ willingness to participate in e-mentoring relationship and on their satisfaction. In sum, mentoring relationships that offer a blended approach with both high and low social presence forms of computer-mediated-communication (CMC) will be more satisfying to men- tors than those with low social presence CMC forms only. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
Beyond satisfaction: Using the Dynamics of Care assessment to better understand patients' experiences in care
Bruce Rapkin, Elisa Weiss, Rosy Chhabra, Laura Ryniker, Shilpa Patel, Jason Carness, Roberto Adsuar, Wendy Kahalas, Carol DeLaMarter, Ira Feldman, Judy DeLorenzo, Ellen Tanner
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-6-20
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to describe, validate, and discuss the benefits and limitations of the DoC, which was administered as part of a longitudinal study to evaluate the New York State HIV Special Needs Plan (SNP), a Medicaid managed care model for people living with HIV/AIDS. Data are from 426 study respondents across two time points.The results demonstrate the validity and value of the DoC. Help seeking decisions and satisfaction with care appear to be situation-specific, rather than person-specific. However, barriers to care appear to be more cross-situational for respondents, and may be associated with clients' living situations or care arrangements. Inventories in this assessment that were designed to identify potential deterrents to help seeking and difficulties encountered in care demonstrated clear principal component structures, and helped to explain satisfaction with care. The problem resolution index was found to be independent from satisfaction with care and the data were more normally distributed. DoC data were also associated with subsequent utilization and change in quality of life.The DoC was designed to be a flexible, integrated measure to determine individuals' salient service needs, help seeking and experiences in care. One of the many strengths of the assessment is its focus on specific problems in context, thus providing a more sensitive and informative way to understand processes in care from the patient's perspective. This approach can be used to direct new programs and resources to the patients and situations that require them.There is mounting evidence that variations in perceived quality of health care among people with HIV/AIDS affect patient behavior, especially adherence to medication regimens and other physician recommendations, as well as health outcomes [1-9]. As a result, client satisfaction has become the most important direct feedback to providers on the quality of services and the relationship of services to treatment outc
The Summation of One Class of Infinite Series  [PDF]
Jonathan D. Weiss
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/am.2014.517269
Abstract: This paper presents closed-form expressions for the series, \"\", where the sum is from n = 1 to n = ∞. These expressions were obtained by recasting the series in a different form, followed by the use of certain relationships involving the elliptical nome. Among the values of x for which these expressions can be obtained are of the form: \"\" and \"\", where l is an integer between ∞ and ∞. The values of λ include 1,\"\",\"\"and 3. Examples of closed-form expressions obtained in this manner are first presented for \"\", \"\", \"\", and \"\". Additional examples are then presented for \"\", \"\", \"\", and \"\". This undertaking was prompted by the author’s work on an electrostatics boundary-value problem related to the van der Pauw measurement technique of electrical resistivity. The presence of this series for x = \"\" in the solution of that problem and its absence from any compendium of infinite series that he consulted led to this work.
A Hypothesis Concerning the Effect of Schedule on the Pattern of 5-Fluorouracil Toxicity  [PDF]
Arthur J. Weiss
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2015.63028
Abstract:

The significant effect that scheduling has upon the severity and types of drug toxicity has been known for many years. Evidence is available demonstrating that the schedule chosen will substantially effect the relative distribution of drug to various target organs. It has been shown that a likely cause for this with doxorubicin is that the efficiency of the various enzyme complexes responsible for disposing of the drug can be affected by scheduling. We believe a similar process can explain the marked effect that scheduling has on the pattern of 5-fluorouracil toxicity and present both clinical and computer data to illustrate this.

The Gravitational Attraction between Hemispherical Masses  [PDF]
Jonathan D. Weiss
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/am.2017.86064
Abstract: This paper is a study of the gravitational attraction between two uniform hemispherical masses aligned such that the pair is cylindrically symmetric. Three variations are considered: flat side to flat side, curved side to curved side, and flat side to curved side. Expressions for the second and third variation are derived from the first, with the use of superposition and the well-known gravitational behavior of a spherical mass as equivalent to a point mass at its center. The study covers two masses of equal diameter and of different diameters, such that one is four times that of the other. Calculations are done for separations from zero to fifty times the radius of the larger of the two, which is effectively the asymptotic limit. It is demonstrated that at any separation, the force can be expressed as if the two hemispheres were point masses separated by a certain distance. Expressions for that distance and the location of the (fictitious) point masses within each hemisphere are presented. Unlike the case of two spherical masses, the location within their respective hemisphere is not necessarily the same for each point and both are dependent upon the separation between the two hemispheres. The calculation for the first variation is done in two ways. The first is a “brute force” multi-dimensional integral with the help of Wolfram Mathematica. The second is an axial expansion for the potential modified for off-axis locations by Legendre polynomials. With only a few terms in the expansion, the results of the second method are in extremely good agreement with those of the first. Finally, an interesting application to a split earth is presented.
Certain Aspects of the Gravitational Field of a Disk  [PDF]
Jonathan D. Weiss
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/am.2018.912089
Abstract:
There are at least two reasons why one would study the gravitational field of a disk. The first is that many astronomical objects, such as spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, are disk-like. The second is that the field of a disk is interesting, particularly when compared to that of a spherical, or near-spherical, object, which is much easier to analyze because of its high degree of symmetry. It is hoped that this study will augment previous work on this subject. The aspects presented in this paper are as follows: 1) both the radial and vertical gravitational fields of a thin disk within the plane of the disk and above it; 2) a comparison of some of the field results obtained by Lass and Blitzer (1983) involving elliptic integrals to those obtained by a standard numerical integration, now available online, and separately through the use of Legendre polynomials; 3) the logarithmic divergence of the radial field at the edge of a thin disk; 4) the fields in the plane of a disk containing a central hole, particularly within the hole, such as the rings of Saturn; 5) circular orbits within the plane of a single disk and half way between two disks, and their stability; 6) the escape velocity at a point within the Milky Way, particularly at the position of the solar system and without any added, or subtracted, orbital effects around the galactic center; and 7) the radial field at the circular edge of a disk of finite thickness.
The design, development and evaluation of a self-instructional module for nursing practice standards  [PDF]
June Anonson, Mary Ellen Walker
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2013.38073
Abstract:

The purpose of this research was to improve nursing professionals’ understanding of the important link to safe, competent, and ethical practices that Nursing Practice Standards (NPS) serve. This research on NPS may improve the scope and comprehensiveness by which the Standards are integrated with clinical, educational, administrative, and research-based nursing practices. This research was unique in that it includes nurses in developing NPS. The method by which this study was done involved sixteen practicing nurses and seven instructional design experts from Alberta, Canada participating in designing, developing, and evaluating a NPS module. Nursing practice standards are a vital aspect of performing safe, efficient and effective patient care. The manner in which Nursing Standard Practices are presented and taught will directly influence a nurse’s ability to understand the value of NPS and successfully incorporate NPS into practice.

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