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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 34377 matches for " Thomas Meyer "
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Virtuelle Forschungsumgebungen in der Geschichtswissenschaft – L sungsans tze und Perspektiven
Thomas Meyer
Libreas : Library Ideas , 2011,
Abstract: Seit 2008 werden Virtuelle Forschungsumgebungen“ durch die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) in einem Programm im Bereich der Literatur-und Informationsversorgung gef rdert, vorangegangen sind dem verschiedene Entwicklungen vor allem in Gro britannien, wo das Thema schon einige Jahre früher auf der Agenda stand. Virtuelle Forschungsumgebungen“ werden unter anderem entwickelt für die Schulbuchforschung (edumeres.net) , die Asienstudien (crossasia) , für eine Visuelle Ethnologie“ , im Bereich der Kunstgeschichte (Meta-Image) oder die neutestamentliche Textforschung. Am Institut für Geschichtswissenschaften der Humboldt-Universit t zu Berlin besch ftigen sich die dort angesiedelten Projekte H-Soz-u-Kult und dessen Tr gerverein Clio-online - Historisches Fachinformationssystem e.V. seit Beginn 2009 mit dem Thema; nach einem positiven Bescheid der DFG über die finanzielle F rderung zur überführung der im Rahmen von Clio-online, H-Soz-u-Kult und damit verbundenen Projekten entwickelten Fachinformations- und Kommunikationsdienste in eine Virtuelle Forschungsumgebung“ steht seit Januar 2011 deren praktische Umsetzung auf der Agenda des auf zwei Jahre angelegten Infrastrukturprojekts.
On the semantics of merging
Thomas Meyer
Computer Science , 2000,
Abstract: Intelligent agents are often faced with the problem of trying to merge possibly conflicting pieces of information obtained from different sources into a consistent view of the world. We propose a framework for the modelling of such merging operations with roots in the work of Spohn (1988, 1991). Unlike most approaches we focus on the merging of epistemic states, not knowledge bases. We construct a number of plausible merging operations and measure them against various properties that merging operations ought to satisfy. Finally, we discuss the connection between merging and the use of infobases Meyer (1999) and Meyer et al. (2000).
Perioperative blood pressure management with clevidipine during coiling of cerebral artery aneurysms
Meyer Thomas,Tobias Joseph
Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia , 2009,
Abstract: The tight control of blood pressure (BP) is mandatory during cerebral aneurysm coiling to minimize abrupt changes in the transmural pressure across the aneurysm and thereby decrease the risk of rupture. Critical times during these procedures when significant BP changes may occur include anesthetic induction, endotracheal intubation, and emergence. Clevidipine is a recently introduced, rapidly acting dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist. Its rapid metabolism by tissue and plasma esterases results in an effective half-life of 1 to 3 minutes. We present our preliminary experience with the use of clevidipine to control BP during the anesthetic care of three patients undergoing coiling of cerebral aneurysms in the interventional radiology suite.
The Cardinality of Infinite Games
Thomas Kellam Meyer
Mathematics , 2009,
Abstract: The focus of this essay is a rigorous treatment of infinite games. An infinite game is defined as a play consisting of a fixed number of players whose sequence of moves is repeated, or iterated ad infinitum. Each sequence corresponds to a single iteration of the play, where there are an infinite amount of iterations. There are two distinct concepts within this broad definition which encompass all infinite games: the strong infinite game and the weak infinite game. Both differ in terms of imputations. The strong infinite game has a uniqueness qualification in that all moves must differ to the extent that no imputation (these occur at the end of any given iteration) may ever be the same. Conversely, there is no such qualification in a weak infinite game, any payout may equal another. Another property shared by strong and weak infinite games (apart from their fulfilling the criterion of an infinite game) is the fact that both consist of a countably infinite amount of moves. Therefore all infinite games have a countably infinite number of turns; the set of all infinite games is composed of each strong and weak infinite game. This result has a very important consequence: the ordinality of turns. That is, the moves of an infinite game have an order or structure which they adhere to. It is this structure which provides any future development or game theoretical analysis of these sorts of games with the necessary foundation.
