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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 365 matches for " Tammy Gregersen "
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A cross-cultural comparison of nonverbal teacher immediacy and foreign language anxiety in Chilean and Russian English language classrooms
Gregersen,Tammy;
Revista signos , 2006, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-09342006000300004
Abstract: this cross-cultural study examines instructor nonverbal immediacy in chilean and russian english classrooms and its relationship to foreign language anxiety. participants included 84 undergraduate university students (33 chilean students enrolled at a small state university in northern chile; and 51 russian students enrolled at a large state university in moscow). results indicate that: (a) chilean students receiving instruction from chilean professors perceive a significantly greater amount of instructor nonverbal immediacy than russian students who receive instruction from russian instructors; (b) chilean students self-reporte significantly higher levels of foreign language anxiety than their russian counterparts; and (c) foreign language anxiety is only slightly negatively correlated with one nonverbal teacher immediacy item in the russian population and is not correlated with any items in the chilean sample. conclusions focus on the important role that culture plays in classroom language teaching and the implications for teacher training.
A cross-cultural comparison of nonverbal teacher immediacy and foreign language anxiety in Chilean and Russian English language classrooms Una comparación transcultural de la urgencia no verbal del profesor y de la ansiedad del estudiante de inglés en salas de clase chilenas y rusas
Tammy Gregersen
Revista Signos , 2006,
Abstract: This cross-cultural study examines instructor nonverbal immediacy in Chilean and Russian English classrooms and its relationship to Foreign Language Anxiety. Participants included 84 undergraduate university students (33 Chilean students enrolled at a small state university in Northern Chile; and 51 Russian students enrolled at a large state university in Moscow). Results indicate that: (a) Chilean students receiving instruction from Chilean professors perceive a significantly greater amount of instructor nonverbal immediacy than Russian students who receive instruction from Russian instructors; (b) Chilean students self-reporte significantly higher levels of Foreign Language Anxiety than their Russian counterparts; and (c) Foreign Language Anxiety is only slightly negatively correlated with one nonverbal teacher immediacy item in the Russian population and is not correlated with any items in the Chilean sample. Conclusions focus on the important role that culture plays in classroom language teaching and the implications for teacher training. Este análisis transcultural estudia los gestos de inmediatos en las clases de inglés en Chile y Rusia y su relación con la ansiedad en los idiomas extranjeros. Los participantes fueron 84 estudiantes universitarios de pregrado (33 chilenos matriculados en una peque a universidad estatal en el norte chileno y 51 estudiantes rusos matriculados en una universidad grande en Moscú). Los resultados indican que: a) los estudiantes chilenos que recibieron clases de profesores chilenos percibieron muchos más gestos inmediatos que los estudiantes rusos que recibieron clases de profesores rusos; b) los estudiantes chilenos revelan niveles muchos más altos de ansiedad en el aprendizaje de idiomas extranjeros que sus homólogos rusos; y c) la ansiedad muestra una leve correlación negativa con un ítem de los gestos del profesor en la población rusa y no está correlacionada con ningún ítem en los ejemplos chilenos. Las conclusiones se centran en la importancia del papel que tiene la cultura en las clases de idiomas extranjeros y las implicaciones para la formación docente.
The individual differences that distinguish high and low output students
Tammy Gregersen
Revista Signos , 2000,
Abstract:
Can Foreign Language Learning Strategies Turn Into Crutches?: A Pilot Study on the Use of Strategies by Successful and Unsuccessful Language Learners
Gregersen,Tammy; Vera Martínez,Ricardo; Pino Rojas,Pamela; Espinoza Alvarado,Leyla;
Revista signos , 2001, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-09342001004900007
Abstract: successful foreign language learners are characterized by knowing how to use language learning strategies effectively, including the ability to change them as their language proficiency increases. this pilot study asks the question as to whether language learning strategies that were used effectively at the beginning levels of language acquisition can convert into crutches at higher levels. to this end, six beginning students and six advanced students (three successful and three unsuccessful at each level) took the strategy inventory for language learning to measure their foreign language learning strategy use. by comparing the levels of proficiency and the variable of whether the participant was successful or unsuccessful, preliminary evidence was gathered that suggests that language learning strategies that were once effective at lower levels of proficiency can become stumbling blocks at higher levels.
Challenging the Precepts of Modernism: The Late Work of J.F. Willumsen
Gregersen, Anne
RIHA Journal , 2012,
Abstract: The late work of the Danish artist J.F. Willumsen (1863-1958) has until recently largely been marginalized and deemed kitsch, of poor quality and "odd". As opposed to the canonization of his earlier work, the period 1930-1958 has been difficult to "digest" and increasingly written off in Danish art history. This article takes a closer look at the late work, the reception of it by Willumsen's contemporaries and the artist's own claims about it. Furthermore, the article proposes to relate the status of the work to its resistance to notions that have become the precepts of modernism such as progression, irreversibility and defined "isms". The challenging of these notions is also found in the phenomenon of "Bad Painting" that has been presented and genealogized mainly through a number of exhibitions the last years. The article suggests to associate the work to this phenomenon.
