oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2018 ( 1 )

2016 ( 2 )

2015 ( 50 )

2014 ( 69 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1024 matches for " Wallace; Mogili "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /1024
Display every page Item
The impact of a pharmacist assisted clinic upon medication adherence and quality of life in mental health patients
Lizer,Mitsi H.; Parnapy Jawaid,Sarah A.; Marsh,Wallace; Mogili,Lakuma;
Pharmacy Practice (Internet) , 2011, DOI: 10.4321/S1886-36552011000300002
Abstract: objectives: to determine if a pharmacist assisted psychiatric clinic would improve adherence to medications and quality of life over 6 months. the primary study endpoints were the change from baseline in medication adherence rating scale (mars), brief evaluation of medication influences and beliefs (bemib), world health organization quality of life - bref (whoqol-bref) scales as well as hospitalizations and emergency room visits. secondary endpoints included metabolic and physiologic parameters. methods: a prospective, single-center study conducted at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. subjects were required to attend 3 clinic visits (baseline, 3 and 6 months) with the pharmacist. subject and medication histories were obtained at each visit. subjects′ records within the local health system were reviewed for emergency room visits and hospitalizations. metabolic parameters were assessed at each visit. results: twenty-seven subjects enrolled and twenty subjects completed. total mars score at baseline and study end were 7.90 and 8.65, respectively. at baseline, 10 (50%) were nonadherent based on the bemib and 9 (45%) were nonadherent at 6 months. statistically significant improvements were seen in 2 domains of the whoqol-bref. reductions in both er visits and hospitalizations were achieved. there were significant improvements in total cholesterol and ldl. conclusions: improvements were seen in two domains of the whoqol-bref - physical capacity and psychological well-being over the 6 month period. while improvements were seen in various rating scales, due to small sample sizes, these were insignificant improvements. reductions in hospitalizations and er visits were also seen during the study and up to 6 months post study. statistically significant improvements were also seen in both total cholesterol and ldl. the lack of improvement in many of the study outcomes reflects the difficulty of the mental health population to adhere to treatment recommendations; but also unders
Papillary thyroid cancer: sporadic or inherited?
S Mogili, K Rajamani
Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa , 2012,
Abstract: Background: Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common thyroid malignancies, with an increase in incidence rates over the past few decades. Although the exact cause of thyroid cancer in most patients is still unclear, the possibility of genetic predisposition to PTC cannot be overlooked. Here, we report a case study of PTC, in which the family was extensively affected, with each family member diagnosed with either benign or malignant thyroid neoplasms, or functional thyroid disorder. Method: A 57-year-old white female with a past medical history of hypothyroidism, and a significant family history of multiple thyroid cancers, was found to have new onset thyroid nodules during a routine screening ultrasound. Fine needle aspiration revealed suspicious papillary carcinoma (follicular variant). The patient underwent total thyroidectomy. Results: The histology report revealed total colloid nodules in the right lobe with focal calcification, lymphocytic thyroiditis, and two foci of papillary microcarcinoma. The patient subsequently underwent radioactive iodine ablation therapy, along with pilocarpine and thyrogen injection. Conclusion: This case study illustrates the need for awareness of the possibility of genetic predisposition to, as well female preponderance of, familial PTC.
The impact of a pharmacist assisted clinic upon medication adherence and quality of life in mental health patients
Lizer MH,Parnapy Jawaid SA,Marsh W,Mogili L
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2011,
Abstract: Objectives: To determine if a pharmacist assisted psychiatric clinic would improve adherence to medications and quality of life over 6 months. The primary study endpoints were the change from baseline in Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS), Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs (BEMIB), World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) scales as well as hospitalizations and emergency room visits. Secondary endpoints included metabolic and physiologic parameters.Methods: A prospective, single-center study conducted at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Subjects were required to attend 3 clinic visits (baseline, 3 and 6 months) with the pharmacist. Subject and medication histories were obtained at each visit. Subjects’ records within the local health system were reviewed for emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Metabolic parameters were assessed at each visit.Results: Twenty-seven subjects enrolled and twenty subjects completed. Total MARS score at baseline and study end were 7.90 and 8.65, respectively. At baseline, 10 (50%) were nonadherent based on the BEMIB and 9 (45%) were nonadherent at 6 months. Statistically significant improvements were seen in 2 domains of the WHOQOL-BREF. Reductions in both ER visits and hospitalizations were achieved. There were significant improvements in total cholesterol and LDL.Conclusions: Improvements were seen in two domains of the WHOQOL-BREF – physical capacity and psychological well-being over the 6 month period. While improvements were seen in various rating scales, due to small sample sizes, these were insignificant improvements. Reductions in hospitalizations and ER visits were also seen during the study and up to 6 months post study. Statistically significant improvements were also seen in both total cholesterol and LDL. The lack of improvement in many of the study outcomes reflects the difficulty of the mental health population to adhere to treatment recommendations; but also underscores the need for continued research in this area. This pilot demonstrates the pharmacist’s ability to provide comprehensive medication management services to the psychiatric outpatient.
FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF EXTENDED RELEASE MATRIX TABLETS OF TRIMETAZIDINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE
Mogili Dinesh,R.Manivannan,Radhakrishna,Abhishek.P
International Research Journal of Pharmacy , 2013,
Abstract: Oral ingestion has long been the most convenient and commonly employed route of drug delivery. Indeed, for Extended release systems, the oral route of administration has by far received the most attention with respect to research on physiological and drug constraints as well as design and testing of products. The primary objective of the extended release (Matrix) drug delivery system is to ensure safety and to improve efficacy of drug as well as patient compliance. The present invention provides a novel sustained release composition comprising Trimetazidine Dihydrochloride. The objective of the present study was to formulate and evaluate once daily extended release matrix tablets of Trimetazidine Dihydrochloride using hydrophilic polymers Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, Polyox, and natural polymer Xanthan gum. Trimetazidine has a half life 6 hrs and usual oral dosage regimen 0.5 mg and 60 mg daily. To reduce the frequency of administration and to improve patient compliance, a once-daily extended release formulation of Trimetazidine is desirable. The most commonly used method of modulating the drug release is to include it in a matrix system. Hydrophilic polymer matrix systems were widely used in oral controlled drug delivery because they make it easier to achieve a desirable drug-release profile, they are cost effective and they have broad US Food and Drug Administration acceptance. Hence, in present work, an attempt has been made to develop once daily sustained release matrix tablets of Trimetazidine using putative hydrophilic matrix materials. The drug release for extended duration using a hydrophilic matrix system is restricted because of rapid diffusion of dissolved drug through the hydrophilic gel network.
Urban Systems during Disasters: Factors for Resilience
Deborah Wallace,Rodrick Wallace
Ecology and Society , 2008,
Abstract: Urban neighborhoods form the basic functional unit of municipalities. Socioeconomically, they consist of social networks and interlocking layers of social networks. Old, stable neighborhoods are blessed with large social networks and dense interlocking layers. Both social control and social support depend on these complex structures of tight and loose ties. Public health and public order depend on these structures. They are the basis of resilience of both the neighborhood itself and of the municipality that is composed of neighborhoods. In New York City in the 1970s and later, domain shift occurred because of the disruption of the socioeconomic structure by the massive destruction of low-rental housing. A combined epidemic of building fires and landlord abandonment of buildings leveled a huge percentage of housing in poor neighborhoods and forced mass migration between neighborhoods. Social relationships that had existed between families and individuals for decades were destroyed. Community efficacy also greatly diminished. Drug use, violent crime, tuberculosis, and low-weight births were among the many public health and public order problems that soared in incidence consequent to the unraveling of the communities. These problems spilled out into the metropolitan region of dependent suburban counties. The ability of a municipality and its dependent suburban counties to weather a disaster such as an avian flu pandemic depends on the size of social networks in its neighborhoods and on the interconnection between the social networks. Diversity such as gained by social and economic integration influences the strength of the loose ties between social networks. Poor neighborhoods with extreme resilience conferred by a dense fabric of social networks must also maintain connections with mainstream political structure or they will fail to react to both good and bad impacts and communications.
Magic Strategies: the basic biology of multilevel, multiscale, health promotion
Rodrick Wallace,Deborah Wallace
PeerJ , 2015, DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.8v2
Abstract: A survey of the cultural psychology and related literatures suggests that Western biomedicine's fascination with atomistic, individual-oriented, interventions is a cultural artifact that may have little consonance with complex, subtle, multiscale, multilevel, social, ecological, or biological realities. Other cultural traditions may, in fact, view atomistic strategies as inherently unreal. A contrary perspective - similar to that of health promotion - suggests that the most effective medical or public health interventions must be analogously patterned across scale and level of organization: 'magic strategies' will almost always be synergistically - and often emergently - more effective than 'magic bullets'. The result can be formally derived in a relatively straightforward manner using an adaptation of the Black-Scholes economietric model, applied here to the metabolic cost of bioregulation under uncertainty. Multifactorial interventions focused at the human 'keystone' ecosystem level of mesoscale social and geographic groupings may be particularly effective. The analysis indicates that there is unlikely to be much in the way of 'simple' chronic disease. That is, serious comorbidity is usually inevitable, and may often be a consequence of therapeutic intervention itself. Study suggests that pairing of medical and prevention strategies with appropriate mesoscale neighborhood/social network interventions would: (1) Damp down unwanted treatment side effects. (2) Make the therapeutic alliance between practitioner and patient more effective. (3) Improve patient compliance. (4) Enhance placebo effect. (5) In the context of real stress reduction, synergistically improve the actual biological impacts of medical interventions or prevention strategies.
