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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 84427 matches for " Waldh?usl W "
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Diabetes mellitus und koronare Herzkrankheit
Gasic S,Waldhusl W
Journal für Kardiologie , 2000,
Abstract: Der Begriff der "diabetischen Herzkrankheit" beschreibt ein komplexes klinisches Syndrom, welches sowohl die koronare Herzkrankheit (Makroangiopathie), strukturelle Gef sch digungen an kleinen Gef en (Mikroangiopathie), St rungen des Myokardstoffwechsels und der Myokardfunktion, der nervalen kardialen Versorgung sowie hypertoniebedingte morphologische und funktionelle St rungen und auch Ver nderungen der H mostase betrifft. Eine klinische Betrachtung der koronaren Herzkrankheit des Diabetikers kann daher nur unter Berücksichtigung aller Facetten der diabetischen Herzkrankheit erfolgen. Das Ergebnis der komplexen kardialen Ver nderungen des Diabetikers ist eine überproportional h here Pr valenz (5x) von t dlichen Myokardinfarkten. Die kardiologische Betreuung des Diabetikers erfordert eine Früherfassung aller Teilfacetten der diabetischen Herzkrankheit. Die pr ventiven und therapeutischen Ma nahmen sind daher für alle parallel bestehenden Defektsituationen (Blutglukose, LDL-, HDL-Cholesterin, Blutdruck, Mikroalbuminurie, K rpergewicht) voll auszusch pfen, wobei die Ziele einer Sekund rpr vention (Triglyzeride 150 mg/dl, LDL-Cholesterin 100 mg/dl, Blutdruck 130/85 mmHg) absolute Gültigkeit besitzen müssen.
Skeletal Muscle Phosphodiester Content Relates to Body Mass and Glycemic Control
Julia Szendroedi, Albrecht Ingo Schmid, Marek Chmelik, Martin Krssak, Peter Nowotny, Thomas Prikoszovich, Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, Michael Wolzt, Werner Waldhusl, Michael Roden
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021846
Abstract: Background Aging and insulin resistance have been related to reduced mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Muscular phosphodiesters (PDE) are comprised of metabolites of phospholipid breakdown and may reflect membrane damage. We aimed to test the hypothesis that myocellular PDE are increased in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and correlate inversely with mitochondrial ATP turnover. Methods A Cross-sectional study in the Clinical Research Facility of an University hospital was performed. 10 nonobese middle-aged patients with T2D, 10 healthy humans matched for sex, age and physical activity index (CONm) and 18 young healthy humans (CONy) were included. Myocellular PDE and unidirectional flux through ATP synthase (fATP) were measured with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Intramyocellular (IMCL) and hepatocellular lipid deposition (HCL) were quantified with 1H MRS. Insulin sensitivity (Rd) was assessed from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests in 10 T2D, 10 CONm and 11 CONy. Results During fasting, T2D and CONm had 1.5 fold greater PDE than CONy (2.8±0.2, 2.5±0.2, 1.7±0.1 mmol/l, P = 0.004). Stimulation by insulin did not affect PDE in any group. PDE correlated negatively with Rd (r = ?0.552, p<0.005) and fATP (r = ?0.396, p<0.05) and positively with age (r = 0.656, p<0.001) and body mass (r = 0.597, p<0.001). PDE also related positively to HbA1c (r = 0.674, p<0.001) and fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.629, p<0.001) within T2D and across all participants. Conclusions Muscular PDE concentrations associate with age, lower resting mitochondrial activity and insulin resistance, which is determined mainly by body mass and glycemia.
