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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 322450 matches for " Thomas J. Roffe "
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Shared Bacterial and Viral Respiratory Agents in Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis), Domestic Sheep (Ovis aries), and Goats (Capra hircus) in Montana
David S. Miller,Glen C. Weiser,Keith Aune,Brent Roeder,Mark Atkinson,Neil Anderson,Thomas J. Roffe,Kim A. Keating,Phillip L. Chapman,Cleon Kimberling,Jack Rhyan,P. Ryan Clarke
Veterinary Medicine International , 2011, DOI: 10.4061/2011/162520
Abstract: Transmission of infectious agents from livestock reservoirs has been hypothesized to cause respiratory disease outbreaks in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), and land management policies intended to limit this transmission have proven controversial. This cross-sectional study compares the infectious agents present in multiple populations of bighorn sheep near to and distant from their interface with domestic sheep (O. aries) and domestic goat (Capra hircus) and provides critical baseline information needed for interpretations of cross-species transmission risks. Bighorn sheep and livestock shared exposure to Pasteurellaceae, viral, and endoparasite agents. In contrast, although the impact is uncertain, Mycoplasma sp. was isolated from livestock but not bighorn sheep. These results may be the result of historic cross-species transmission of agents that has resulted in a mosaic of endemic and exotic agents. Future work using longitudinal and multiple population comparisons is needed to rigorously establish the risk of outbreaks from cross-species transmission of infectious agents. 1. Introduction Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) experienced substantial decreases in population numbers and range in the 19th and the early 20th centuries, and subsequent recovery efforts have often been limited by large-scale die-offs [1–3]. These initial population declines were associated with settlement of western North America and were attributed to unregulated hunting, competition for forage with domestic sheep (O. aries) and other livestock, and disruption of historic bighorn sheep migration patterns due to development. Clinical disease was apparently unimportant or was underreported in these early declines, though die-offs of bighorn sheep associated with sheep scab (Psoroptes sp.) were reported following settlement [4, 5]. Bighorn sheep die-offs associated with pneumonia were reported in the 1920s and 1930s [6–10]. These early reports and subsequent work largely focused on lungworm (Protostrongylus sp.) as the primary infectious agent, although the involvement of Pasteurella sp., Corynebacterium pyogenes (currently Arcanobacterium pyogenes), and other host and environmental determinants were also noted as potential causes of respiratory disease. Subsequently, inconsistent association of lungworm with respiratory disease in bighorn sheep, as well as further evidence for Pasteurella sp. as the cause of pneumonia, led to a focus on pasteurellosis as a cause of respiratory disease outbreaks [11–14]. This research included evidence that Pasteurella sp. strains from clinically
Alain Badiou's Being and Event (Book Review)
Jon Roffe
Cosmos and History : the Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy , 2006,
Abstract: Much like the parade of claimants for the hand of Penelope in Homer’s Odyssey, the theoretical humanities have been presented with a string of would-be ma tres à pensers, each bringing with them claims of radical originality, and the promise of hope for the disciplines in question. Not only is the philosophy of Alain Badiou among the very few who have serious justifications to the claim of originality, the rigour, scope and goals of his philosophy reveal him as the first thinker in a long time to have the resources necessary to engage with the ailments of theoretical discourse in the contemporary environment of global capitalism, and the steady dismantling of the traditional infrastructure of the human sciences and philosophy. This article provides an outline of the key positions espoused in Badiou's key work Being and Event, and an assessment of its contemporary import.
Alain Badiou's Being and Event
Jon Roffe
Cosmos and History : the Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy , 2006,
Abstract: Much like the parade of claimants for the hand of Penelope in Homerrsquo;s Odyssey, the theoretical humanities have been presented with a string of would-be maicirc;tres agrave; pensers, each bringing with them claims of radical originality, and the promise of hope for the disciplines in question. Not only is the philosophy of Alain Badiou among the very few who have serious justifications to the claim of originality, the rigour, scope and goals of his philosophy reveal him as the first thinker in a long time to have thenbsp; resources necessary to engage with the ailments of theoretical discourse in the contemporary environment of global capitalism, and the steady dismantling of the traditional infrastructure of the human sciences and philosophy. This article provides an outline of the key positions espoused in Badiou#39;s key work Being and Event, and an assessment of its contemporary import.
On the Temperature Dependent Excitation and Reflection Spectra of Ln3Al5O12:Ce3+ Ceramics (Ln = Y, Lu) for White LEDs  [PDF]
Thomas Jansen, Thomas Jüstel
Materials Sciences and Applications (MSA) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/msa.2014.514110
Abstract: Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and Lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG) doped with Ce3+ are widely applied phosphor powders or ceramics for the conversion of blue into green to yellow light in the rapidly expanding market of white light emitting high power LEDs. Surprisingly, the temperature dependent reflection and excitation spectra of these well-established materials have not been investigated until today. In this work, we report the temperature dependence of the reflection and excitation spectra of Ce3+ doped YAG and LuAG in the temperature range from 300 to 800 K.