Resilience reconsidered: Case histories from disease ecology
Rodrick Wallace,Deborah Wallace
Quantitative Biology , 2003,
Abstract: We expand the current understanding of ecological resilience to include the nested hierarchy of cognitive submodules that particularly, if not uniquely, delineates human ecosystems. These modules, ranging from the immune system to the local social network, are embedded in a cultural milieu which, to take the perspective of the evolutionary anthropologist Robert Boyd, ''is as much a part of human biology as the enamel on our teeth''. We begin by extending recent treatments of cognitive process as associated with characteristic information sources to a certain class of ecosystems through a generalization of coarse-graining. In the spirit of the Large Deviations Program, we then import renormalization formalism via the Asymptotic Equipartition Theorem to obtain punctuated response to parameters of increasing habitat degradation. A Legendre transform of an appropriate joint information permits analysis away from critical points, and generates the expected quasi-stability in a highly natural manner. We interweave the discussion with applications to the public health impacts of the massive deurbanization and deindustrialization presently afflicting the United States.
Structured psychosocial stress and therapeutic failure
Rodrick Wallace,Deborah Wallace
Quantitative Biology , 2003,
Abstract: Generalized language-of-thought arguments appropriate to interacting cognitive modules permit exploration of how disease states interact with medical treatment. The interpenetrating feedback between treatment and response to it creates a kind of idiotypic hall-of-mirrors generating a synergistic pattern of efficacy, treatment failure, adverse reactions, and patient noncompliance which, from a Rate Distortion perspective, embodies a distorted image of externally-imposed structured psychosocial stress. For the US, accelerating spatial and social diffusion of such stress enmeshes both dominant and subordinate populations in a linked system which will express itself, not only in an increasingly unhealthy society, but in the diffusion of therapeutic failure, including, but not limited to, drug-based treatments.
Explaining the Double-Slit Experiment  [PDF]
Moshe Wallace Callen, Shaul Sorek
Journal of Modern Physics (JMP) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2011.21006
Abstract: In response to Orion and Laitman’s [1] explanation of the classic double-slit experiment of quantum mechanics, we propose an alternate explanation of that experiment by treating physical degrees of freedom as a conserved physical quantity, instead of referring to “vague terms” used in previous explanations, [1], that are not broadly applicable. Explanation in [1] refers to properties of groups of particles, even though the double-slit experiment’s results should address only to a single particle. By using physical degrees of freedom and the application of Hamilton’s principle, we obtain a single particle explanation of the double-slit experiment in terms of properties and via methods which apply equally in a quantum and a classical regime.
Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, and pathogenic social hierarchy: a biological limit to possible reductions in morbidity and mortality
Rodrick Wallace,Deborah Wallace,Robert G. Wallace
Quantitative Biology , 2003,
Abstract: We suggest that a particular form of social hierarchy, which we characterize as 'pathogenic', can, from the earliest stages of life, exert a formal analog to evolutionary selection pressure, literally writing a permanent developmental image of itself upon immune function as chronic vascular inflammation and its consequences. The staged nature of resulting disease emerges 'naturally' as a rough analog to punctuated equilibrium in evolutionary theory, although selection pressure is a passive filter rather than an active agent like structured psychosocial stress. Exposure differs according to the social constructs of race, class, and ethnicity, accounting in large measure for observed population-level differences in rates of coronary heart disease across industrialized societies. American Apartheid, which enmeshes both majority and minority communities in a social construct of pathogenic hierarchy, appears to present a severe biological limit to continuing declines in coronary heart disease for powerful as well as subordinate subgroups: 'Culture', to use the words of the evolutionary anthropologist Robert Boyd, 'is as much a part of human biology as the enamel on our teeth'.
Page 1 /1024
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.