Primary and secondary succession on wooded peat-bogs
Robert Neuh?usl
Acta Societatis Botanicorum Poloniae , 1992, DOI: 10.5586/1160
Abstract: Study of primary and secondary succession on wooded peat- bogs are presented. Research has been done on a complex of mountain peat-bogs in the Bohemian Moravian Highland (Czechoslovakia). Natural succession series began with reed sedge and reed stands and terminated with Viccinio uliginosi-Pinetum, Calamagrostio villosae-Piceatum and Alnion glutinosae uder oligotrophic, oligo-mesotrophic and meso-eutrophic conditions, respectively. In marginal parts of peat-bogs (lagg) sedge fens are followed by birch cart. Open pine stands (Pino rotundatae-Sphagnetum) is submitted to cyclic succesion. The secondary succession may begin with the Sphagnum cuspidatum, Eriophorum angustifolium or Carex rostrata, and Carex rostrata stages, depending on trophic conditions of water. The final stage is usually Vaccinio uliginosi-Pinetum or Pino rotundatae-Spagnetum. Secondary succession pattern is influenced both by eutrophication and peat-land drainage.
An Open Distributed Architecture for Sensor Networks for Risk Management
John Douglas,Thomas Usl???¤nder,Gerald Schimak,J. Fernando Esteban
Sensors , 2008,
Abstract: Sensors provide some of the basic input data for risk management of natural andman-made hazards. Here the word ¢ € sensors ¢ € covers everything from remote sensingsatellites, providing invaluable images of large regions, through instruments installed on theEarth ¢ € s surface to instruments situated in deep boreholes and on the sea floor, providinghighly-detailed point-based information from single sites. Data from such sensors is used inall stages of risk management, from hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment in the preeventphase, information to provide on-site help during the crisis phase through to data toaid in recovery following an event. Because data from sensors play such an important part inimproving understanding of the causes of risk and consequently in its mitigation,considerable investment has been made in the construction and maintenance of highlysophisticatedsensor networks. In spite of the ubiquitous need for information from sensornetworks, the use of such data is hampered in many ways. Firstly, information about thepresence and capabilities of sensor networks operating in a region is difficult to obtain dueto a lack of easily available and usable meta-information. Secondly, once sensor networkshave been identified their data it is often difficult to access due to a lack of interoperability between dissemination and acquisition systems. Thirdly, the transfer and processing ofinformation from sensors is limited, again by incompatibilities between systems. Therefore,the current situation leads to a lack of efficiency and limited use of the available data thathas an important role to play in risk mitigation. In view of this situation, the EuropeanCommission (EC) is funding a number of Integrated Projects within the Sixth FrameworkProgramme concerned with improving the accessibility of data and services for riskmanagement. Two of these projects: ¢ € Open Architecture and Spatial Data Infrastructure forRisk Management ¢ € (ORCHESTRA, http://www.eu-orchestra.org/) and ¢ € Sensors Anywhere ¢ € (SANY, http://sany-ip.eu/) are discussed in this article. These projects have developed anopen distributed information technology architecture and have implemented web servicesfor the accessing and using data emanating, for example, from sensor networks. Thesedevelopments are based on existing data and service standards proposed by internationalorganizations. The projects seek to develop the ideals of the EC directive INSPIRE(http://inspire.jrc.it), which was launched in 2001 and whose implementation began this year(2007), into the risk m
Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Signatures Defining the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition during Cancer Progression
Christian J. Gr?ger, Markus Grubinger, Thomas Waldh?r, Klemens Vierlinger, Wolfgang Mikulits
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051136
Abstract: The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents a crucial event during cancer progression and dissemination. EMT is the conversion of carcinoma cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype that associates with a higher cell motility as well as enhanced chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Notably, EMT has been increasingly recognized as an early event of metastasis. Numerous gene expression studies (GES) have been conducted to obtain transcriptome signatures and marker genes to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying EMT. Yet, no meta-analysis considering the multitude of GES of EMT has been performed to comprehensively elaborate the core genes in this process. Here we report the meta-analysis of 18 independent and published GES of EMT which focused on different cell types and treatment modalities. Computational analysis revealed clustering of GES according to the type of treatment rather than to cell type. GES of EMT induced via transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor-α treatment yielded uniformly defined clusters while GES of models with alternative EMT induction clustered in a more complex fashion. In addition, we identified those up- and downregulated genes which were shared between the multitude of GES. This core gene list includes well known EMT markers as well as novel genes so far not described in this process. Furthermore, several genes of the EMT-core gene list significantly correlated with impaired pathological complete response in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive survey of available EMT expression signatures and shows fundamental insights into the mechanisms that are governing carcinoma progression.
