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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 142132 matches for " Vanessa K Noonan "
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Comparing the content of participation instruments using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Vanessa K Noonan, Jacek A Kopec, Luc Noreau, Joel Singer, Anna Chan, Louise C Masse, Marcel F Dvorak
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-7-93
Abstract: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify instruments that assess participation according to the ICF. Instruments were considered to assess participation and were included if the domains contain content from a minimum of three ICF chapters ranging from Chapter 3 Communication to Chapter 9 Community, social and civic life in the activities and participation component. The instrument content was examined by first identifying the meaningful concepts in each question and then linking these concepts to ICF categories. The content analysis included reporting the 1) ICF chapters (domains) covered in the activities and participation component, 2) relevance of the meaningful concepts to the activities and participation component and 3) context in which the activities and participation component categories are evaluated.Eight instruments were included: Impact on Participation and Autonomy, Keele Assessment of Participation, Participation Survey/Mobility, Participation Measure-Post Acute Care, Participation Objective Participation Subjective, Participation Scale (P-Scale), Rating of Perceived Participation and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS II). 1351 meaningful concepts were identified in the eight instruments. There are differences among the instruments regarding how participation is operationalized. All the instruments cover six to eight of the nine chapters in the activities and participation component. The P-Scale and WHODAS II have questions which do not contain any meaningful concepts related to the activities and participation component. Differences were also observed in how other ICF components (body functions, environmental factors) and health are operationalized in the instruments.Linking the meaningful concepts in the participation instruments to the ICF classification provided an objective and comprehensive method for analyzing the content. The content analysis revealed differences in how the concept of participat
Modeling the Patient Journey from Injury to Community Reintegration for Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Canadian Centre
Argelio Santos, James Gurling, Marcel F. Dvorak, Vanessa K. Noonan, Michael G. Fehlings, Anthony S. Burns, Rachel Lewis, Lesley Soril, Nader Fallah, John T. Street, Lise Bélanger, Andrea Townson, Liping Liang, Derek Atkins
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072552
Abstract: Background A patient’s journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. Methods To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC), Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. Findings To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s) of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. Conclusion The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery.
Sustained inflammation 1.5 years post-stroke is not associated with depression in elderly stroke survivors
Noonan K, Crewther SG, Carey LM, Pascoe MC, Linden T
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S38547
Abstract: stained inflammation 1.5 years post-stroke is not associated with depression in elderly stroke survivors Original Research (670) Total Article Views Authors: Noonan K, Crewther SG, Carey LM, Pascoe MC, Linden T Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:8 Pages 69 - 74 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S38547 Received: 26 September 2012 Accepted: 02 November 2012 Published: 22 January 2013 Kate Noonan,1,2 Sheila G Crewther,1,2 Leeanne M Carey,2,4 Michaela C Pascoe,5 Thomas Linden2,3 1School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia; 2Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; 3Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 4Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia; 5Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia Background: Depression is common in elderly stroke survivors and has been associated with systemic inflammation. We aimed to investigate an elderly population of Swedish stroke patients for evidence of sustained peripheral inflammation 18 months post-stroke and to identify if inflammation is associated with post-stroke depression at 18 months post-stroke. Methods: The Barthel Index was used to measure the level of impairment in activities of daily living at 3 days post-stroke. Serum concentrations of inflammation markers, ie, C-reactive protein and white cell count, were measured in 149 stroke patients (mean age 81 ± 5.33 years, 35% male) at 18 months post-stroke, and a comparison was made with an age-matched sample of elderly Swedish individuals who had not suffered a stroke. At the same visit, clinical depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised criteria. Severity of depression was assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Results: Mean C-reactive protein and white cell count levels in stroke patients were significantly elevated at 18 months post-stroke compared with population probands. Disability scores were associated with MADRS depression scores, but C-reactive protein and white cell count were not. Conclusion: We found evidence for a sustained peripheral inflammatory response at 18 months post-stroke. C-reactive protein and white cell count were not associated with depression in this study.