Historic Charcoal Production in the US and Forest Depletion: Development of Production Parameters  [PDF]
Thomas J. Straka
Advances in Historical Studies (AHS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ahs.2014.32010
Abstract: Charcoal was the fuel of choice for the early nineteenth century for iron making and smelting of other metals in the United States. The industry involved massive amount of woodcutting and entire woodlands were depleted. The problem is somewhat exaggerated in the literature. While forest destruction tended to be quite complete near smelters and furnaces, it was generally localized near the demand for the fuel. Many authors attempt to equate furnace production to forest area depletion as one measure of environmental destruction. This is not as easy as it appears. The mathematics seems simple and uses a few basic ratios: furnace yield or bushels of charcoal needed to produce a ton of output; charcoal yield or bushels of charcoal produced from a cord of wood, and forest yield or cubic meters per ha. Different furnaces, colliers, and forests have different yields. Production parameters are critical to estimate productivity and costs. These parameters are discussed in terms of estimation problems and average expected values. This valuable information will make estimation of forest area use in charcoal production more reliable.
Forest History Snapshot: Forest Industry Woodlands Operations Locations Prior to Mergers and Acquistions  [PDF]
Thomas J. Straka
Advances in Historical Studies (AHS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ahs.2013.24024
Abstract: Forestry industry was a major owner of timberland in the United States over most of the twentieth century. This timberland was seen as a cost-effective means to supply their lumber and pulp mills. They were an important owner, with some of the most productive and intensively-managed timberlands in the country. Beginning in the 1980s, other investors realized the value of timberland assets and actively pursued acquisition of the forest products companies and their timberland assets. Mergers and acquisitions were common within the industry as a means to discourage takeovers. These timberlands were traditionally managed by woodlands operations located near the mills. These operations defined classic timber towns, with names like Crossett, Georgetown, Bogalusa, and Millinocket becoming synonymous with the mill and the woodlands. Woodlands operations are nearly extinct as few mills still own timberlands; what might remain is a small wood procurement organization at the same location. These woodlands operations were an important part of forest history and their locations provide much insight into the historical patterns of industrial forest management. Major forest industry woodlands operations are identified by geography and size as a means to record a fading historical artifact of forest history.
Electrical Stimulation Greatly Increases Settlement, Growth, Survival, and Stress Resistance of Marine Organisms  [PDF]
Thomas J. Goreau
Natural Resources (NR) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/nr.2014.510048
Abstract:
Increasing stress from global warming, sea level rise, acidification, sedimentation, pollution, and unsustainable practices have degraded the most critical coastal ecosystems including coral reefs, oyster reefs, and salt marshes. Conventional restoration methods work only under perfect conditions, but fail nearly completely when the water becomes too hot or water quality deteriorates. New methods are needed to greatly increase settlement, growth, survival, and resistance to environmental stress of keystone marine organisms in order to maintain critical coastal ecosystem functions including shore protection, fisheries, and biodiversity. Electrolysis methods have been applied to marine ecosystem restoration since 1976, with spectacular results (Figures 1(a)-(c)). This paper provides the first overall review of the data. Low-voltage direct current trickle charges are found to increase the settlement of corals 25.86 times higher than uncharged control sites, to increase the mean growth rates of reef-building corals, soft corals, oysters, and salt marsh grass— an average of 3.17 times faster than controls (ranging from 2 to 10 times depending on species and conditions), and to increase the survival of electrically charged marine organisms—an average of 3.47 times greater than controls, with the biggest increases under the most severe environmental stresses. These results are caused by the fundamental biophysical stimulation of natural biochemical energy production pathways, used by all organisms, provided by electrical stimulation under the right conditions. This paper reviews for the first time all published results from properly designed, installed, and maintained projects, and contrasts them with those that do not meet these criteria.
Maintaining an Optimal Flow of Forest Products under a Carbon Market: Approximating a Pareto Set of Optimal Silvicultural Regimes for Eucalyptus fastigata  [PDF]
Oliver Chikumbo, Thomas J. Straka
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2012.23017
Abstract: A competitive co-evolutionary Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (cc-MOGA) was used to approximate a Pareto front of efficient silvicultural regimes for Eucalyptus fastigata. The three objectives to be maximised included, sawlog, pulpwood and carbon sequestration payment. Three carbon price scenarios (3CPS), i.e. NZ $25, NZ $50 and NZ $100 for a tonne of CO2 sequestered, were used to assess the impact on silvicultural regimes, against a fourth non-carbon Pareto set of efficient regimes (nonCPS), determined from a cc-MOGA with two objectives, i.e. competing sawlog and pulpwood productions. Carbon prices included in stand valuation were found to influence the silvicultural regimes by increasing the rotation length and lowering the final crop number before clearfell. However, there were no significant changes in the frequency, timing, and intensity of thinning operations amongst all the four Pareto sets of solutions. However, the 3CPS were not significantly different from each other, which meant that these silvicultural regimes were insensitive to the price of carbon. This was because maximising carbon sequestration was directly related to the biological growth rate. As such an optimal mix of frequency, intensity, and timing of thinning maintained maximum growth rate for as long as possible for any one rotation.
Anaesthesia for the child with congenital heart disease: Pointers and pitfalls
J Thomas
Continuing Medical Education , 2011,
Abstract: No
Practical perioperative pain control in children and adults
J Thomas
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia , 2008,
Abstract: Pain is soul-destroying. No patient should have to endure intense pain unnecessarily. The quality of mercy is essential to the practice of medicine. Here of all places it should not be strained. The Quality of Mercy
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