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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2854 matches for " Thierry VandenDriessche "
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Raltitrexed + irinotecan as second-line chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced colorectal cancer  [PDF]
Barbara Vandendriessche, Filip Geurs, Ingeborg Hilderson
Modern Chemotherapy (MC) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/mc.2012.12002
Abstract: Aims and Background: Irinotecan is a standard option for relapsed/refractory advanced colo- rectal cancer. Combination with raltitrexed and irinotecan at lower than MTD doses should preserve disease stabilisation while decreasing toxicity. Patients and Methods: From January 2004 to April 2009, we analyzed, retrospectively, our data on irinotecan + raltitrexed, fixed doses, as a second-line chemotherapy in elderly pa- tients (>70 years) with advanced colorectal can- cer after failure of oxaliplatin based chemothera- py twenty-three patients were evaluated. Iri- notecan 350 mg + raltitrexed 2.6 mg were given every 3 weeks. Tumo r measurements were ob- tained after every third course of therapy. Toxic- ity was assessed weekly using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, ver- sion 2. Results: The median number of treatment courses received per patient was 4 (range, 1 - 8). All pa-tients were assessable for toxicity and 21 for response. The most frequently observed severetoxicities were diarrhea (grade 2, 13%) No cases of significant neutropenia occurred. Ob- jective partial responses were observed in 3 pa- tients (13%). An additional 10 patients (43%) had stable disease as their best response. To date, 12 patients have progressed with a median time- to-progression of 4.3 months and a median sur- vival of 8.3 months. Conclusions: A three weekly irinotecan + raltitrexed administration can indu- ce tumor control in elderly patients with advanc- ed colorectalcancer that has progressed during or shortly after oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The diarrhea by irinotecan, seems mitigated by coad-ministration of a smaller dose of raltitrexed
Repression of Cardiac Hypertrophy by KLF15: Underlying Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications
Joost J. Leenders, Wino J. Wijnen, Ingeborg van der Made, Monika Hiller, Melissa Swinnen, Thierry Vandendriessche, Marinee Chuah, Yigal M. Pinto, Esther E. Creemers
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036754
Abstract: The Kruppel-like factor (KLF) family of transcription factors regulates diverse cell biological processes including proliferation, differentiation, survival and growth. Previous studies have shown that KLF15 inhibits cardiac hypertrophy by repressing the activity of pivotal cardiac transcription factors such as GATA4, MEF2 and myocardin. We set out this study to characterize the interaction of KLF15 with putative other transcription factors. We first show that KLF15 interacts with myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) and strongly represses the transcriptional activity of MRTF-A and MRTF-B. Second, we identified a region within the C-terminal zinc fingers of KLF15 that contains the nuclear localization signal. Third, we investigated whether overexpression of KLF15 in the heart would have therapeutic potential. Using recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) we have overexpressed KLF15 specifically in the mouse heart and provide the first evidence that elevation of cardiac KLF15 levels prevents the development of cardiac hypertrophy in a model of Angiotensin II induced hypertrophy.
Quantum synchronizable codes from finite geometries
Yuichiro Fujiwara,Peter Vandendriessche
Computer Science , 2013, DOI: 10.1109/TIT.2014.2357029
Abstract: Quantum synchronizable error-correcting codes are special quantum error-correcting codes that are designed to correct both the effect of quantum noise on qubits and misalignment in block synchronization. It is known that in principle such a code can be constructed through a combination of a classical linear code and its subcode if the two are both cyclic and dual-containing. However, finding such classical codes that lead to promising quantum synchronizable error-correcting codes is not a trivial task. In fact, although there are two families of classical codes that are proved to produce quantum synchronizable codes with good minimum distances and highest possible tolerance against misalignment, their code lengths have been restricted to primes and Mersenne numbers. In this paper, examining the incidence vectors of projective spaces over the finite fields of characteristic $2$, we give quantum synchronizable codes from cyclic codes whose lengths are not primes or Mersenne numbers. These projective geometric codes achieve good performance in quantum error correction and possess the best possible ability to recover synchronization, thereby enriching the variety of good quantum synchronizable codes. We also extend the current knowledge of cyclic codes in classical coding theory by explicitly giving generator polynomials of the finite geometric codes and completely characterizing the minimum weight nonzero codewords. In addition to the codes based on projective spaces, we carry out a similar analysis on the well-known cyclic codes from Euclidean spaces that are known to be majority logic decodable and determine their exact minimum distances.
Atonal homolog 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene
Wouter Bossuyt,Avedis Kazanjian,Natalie De Geest,Sofie Van Kelst,Gert De Hertogh,Karel Geboes,Greg P. Boivin,Judith Luciani,Francois Fuks,Marinee Chuah,Thierry VandenDriessche,Peter Marynen,Jan Cools,Noah F. Shroyer,Bassem A. Hassan
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000039
Abstract: Colon cancer accounts for more than 10% of all cancer deaths annually. Our genetic evidence from Drosophila and previous in vitro studies of mammalian Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also called Math1 or Hath1) suggest an anti-oncogenic function for the Atonal group of proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. We asked whether mouse Atoh1 and human ATOH1 act as tumor suppressor genes in vivo. Genetic knockouts in mouse and molecular analyses in the mouse and in human cancer cell lines support a tumor suppressor function for ATOH1. ATOH1 antagonizes tumor formation and growth by regulating proliferation and apoptosis, likely via activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, colorectal cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma patients show genetic and epigenetic ATOH1 loss-of-function mutations. Our data indicate that ATOH1 may be an early target for oncogenic mutations in tissues where it instructs cellular differentiation.
