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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 713 matches for " Surjushe Amar "
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Prevention of mother-to-child transmission
Surjushe Amar,Maniar Janak
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2008,
Abstract:
Mycophenolate mofetil
Surjushe Amar,Saple D
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2008,
Abstract:
Aloe vera: A short review
Surjushe Amar,Vasani Resham,Saple D
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2008,
Abstract: Aloe vera is a natural product that is now a day frequently used in the field of cosmetology. Though there are various indications for its use, controlled trials are needed to determine its real efficacy. The aloe vera plant, its properties, mechanism of action and clinical uses are briefly reviewed in this article.
Utility of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in diagnosis of various lung conditions: Our experience at rural medical college
Bhadke Batau,Munje Radha,Mahadani Jaywant,Surjushe Amar
Lung India , 2010,
Abstract: Aim: To evaluate the utility of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in order to find out the etiology in various lung conditions. Materials and Methods: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 120 adult patients who had persistent opacities on chest radiography in the form of collapse, consolidation, hilar mass and cavity with proper antibiotic course of 1 to 3 months. Bronchoscopic aspirates, brushing and biopsy (as and when required) were taken. Patient with known lung cancer, sputum positive pulmonary TB, recent myocardial infarction, allergic diseases and blood dyscrasias were excluded. Results: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was diagnostic in 90 (75%) patients. Bacterial pneumonias were found in 32 (26.66%), malignancy in 28(23.33%), pulmonary TB in 20 (16.66%), fungal pneumonia in 6(5%) and foreign bodies in 4(3.33%) patients. In 30(25%) patients no specific diagnosis was made. Conclusion: We conclude that fiberoptic bronchoscopy was found to be extremely useful in finding specific etiology of various lung diseases.
A clinical and mycological study of onychomycosis in HIV infection
Surjushe Amar,Kamath Ratnakar,Oberai Chetan,Saple Dattatray
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2007,
Abstract: Background: Onychomycosis is one of the early manifestations of HIV infection with a prevalence of 15-40%. Multiple nail involvement, isolation of both common and rare species, and resistance to treatment are the characteristics of onychomycosis in HIV. Aim: To study the epidemiology, clinical manifestations of onychomycosis in HIV-infected individuals and to identify the various causative fungi microbiologically. Methods: A total of 250 HIV infected patients, diagnosed by ELISA, were screened for nail involvement; of which 60 patients i.e., 40 males and 20 females, who had clinically suspected untreated fungal infection were included in this study. Results: Of the 60 respondents, 34 (56.66%) were from the 31-40 years age group. Amongst the 40 males, there were 20 manual laborers and 14 farmers; while 18 of 20 females were housewives. Toenail involvement was seen in 38 patients (63.33%), fingernail in 12 patients (20%) while 10 (16.66%) patients had involvement of both. Twenty eight (46.66%) patients gave history of some trauma, 6 (10%) had diabetes mellitus, and only 1 patient (1.66%) had history of peripheral vascular disease. Nineteen (31.66%) patients had associated tinea pedis, 5 (8.33%) had tinea manuum, 10 (16.66%) had tinea corporis and 7 (11.66%) had tinea cruris. Twenty one (35%) respondents had distal and lateral superficial onychomycosis (DLSO), 5 (8.33%) had proximal subungual onychomycosis (PSO), 1 (1.66%) had superficial white onychomycosis (SWO), while 33 (55%) had total dystrophic onychomycosis (TDO). Fungal elements were demonstrated by KOH mount in 49 patients (81.66%) and growth was seen in 32 (53.33%) cultures. Dermatophytes were isolated in 13 (21.66%) and nondermatophytic molds (NDM) in 19 (31.66%). Out of the 13 positive dermatophyte cultures, Trichophyton rubrum was isolated on 11 and Trichophyton mentagrophytes on 2 cultures. Of the 19 non-dermatophytic cultures, Aspergillus niger was isolated on 3 and Candida spp. on 12 while Cladosporium spp., Scytalidium hyalinum, Penicillium spp., and Gymnoascus dankaliensis on 1 each. Conclusions: Total dystrophic onychomycosis was the most common clinical type and NDM were the predominant causative organisms.
Necrotizing fasciitis in an HIV-infected patient
Surjushe Amar,Vasani Resham,Thakre Minal,Saple D
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2008,
Abstract:
Darier′s sign
Surjushe Amar,Jindal Saurabh,Gote Prashant,Saple D
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2007,
Abstract:
Anderson-Fabry′s disease with marfanoid features
Surjushe Amar,Jindal Saurabh,Sao Prajct,Medhekar Sudhir
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2008,
Abstract:
Hand-foot syndrome due to capecitabine
Surjushe Amar,Vasani Resham,Medhekar Sudhir,Thakre Minal
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2009,
Abstract:
Hand-foot syndrome due to capecitabine
Surjushe Amar,Vasani Resham,Medhekar Sudhir,Thakre Minal
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2008,
Abstract:
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