Cryptographic Implications for Artificially Mediated Games
Thomas Kellam Meyer
Computer Science , 2009,
Abstract: There is currently an intersection in the research of game theory and cryptography. Generally speaking, there are two aspects to this partnership. First there is the application of game theory to cryptography. Yet, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the second aspect, the converse of the first, the application of cryptography to game theory. Chiefly, there exist a branch of non-cooperative games which have a correlated equilibrium as their solution. These equilibria tend to be superior to the conventional Nash equilibria. The primary condition for a correlated equilibrium is the presence of a mediator within the game. This is simply a neutral and mutually trusted entity. It is the role of the mediator to make recommendations in terms of strategy profiles to all players, who then act (supposedly) on this advice. Each party privately provides the mediator with the necessary information, and the referee responds privately with their optimized strategy set. However, there seem to be a multitude of situations in which no mediator could exist. Thus, games modeling these sorts of cases could not use these entities as tools for analysis. Yet, if these equilibria are in the best interest of players, it would be rational to construct a machine, or protocol, to calculate them. Of course, this machine would need to satisfy some standard for secure transmission between a player and itself. The requirement that no third party could detect either the input or strategy profile would need to be satisfied by this scheme. Here is the synthesis of cryptography into game theory; analyzing the ability of the players to construct a protocol which can be used successfully in the place of a mediator.
The Human Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori and Its Association with Gastric Cancer and Ulcer Disease
Bianca Bauer,Thomas F. Meyer
Ulcers , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/340157
Abstract: With the momentous discovery in the 1980's that a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, can cause peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, antibiotic therapies and prophylactic measures have been successful, only in part, in reducing the global burden of these diseases. To date, ~700,000 deaths worldwide are still attributable annually to gastric cancer alone. Here, we review H. pylori's contribution to the epidemiology and histopathology of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Furthermore, we examine the host-pathogen relationship and H. pylori biology in context of these diseases, focusing on strain differences, virulence factors (CagA and VacA), immune activation and the challenges posed by resistance to existing therapies. We consider also the important role of host-genetic variants, for example, in inflammatory response genes, in determining infection outcome and the role of H. pylori in other pathologies—some accepted, for example, MALT lymphoma, and others more controversial, for example, idiopathic thrombocytic purpura. More recently, intriguing suggestions that H. pylori has protective effects in GERD and autoimmune diseases, such as asthma, have gained momentum. Therefore, we consider the basis for these suggestions and discuss the potential impact for future therapeutic rationales.
Nota sobre la conferencia: "Etnografía etnológica vs. sociológica. Estableciendo el alcance y potencial de la distinción" Conference Report: "Ethnological vs. Sociological Ethnography—Considering Scope and Potential for Distinction" Tagungsbericht: "Soziologische vs. ethnologische Ethnographie – Zur Belastbarkeit und Perspektive einer Unterscheidung"
Thomas Scheffer,Christian Christian Meyer
Forum : Qualitative Social Research , 2010,
Abstract: Las apropiaciones disciplinarias respectivas del enfoque etnográfico en etnología y sociología fueron el centro de este taller. Este reporte presenta los contrates y semejanzas discutidas. Sobre esta base, se exploran profundamente las diferencias sistemáticas usando la tríada: campo, lugar y objeto de investigación. El reporte finaliza se alando los temas centrales para el debate en el taller del 2011. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101256 The respective disciplinary appropriations of the ethnographic approach in ethnology and sociology formed the core of the workshop. The following report lays out the contrasts and similarities debated. On this basis, it explores deeper systematic differences using the conceptual triad of field, site, and research object. The report concludes with core themes for debate in a follow-up workshop in 2011. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101256 Zentraler Gegenstand der Tagung waren die disziplin ren Aneignungen der ethnografischen Herangehensweise in der Ethnologie und der Soziologie. Der Tagungsbericht sammelt die auf der Tagung debattierten Differenzen und hnlichkeiten und sichtet die tiefer liegenden, systematischen Unterschiede entlang der ethnografischen Trias von Feld, Site und Gegenstand. Mit Blick auf eine geplante Folgetagung identifizieren die Autoren Schlüsselthemen für die weitere Debatte. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101256
The Human Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori and Its Association with Gastric Cancer and Ulcer Disease
Bianca Bauer,Thomas F. Meyer
Ulcers , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/340157
Abstract: With the momentous discovery in the 1980's that a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, can cause peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, antibiotic therapies and prophylactic measures have been successful, only in part, in reducing the global burden of these diseases. To date, ~700,000 deaths worldwide are still attributable annually to gastric cancer alone. Here, we review H. pylori's contribution to the epidemiology and histopathology of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Furthermore, we examine the host-pathogen relationship and H. pylori biology in context of these diseases, focusing on strain differences, virulence factors (CagA and VacA), immune activation and the challenges posed by resistance to existing therapies. We consider also the important role of host-genetic variants, for example, in inflammatory response genes, in determining infection outcome and the role of H. pylori in other pathologies—some accepted, for example, MALT lymphoma, and others more controversial, for example, idiopathic thrombocytic purpura. More recently, intriguing suggestions that H. pylori has protective effects in GERD and autoimmune diseases, such as asthma, have gained momentum. Therefore, we consider the basis for these suggestions and discuss the potential impact for future therapeutic rationales. 1. Introduction After a long history of discoveries on the pathology and bacterial colonization of the gastric mucosa starting in the beginning of the last century [1], the gastroenterologist Barry Marshall and the pathologist Robin Warren, in the 1980’s, fulfilled Koch’s postulates for the association between gastritis and the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori [1–3]. This decisive demonstration substantially changed our views of the microbiology and pathology of the human stomach and resulted in Marshall and Warren receiving the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. Marshall and Warren’s discovery founded the concept that infection with H. pylori , and not (if at all, very indirectly) stress, can lead to a variety of upper gastrointestinal disorders (Figure 1) such as gastric inflammation (gastritis), peptic ulcer disease (10%–20%), distal gastric adenocarcinoma (1%-2%), and gastric mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (<1%) [4–7]. These insights not only dramatically improved the management and therapy of gastric diseases but also provided an invaluable key for deeper insights into the pathogenesis of chronic infections. Moreover, during the past 20 years of research, the initially tentative association between persistent H.