Review of Survey activities 2007: The north-east Baffin Bay region, offshore Greenland – a new frontier petroleum exploration region
Gregersen, Ulrik
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletin , 2008,
Abstract:
Genre, technology and embodied interaction: The evolution of digital game genres and motion gaming
Andreas Gregersen
MedieKultur : Journal of Media and Communication Research , 2011,
Abstract: Technology has been given relatively little attention in genre theory, but this article argues that material technologies can be important components in genre development. The argument is based on a historically informed analysis of digital games, with special attention paid to home console video games and recent genre developments within this domain commonly referred to as motion gaming. The main point is that digital game genres imply structured embodied activity. A constitutive element of digital game mediation is a control interface geared to player embodiment, and I propose the concept of ‘interaction modes’ to describe the coupling of technology and player embodiment and show how this can be integrated with genre theory. The resulting framework allows for increased attention to continuity and change in game and communication genres, material and digital technologies, and the related interaction modes.
The evolutionary origins and significance of drug addiction
Tammy Saah
Harm Reduction Journal , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7517-2-8
Abstract: As we find ourselves in the beginning of a new millennium, we are faced with challenges to our survival as a human population. Some of the greatest threats to our survival are sweeping epidemics that affect millions of individuals worldwide. Drug addiction, although often regarded as a personality disorder, may also be seen as a worldwide epidemic with evolutionary genetic, physiological, and environmental influences controlling this behavior. Globally, the use of drugs has reached all-time highs. On average, drug popularity differs from nation to nation. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime identified major problem drugs on each continent by analyzing treatment demand [1]. From 1998 to 2002, Asia, Europe, and Australia showed major problems with opiate addiction, South America predominantly was affected by cocaine addiction, and Africans were treated most often for the addiction to cannabis. Only in North America was drug addiction distributed relatively evenly between the use of opiates, cannabis, cocaine, amphetamines, and other narcotics. However, all types of drugs are consumed throughout each continent. Interpol reported over 4000 tons of cannabis were seized in 1999, up 20% from 1998, with the largest seizures made in Southern Africa, the US, Mexico, and Western Europe [2]. Almost 150 tons of cocaine is purchased each year throughout Europe and in 1999 opium production reached an estimated 6600 tons, the dramatic increase most likely due to a burst of poppy crops throughout Southwest Asia. This rapid increase in drug use has had tremendous global effects, and the World Health Organization cited almost 200,000 drug-induced deaths alone in the year 2000 [3]. The Lewin group for the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism estimated the total economic cost of problematic use of alcohol and drugs in the United States to be $245.7 billion for the year 1992, of which $97.7 billion was due to drug abuse [4].
Immunopathogenesis of brain abscess
Tammy Kielian
Journal of Neuroinflammation , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1742-2094-1-16
Abstract: Brain abscesses develop in response to a parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria, beginning as a localized area of cerebritis and evolving into a suppurative lesion surrounded by a well-vascularized fibrotic capsule. The leading etiologic agents of brain abscess are the streptococcal strains and S. aureus, although a myriad of other organisms have also been reported [1,2]. Brain abscess represents a significant medical problem, accounting for one in every 10,000 hospital admissions in the United States, and remains a serious situation despite recent advances made in detection and therapy [2]. In addition, the emergence of multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria has become a confounding factor. Following infection, the potential sequelae of brain abscess include the replacement of the abscessed area with a fibrotic scar, loss of brain tissue by surgical excision, or abscess rupture and death. Indeed, if not detected early, an abscess has the potential to rupture into the ventricular space, a serious complication with an 80% mortality rate [1]. The most common sources of brain abscess are direct or indirect cranial infection arising from the paranasal sinuses, middle ear, and teeth. Other routes include seeding of the brain from distant sites of infection in the body (i.e. endocarditis) or penetrating trauma to the head. Following brain abscess resolution patients may experience long-term complications including seizures, loss of mental acuity, and focal neurological defects that are lesion site-dependent.At the histological level, brain abscess is typified by a sequential series of pathological changes that have been elucidated using the experimental rodent models described in detail below [3-7]. Staging of brain abscess in humans has been based on findings obtained during CT or MRI scans. The early stage or early cerebritis occurs from days 1–3 and is typified by neutrophil accumulation, tissue necrosis, and edema. Microglial and astrocyte activation is also e
Mythic Foundations: Engaging History for Architecture Education
Tammy Gaber
Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research , 2012,
Abstract:
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