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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 64 matches for " Tarmo Jarvilehto "
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Jumping numbers of a simple complete ideal in a two-dimensional regular local ring
Tarmo Jarvilehto
Mathematics , 2006,
Abstract: In this manuscript we shall give an explicit formula for the jumping numbers of a simple complete ideal in a two-dimensional regular local ring. In particular, we obtain a formula for the jumping numbers of an analytically irreducible plane curve. We then show that the jumping numbers determine the equisingularity class of the curve.
Conceptions of Soul in Old Estonian Religion.
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 1997,
Abstract:
About the comparison of the state authority and social organization by Incas and Aztecs
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 2010,
Abstract: During the period under consideration (1438–1532) the Inca state inPeru was politically a highly centralized empire with strong central government. Its social structure was that of an early class society with some communal traits; the government’s intervention in social life was prevalent, village communities were put in the service of the government, horizontal mobility was regulated and vertical mobility was all but non-existent. It represented a socalledearly totalitarian state. The Aztec state in Mexico, during the period under consideration (1427–1519), was a confederation with weak central authority where the core of the confederation used conquered territories as a sort of economic backup. Their social organization represented an early class society with strong communal traits, little interference from the government in the daily life of the community, few opportunities for horizontal mobility, but vertical mobility was quite possible. As such it was a state that had retained many features of a military democracy.
Totalitarianism and the Role of Religion in the Inca State
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 2003,
Abstract:
The Deity of Sky: One Way to Interpret the Moche Iconography
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 1999,
Abstract:
On the Role of Creation and Origin Myths in the Development Of Inca State And Religion
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 1999,
Abstract:
On Supreme Sky God from the Aspect of Religious History and in Prehistoric Estonian Material
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 2005,
Abstract: According to basic religious-phenomenological principles a supreme beingresides in heaven or is the heaven, an omnipotent creator, who is often as-signed the function of thunder, is called either Father or Grandfather, is sac-rificed the primal offering, and has turned into deus otiosus.Comparative linguistics has revealed that the earliest conception of a Balto-Finnic and Estonian supreme god dates back to the Finno-Volgaic etymologi-cal stratum, to the Neolithic period (3rd millennium BC), in archaeologicalterms. This is evidenced by the Estonian word juma(l) ‘god’, which had for-merly signified heaven, but also the Indo-European loan taevas ‘heaven’ inthe Estonian language. The divergence of the con-ception of thunder god Ukuor Ukko apparently took place in the 1st mil-lennium BC; this is also indi-cated by archaeological data. According to the 13th-century Henrici ChroniconLivoniae and other chronicles the thun-der god of the coastal Estonians hasalso been called Taara or Tooru, which may be a derivation of the OldScandinavian Thor.
On the Writing Systems of Ancient Peru: The Possibility of the Quellqa and the Quipu as an Instrument of Power of the Incas
Tarmo Kulmar
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 2008,
Abstract: The focus is laid on the role and significance of both the knot-scriptquipu and the hypothetical writing system quellqa in the governing of the Incan state, and also on the reasons why the Incas preferred the quipu to a more flexible system of writing. The author uses data from the chronicles of the period of Spanish conquest and views from scientific researchers.It is probable that the use of quellqa was banned by the order of Inca Pachacutec Yupanqui or Inca Tupac Yupanqui around 1470 in connection with the subjugation of the powerful Chimú state in northern Peru and among its allies. The aim of the Incas was to prevent a wider spread of this system of information exchange, which was readily available and convenient to use.In its stead, the Incas favoured the use of the traditional mnemotechnical device quipu, which was known to the previous civilisations in Peru, because its practical uses were limited. The teaching, learning, and use of the quipu were subjected to the strict control of a special organ of government. This served the political interests of the early totalitarian state.
Sauadega jumalus - problemaatiline kuju Mochika usundis.
Tarmo Kulmar
M?etagused. Hüperajakiri , 1998,
Abstract: The Mochika culture is one of the oldest and most problematic among Peru's pre-Columbus cultures. Its center was situated in the northern coast in the valley of the river Moche, not far from the current city Trujillo. The first monuments of the Mochika culture were discovered in 1900 by Max Uhle, one of the founders of Peru's national science of archaeology. Back then, as the oldest civilization of Peru – Chavin – had not been discovered yet, Uhle came forth with the so-called immigrational theory according to which Peru's civilizations, including Mochika have received their initial influence from Meso-America. After Julio Tello's discoveries in 1919, the autochthonic theory of the forthcoming of Peru's civilizations started to predominate. The god with staves appears for the first time in Peru in the Chavin era (900 BC - 200 AD). Its classical figure is known by the so-called Raimond's stele. It is a god depicted holding a staff or stick in both hands. Other exterior features may vary by cultures.
Kolm vana-peruu kultuurihorisonti - kas ka kolm erinevat religiooni?
Tarmo Kulmar
M?etagused. Hüperajakiri , 1999,
Abstract: The influence of the Chavin religion to the religion of Tiahuanaco is of principle nature. The Paracas religion seems to have a smaller impact, still, its significance can not be underestimated. Thus it is rational to view these three as the sc kindred religions, i.e. the Peruvian religion of the middle horizon is merely a further elaboration of the religions of the earlier horizons and they are the two layers of the same pre-Incan religion.The Tiahuanaco religion has influenced the Inca religion in a number of ways and although they seem to be important at first the influence is somewhat secondary, despite of the fact that the Inca culture and that of Tiahuanaco were kindred cultures. In the course of founding the Empire of Tahuantinsuyu a totally new religion emerged on the basis of the pre-Incan religion. Thus, the religion of the Incas is radically different - it is the religion of a totalitarian state.Consequently, the answer is the following: three cultural horizons - two religions.
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