Atonal homolog 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene
Wouter Bossuyt equal contributor,Avedis Kazanjian equal contributor,Natalie De Geest,Sofie Van Kelst,Gert De Hertogh,Karel Geboes,Greg P Boivin,Judith Luciani,Francois Fuks,Marinee Chuah,Thierry VandenDriessche,Peter Marynen,Jan Cools,Noah F Shroyer ,Bassem A Hassan
PLOS Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000039
Abstract: Colon cancer accounts for more than 10% of all cancer deaths annually. Our genetic evidence from Drosophila and previous in vitro studies of mammalian Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also called Math1 or Hath1) suggest an anti-oncogenic function for the Atonal group of proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. We asked whether mouse Atoh1 and human ATOH1 act as tumor suppressor genes in vivo. Genetic knockouts in mouse and molecular analyses in the mouse and in human cancer cell lines support a tumor suppressor function for ATOH1. ATOH1 antagonizes tumor formation and growth by regulating proliferation and apoptosis, likely via activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, colorectal cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma patients show genetic and epigenetic ATOH1 loss-of-function mutations. Our data indicate that ATOH1 may be an early target for oncogenic mutations in tissues where it instructs cellular differentiation.
Current Noise in Thick and Thin Film Resistors
S. Demolder,A. Van Calster,M. Vandendriessche
Active and Passive Electronic Components , 1983, DOI: 10.1155/apec.10.81
Abstract:
High-rate quantum low-density parity-check codes assisted by reliable qubits
Yuichiro Fujiwara,Alexander Gruner,Peter Vandendriessche
Computer Science , 2013, DOI: 10.1109/TIT.2015.2398436
Abstract: Quantum error correction is an important building block for reliable quantum information processing. A challenging hurdle in the theory of quantum error correction is that it is significantly more difficult to design error-correcting codes with desirable properties for quantum information processing than for traditional digital communications and computation. A typical obstacle to constructing a variety of strong quantum error-correcting codes is the complicated restrictions imposed on the structure of a code. Recently, promising solutions to this problem have been proposed in quantum information science, where in principle any binary linear code can be turned into a quantum error-correcting code by assuming a small number of reliable quantum bits. This paper studies how best to take advantage of these latest ideas to construct desirable quantum error-correcting codes of very high information rate. Our methods exploit structured high-rate low-density parity-check codes available in the classical domain and provide quantum analogues that inherit their characteristic low decoding complexity and high error correction performance even at moderate code lengths. Our approach to designing high-rate quantum error-correcting codes also allows for making direct use of other major syndrome decoding methods for linear codes, making it possible to deal with a situation where promising quantum analogues of low-density parity-check codes are difficult to find.
Hematite, Biotite and Cinnabar on the Face of the Turin Shroud: Microscopy and SEM-EDX Analysis  [PDF]
Gérard Lucotte, Thierry Derouin, Thierry Thomasset
Open Journal of Applied Sciences (OJAppS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ojapps.2016.69059
Abstract: The Turin Shroud, recently accessible for hands-on scientific research, is now extensively investigated. Its pinkish red blood stains that seem anomalous ones are studied by modern techniques (notably by resolute optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray). Exploration by these techniques of a blood stain located on the face permits us to discover some red-colour particles (hematite, biotite and cinnabar) of exogenous material in this stain. We finally characterize these red-colour particles and try to explain their presences in the blood stain. Globally, all these red-colour particles cannot explain all of the reddish appearance of the area under study.
Discrete Evolutionary Genetics: Multiplicative Fitnesses and the Mutation-Fitness Balance  [PDF]
Thierry Huillet, Servet Martinez
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/am.2011.21002
Abstract: We revisit the multi-allelic mutation-fitness balance problem especially when fitnesses are multiplicative. Using ideas arising from quasi-stationary distributions, we analyze the qualitative differences between the fitness-first and mutation-first models, under various schemes of the mutation pattern. We give some stochastic domination relations between the equilibrium states resulting from these models.
Energy and Emergy Analysis to Evaluate Sustainability of Small Wastewater Treatment Plants: Application to a Constructed Wetland and a Sequencing Batch Reactor  [PDF]
Gerard Merlin, Thierry Lissolo
Journal of Water Resource and Protection (JWARP) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2010.212120
Abstract: The aim of this study is to assess the sustainability of two wastewater treatment systems by energy and emergy analyses. The first system is a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) which is a concrete and electricity dependent intensive process. The second is a constructed wetland, usually considered as an extensive process. The two studied facilities have similar treatment capacity and removal efficiencies. This study sheds new light on the comparison of wastewater treatment plants. We defined a new unit, the “Functional Efficiency Index” (or FEI) to describe the energetic efficiency of the facilities, expressed in kJ per year and per kg of removed COD. The energy analysis showed that, after its construction, the constructed wetland system uses only renewable energy, in marked contrast to the SBR, totally dependent on electricity which is considered here as a non renewable. The emergy analysis showed no significant differences between the two processes, but energy and emergy indices are in favour of the constructed wetland process and thus confirm its sustainability.
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