An Open Distributed Architecture for Sensor Networks for Risk Management
John Douglas,Thomas Usl?nder,Gerald Schimak,J. Fernando Esteban,Ralf Denzer
Sensors , 2008, DOI: 10.3390/s8031755
Abstract: Sensors provide some of the basic input data for risk management of natural andman-made hazards. Here the word ‘sensors’ covers everything from remote sensingsatellites, providing invaluable images of large regions, through instruments installed on theEarth’s surface to instruments situated in deep boreholes and on the sea floor, providinghighly-detailed point-based information from single sites. Data from such sensors is used inall stages of risk management, from hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment in the preeventphase, information to provide on-site help during the crisis phase through to data toaid in recovery following an event. Because data from sensors play such an important part inimproving understanding of the causes of risk and consequently in its mitigation,considerable investment has been made in the construction and maintenance of highlysophisticatedsensor networks. In spite of the ubiquitous need for information from sensornetworks, the use of such data is hampered in many ways. Firstly, information about thepresence and capabilities of sensor networks operating in a region is difficult to obtain dueto a lack of easily available and usable meta-information. Secondly, once sensor networkshave been identified their data it is often difficult to access due to a lack of interoperability between dissemination and acquisition systems. Thirdly, the transfer and processing ofinformation from sensors is limited, again by incompatibilities between systems. Therefore,the current situation leads to a lack of efficiency and limited use of the available data thathas an important role to play in risk mitigation. In view of this situation, the EuropeanCommission (EC) is funding a number of Integrated Projects within the Sixth FrameworkProgramme concerned with improving the accessibility of data and services for riskmanagement. Two of these projects: ‘Open Architecture and Spatial Data Infrastructure forRisk Management’ (ORCHESTRA, http://www.eu-orchestra.org/) and ‘Sensors Anywhere’(SANY, http://sany-ip.eu/) are discussed in this article. These projects have developed anopen distributed information technology architecture and have implemented web servicesfor the accessing and using data emanating, for example, from sensor networks. Thesedevelopments are based on existing data and service standards proposed by internationalorganizations. The projects seek to develop the ideals of the EC directive INSPIRE(http://inspire.jrc.it), which was launched in 2001 and whose implementation began this year(2007), into the risk management domain. Thanks to the open nature of the architecture andservices being developed within these projects, they can be implemented by any interestedparty and can be accessed by all potential users. The architecture is based around a serviceorientedapproach that makes use of Internet-based applications (web services) whose inputsand outputs conform to standards. The benefit of this philosophy is that it is expected tofavor the emergence of an operational market for risk management services in Europe, iteliminates the need to replace or radically alter the hundreds of already operational ITsystems in Europe (drastically lowering costs for users), and it allows users and stakeholdersto achieve interoperability while using the system most adequate to their needs, budgets,culture etc. (i.e. it has flexibility).
Hippocampal Homer1 Levels Influence Motivational Behavior in an Operant Conditioning Task
Klaus V. Wagner, Alexander S. H?usl, Max L. P?hlmann, Jakob Hartmann, Christiana Labermaier, Marianne B. Müller, Mathias V. Schmidt
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085975
Abstract: Loss of motivation and learning impairments are commonly accepted core symptoms of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. Reward-motivated learning is dependent on the hippocampal formation but the molecular mechanisms that lead to functional incentive motivation in this brain region are still largely unknown. Recent evidence implicates neurotransmission via metabotropic glutamate receptors and Homer1, their interaction partner in the postsynaptic density, in drug addiction and motivational learning. As previous reports mainly focused on the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, we now investigated the role of hippocampal Homer1 in operant reward learning in the present study. We therefore tested either Homer1 knockout mice or mice that overexpress Homer1 in the hippocampus in an operant conditioning paradigm. Our results show that deletion of Homer1 leads to a diverging phenotype that either displays an inability to perform the task or outstanding hyperactivity in both learning and motivational sessions. Due to the apparent bimodal distribution of this phenotype, the overall effect of Homer1 deletion in this paradigm is not significantly altered. Overexpression of hippocampal Homer1 did not lead to a significantly altered learning performance in any stage of the testing paradigm, yet may subtly contribute to emerging motivational deficits. Our results indicate an involvement of Homer1-mediated signaling in the hippocampus in motivation-based learning tasks and encourage further investigations regarding the specific molecular underpinnings of the phenotypes observed in this study. We also suggest to cautiously interpret the results of this and other studies regarding the phenotype following Homer1 manipulations in animals, since their behavioral phenotype appears to be highly diverse. Future studies would benefit from larger group sizes that would allow splitting the experimental groups in responders and non-responders.