Analysis of spine loads in dentistry—impact of an altered sitting position of the dentist  [PDF]
Max Wunderlich, Thomas Eger, Thomas Rüther, Andreas Meyer-Falcke, Dieter Leyk
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2010.37090
Abstract: Neck and low back pain causes highest disability rates in industrialized countries. Apart from blue-collar occupations dentists and dental care personnel are also strongly affected by work related back pain. However, due to missing analysing systems spine exposure could not be adequately estimated for sitting and non load bearing tasks. Therefore, a new biomechanical measurement system was developed to analyze spine and trunk kinematics. To explore the potential kinematics impact on the spine two days of periodontology care have been examined. Moreover, to asses the influence of an altered sitting position data was collected in 9 (day 1) and 12 (day 2) o’clock position. Data were collected and analyzed by the new 3D-SpineMoveGuard. The systems analyze postures and movements of spine and trunk by ultrasound and inclinometer. Two days of routine non-surgical periodontal treatment were recorded by a frequency of 10 Hz. Moderate awkward postures could be assessed for 90% of the treatment. Up to 85% of the working days were spent in isometric position. Movements were rare and of small amplitude. There were no relevant differences between 9 and 12 o’clock position. The frequently reported back pain in dentists is not only related to severe body postures rather than to the high amount of isometric spine loads. Moreover, an altered sitting position did not reduce this physiological stress. Therefore, dentist specific interventions concepts should pay more attention to physical training during and off work. Ergonomic investments should be carefully evaluated before implemented.
MAPK signalling in rheumatoid joint destruction: can we unravel the puzzle?
Lars-Henrik Meyer, Thomas Pap
Arthritis Research & Therapy , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/ar1810
Abstract: Although all three mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) families – p38, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) – seem to be involved in the activation of synovial cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the main pathways involved in the regulation of joint destruction are incompletely understood. In this issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy, Goertz and colleagues report some important novel data on MAPK activation in arthritic mice transgenic for human tumour necrosis factor-α (hTNFtg mice) [1]. With the use of Western blotting and immuno-histochemistry, they show that p38 MAPK and ERK are the primarily activated MAPKs. Although activation of p38 MAPK is more dominant in synovial macrophages, phosphorylated ERK is also found at increased levels in synovial fibroblasts. JNK activation is induced much less by chronic exposure to tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Applying cytokine blockers to inhibit TNF-α-induced MAPK activation, the authors show a significantly reduced activation of p38 MAPK and ERK in the synovial membrane by antibodies against TNF-α.Expression of MAPKs has previously been described at elevated levels in the RA synovium, and data from different animal models suggest important yet distinct roles of the three MAPKs in destructive arthritis. However, several questions about the regulation of joint destruction by MAPKs remain unanswered. Thus, the predominant regulation of collagenases (particularly matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13) by JNK as suggested by Han and co-workers [2] seems to contrast with previous studies by Mengshol and colleagues from the group of Constance Brinckerhoff. The latter have demonstrated a pivotal role of p38 MAPK in the regulation of MMP-13 in human chondrocytes [3]. The differences have been attributed in part to the peculiarities of the rodent system. It has been suggested that, because of the lack of a homologue to the human MMP-1 in rat and mice, the regulation of collagenases is differe
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