Sustained inflammation 1.5 years post-stroke is not associated with depression in elderly stroke survivors
Noonan K,Crewther SG,Carey LM,Pascoe MC
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2013,
Abstract: Kate Noonan,1,2 Sheila G Crewther,1,2 Leeanne M Carey,2,4 Michaela C Pascoe,5 Thomas Linden2,31School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia; 2Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; 3Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 4Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia; 5Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University, Melbourne, AustraliaBackground: Depression is common in elderly stroke survivors and has been associated with systemic inflammation. We aimed to investigate an elderly population of Swedish stroke patients for evidence of sustained peripheral inflammation 18 months post-stroke and to identify if inflammation is associated with post-stroke depression at 18 months post-stroke.Methods: The Barthel Index was used to measure the level of impairment in activities of daily living at 3 days post-stroke. Serum concentrations of inflammation markers, ie, C-reactive protein and white cell count, were measured in 149 stroke patients (mean age 81 ± 5.33 years, 35% male) at 18 months post-stroke, and a comparison was made with an age-matched sample of elderly Swedish individuals who had not suffered a stroke. At the same visit, clinical depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised criteria. Severity of depression was assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS).Results: Mean C-reactive protein and white cell count levels in stroke patients were significantly elevated at 18 months post-stroke compared with population probands. Disability scores were associated with MADRS depression scores, but C-reactive protein and white cell count were not.Conclusion: We found evidence for a sustained peripheral inflammatory response at 18 months post-stroke. C-reactive protein and white cell count were not associated with depression in this study.Keywords: geriatric, inflammatory, ischemia, mood
Life Value and Social Justice
Jeffrey Noonan
Studies in Social Justice , 2011,
Abstract:
The Life-Value of Death: Mortality, Finitude, and Meaningful Lives
Jeff Noonan
Journal of Philosophy of Life , 2013,
Abstract: In his seminal reflection on the badness of death, Nagel links it to the permanent loss “of whatever good there is in living.” I will argue, following McMurtry, that “whatever good there is in living” is defined by the life-value of resources, institutions, experiences, and activities. Enjoyed expressions of the human capacities to experience the world, to form relationships, and to act as creative agents are (with important qualifications) intrinsically life-valuable, the reason why anyone would desire to go on living indefinitely. As Nagel argues, “the fact that we will eventually die in a few score years cannot by itself imply that it would not be good to live longer. If there is no limit to the amount of life that it would be good to have, then it may be that a bad end is in store for all of us.” In this paper I want to question whether in fact there is no limit to the amount of life it would be good to have. My general conclusion will be that it is not the case that the eternal or even indefinite prolongation of any particular individual life necessarily increases life-value. Were death thus somehow removed as an inescapable limiting frame on human life, overall reductions of life-value would be the consequence. Individual and collective life would lose those forms of moral and material life-value that form the bases of life’s being meaningful and purposive.
Effect of Religiosity and Dysfunctional Dating Attitudes on Youth Substance Use
Andra Teten Tharp,C. Nathan DeWall,Stephanie B. Richman,Rita K. Noonan
Journal of Addiction , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/143709
Abstract: The current investigation examined the interactive effect of dysfunctional dating attitudes and religiosity on substance use in a large sample of youth ( ) from the YouthStyles survey. Based on past research, we explored the possibility that religiosity buffered the association between dysfunctional dating attitudes and substance use. Because age was significantly associated with all study variables, we included age in our analyses. In support of our hypothesis we found an attitude by religiosity by age interaction among youth with moderate levels of dysfunctional dating attitudes. Among these youth, the buffering effect of religiosity increased with age. For youth with low and high dysfunctional dating attitudes, religiosity did not buffer the association. The results of this study are in line with past work that suggests that the association between relationship characteristics and substance use is complex. It also identifies religiosity as a protective factor for the effect of dating attitudes on substance use but suggests that these effects may be the most important for youth with moderate levels of dysfunctional dating attitudes. 1. Introduction Substance use and relationship problems are significant issues facing youth. The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that 34.9% of high school students had used alcohol and 23% used marijuana in the 30 days prior to the survey; among the 73.9% of high school students who had dated in the 12 months prior to the survey, 10.3% experienced prior-year physical dating violence and 10.4% experienced prior-year sexual dating violence [1]. Substance use has been supported as a risk factor for dating violence perpetration and victimization (for review, see [2]) and as a consequence of dating violence victimization [3]. Less work has examined the role that dating attitudes and relationship characteristics play in youth’s substance use. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, two studies have found that partner and relationship characteristics can have differing effects on subsequent substance use. Kreager and Haynie [4] found that, for boys and girls who reported that the friends of their dating partner used alcohol, their own drinking frequency and binge drinking had increased when assessed one year later. In contrast, Gudonis-Miller, et al. [5] found that as relationship seriousness increased over time, marijuana use decreased. Taken together, these studies suggest that aspects of youth romantic relationships can be either risk or protective factors for substance use. While the
Managing contested greenspace: neighborhood commons and the rise of dog parks
Daniel Matisoff,Douglas Noonan
International Journal of the Commons , 2012,
Abstract: Dog parks present an emerging class or urban environmental amenities. In order to develop a better understanding of dog parks, this article applies existing literature regarding urban parks and common pool resource (CPR) management to off-leash recreation areas. We develop a typology dog-park management and build upon a survey of 298 dog park users of a major dog park. We test the relationship between the perception of the park as a successfully governed CPR, and behaviour which contributes to collective action, such as contributing time, money, or to the upkeep of the park and developing a sense of community. We see strong relationships between these indicators of overcoming collective action problems and the four variables corresponding to design principles. Across all models, feeling involved in rule-making positively and significantly predicts more collective action or stronger sense of community.
The Goulden-Jackson Cluster Method: Extensions, Applications and Implementations
John Noonan,Doron Zeilberger
Mathematics , 1998,
Abstract: The powerful (and so far under-utilized) Goulden-Jackson Cluster method for finding the generating function for the number of words avoiding, as factors, the members of a prescribed set of `dirty words', is tutorialized and extended in various directions. The authors' Maple implementations, contained in several Maple packages available from this paper's website (http://www.math.temple.edu/~zeilberg/gj.html), are described and explained.
The Enumeration of Permutations With a Prescribed Number of ``Forbidden'' Patterns
John Noonan,Doron Zeilberger
Mathematics , 1998,
Abstract: We initiate a general approach for the fast enumeration of permutations with a prescribed number of occurrences of `forbidden' patterns, that seems to indicate that the enumerating sequence is always P-recursive. We illustrate the method completely in terms of the patterns `abc',`cab' and `abcd'.
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