Adenoviruses Using the Cancer Marker EphA2 as a Receptor In Vitro and In Vivo by Genetic Ligand Insertion into Different Capsid Scaffolds
Michael Behr, Johanna K. Kaufmann, Patrick Ketzer, Sarah Engelhardt, Martin Mück-H?usl, Pamela M. Okun, Gabriele Petersen, Frank Neipel, Jessica C. Hassel, Anja Ehrhardt, Alexander H. Enk, Dirk M. Nettelbeck
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095723
Abstract: Adenoviral gene therapy and oncolysis would critically benefit from targeted cell entry by genetically modified capsids. This requires both the ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the identification of ligands that remain functional in virus context. Here, we establish cell type-specific entry of HAdV-5-based vectors by genetic ligand insertion into a chimeric fiber with shaft and knob domains of the short HAdV-41 fiber (Ad5T/41sSK). This fiber format was reported to ablate transduction in vitro and biodistribution to the liver in vivo. We show that the YSA peptide, binding to the pan-cancer marker EphA2, can be inserted into three positions of the chimeric fiber, resulting in strong transduction of EphA2-positive but not EphA2-negative cells of human melanoma biopsies and of tumor xenografts after intratumoral injection. Transduction was blocked by soluble YSA peptide and restored for EphA2-negative cells after recombinant EphA2 expression. The YSA peptide could also be inserted into three positions of a CAR binding-ablated HAdV-5 fiber enabling specific transduction; however, the Ad5T/41sSK format was superior in vivo. In conclusion, we establish an adenovirus capsid facilitating functional insertion of targeting peptides and a novel adenovirus using the tumor marker EphA2 as receptor with high potential for cancer gene therapy and viral oncolysis.
Bauxit
. W.
Nieuwe West-Indische Gids , 1951,
Abstract:
Creation of High Energy/Intensity Bremsstrahlung by a Multi-Target and Focusing of the Scattered Electrons by Small-Angle Backscatter at a Cone Wall and a Magnetic Field—Enhancement of the Outcome of Linear Accelerators in Radiotherapy  [PDF]
W. Ulmer
International Journal of Medical Physics,Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology (IJMPCERO) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijmpcero.2013.24020
Abstract: The yield of bremsstrahlung (BS) from collisions of fast electrons (energy at least 6 MeV) with a Tungsten target can be significantly improved by exploitation of Tungsten wall scatter in a multi-layered target. A simplified version of a previously developed principle is also able to focus on small angle scattered electrons by a Tungsten wall. It is necessary that the thickness of each Tungsten layer does not exceed 0.04 mm—a thickness of 0.03 mm is suitable for accelerators in medical physics. Further focusing of electrons results from suitable magnetic fields with field strength between 0.5 Tesla and 1.2 Tesla (if the cone with multi-layered targets is rather narrow). Linear accelerators in radiation therapy only need to be focused by wall scatter without further magnetic fields (a standard case: 31 plates with 0.03 mm thickness and 1 mm distance between the plates). We considered three cases with importance in medical physics: A very small cone with an additional magnetic field for focusing (the field diameter at 90 cm depth: 6 cm), a medium cone with an optional magnetic field (field diameter at 90 cm depth: 13 cm) and a broad cone without a magnetic field (
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