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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 33560 matches for " Sofie Van Kelst "
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Autophagy Inhibitor Chloroquine Enhanced the Cell Death Inducing Effect of the Flavonoid Luteolin in Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells
Lien Verschooten, Kathleen Barrette, Sofie Van Kelst, Noemí Rubio Romero, Charlotte Proby, Rita De Vos, Patrizia Agostinis, Marjan Garmyn
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0048264
Abstract: Background Flavonoids are widely proposed as very interesting compounds with possible chemopreventive and therapeutic capacities. Methods & Results In this study, we showed that in vitro treatment with the flavonoid Luteolin induced caspase-dependent cell death in a model of human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) derived cells, representing a matched pair of primary tumor and its metastasis. Notably, no cytotoxic effects were observed in normal human keratinocytes when treated with similar doses of Luteolin. Luteolin-induced apoptosis was accompanied by inhibition of AKT signaling, and sensitivity decreased with tumor progression, as the primary MET1 SCC cells were considerably more sensitive to Luteolin than the isogenic metastatic MET4 cells. Extensive intracellular vacuolization was observed in Luteolin-treated MET4 cells, which were characterized as acidic lysosomal vacuoles, suggesting the involvement of autophagy. Transmission electron microscopy, mRFP-GFP-LC3 assay and p62 protein degradation, confirmed that Luteolin stimulated the autophagic process in the metastatic MET4 cells. Blocking autophagy using chloroquine magnified Luteolin-induced apoptosis in the metastatic SCC cells. Conclusion Together, these results suggest that Luteolin has the capacity to induce selectively apoptotic cell death both in primary cutaneous SCC cells and in metastatic SCC cells in combination with chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagosomal degradation. Hence, Luteolin might be a promising agent for the treatment of cutaneous SCC.
Atonal homolog 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene
Wouter Bossuyt,Avedis Kazanjian,Natalie De Geest,Sofie Van Kelst,Gert De Hertogh,Karel Geboes,Greg P. Boivin,Judith Luciani,Francois Fuks,Marinee Chuah,Thierry VandenDriessche,Peter Marynen,Jan Cools,Noah F. Shroyer,Bassem A. Hassan
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000039
Abstract: Colon cancer accounts for more than 10% of all cancer deaths annually. Our genetic evidence from Drosophila and previous in vitro studies of mammalian Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also called Math1 or Hath1) suggest an anti-oncogenic function for the Atonal group of proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. We asked whether mouse Atoh1 and human ATOH1 act as tumor suppressor genes in vivo. Genetic knockouts in mouse and molecular analyses in the mouse and in human cancer cell lines support a tumor suppressor function for ATOH1. ATOH1 antagonizes tumor formation and growth by regulating proliferation and apoptosis, likely via activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, colorectal cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma patients show genetic and epigenetic ATOH1 loss-of-function mutations. Our data indicate that ATOH1 may be an early target for oncogenic mutations in tissues where it instructs cellular differentiation.
Atonal homolog 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene
Wouter Bossuyt equal contributor,Avedis Kazanjian equal contributor,Natalie De Geest,Sofie Van Kelst,Gert De Hertogh,Karel Geboes,Greg P Boivin,Judith Luciani,Francois Fuks,Marinee Chuah,Thierry VandenDriessche,Peter Marynen,Jan Cools,Noah F Shroyer ,Bassem A Hassan
PLOS Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000039
Abstract: Colon cancer accounts for more than 10% of all cancer deaths annually. Our genetic evidence from Drosophila and previous in vitro studies of mammalian Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also called Math1 or Hath1) suggest an anti-oncogenic function for the Atonal group of proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. We asked whether mouse Atoh1 and human ATOH1 act as tumor suppressor genes in vivo. Genetic knockouts in mouse and molecular analyses in the mouse and in human cancer cell lines support a tumor suppressor function for ATOH1. ATOH1 antagonizes tumor formation and growth by regulating proliferation and apoptosis, likely via activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, colorectal cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma patients show genetic and epigenetic ATOH1 loss-of-function mutations. Our data indicate that ATOH1 may be an early target for oncogenic mutations in tissues where it instructs cellular differentiation.
Population Genetic Differences along a Latitudinal Cline between Original and Recently Colonized Habitat in a Butterfly
Sofie Vandewoestijne,Hans Van Dyck
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013810
Abstract: Past and current range or spatial expansions have important consequences on population genetic structure. Habitat-use expansion, i.e. changing habitat associations, may also influence genetic population parameters, but has been less studied. Here we examined the genetic population structure of a Palaeartic woodland butterfly Pararge aegeria (Nymphalidae) which has recently colonized agricultural landscapes in NW-Europe. Butterflies from woodland and agricultural landscapes differ in several phenotypic traits (including morphology, behavior and life history). We investigated whether phenotypic divergence is accompanied by genetic divergence between populations of different landscapes along a 700 km latitudinal gradient.
Editorial
Sofie Dreef,Marcel van Looij
Amsterdam Law Forum , 2010,
Abstract:
The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Sofie Van Rossom,Erwin Swinnen,Joris Winderickx
Frontiers in Oncology , 2012, DOI: 10.3389/fonc.2012.00077
Abstract: DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.
The Tonsils Revisited: Review of the Anatomical Localization and Histological Characteristics of the Tonsils of Domestic and Laboratory Animals
Christophe Casteleyn,Sofie Breugelmans,Paul Simoens,Wim Van den Broeck
Clinical and Developmental Immunology , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/472460
Abstract: This paper gives an overview of the anatomical localization and histological characteristics of the tonsils that are present in ten conventional domestic animal species, including the sheep, goat, ox, pig, horse, dog, cat, rabbit, rat, and pigeon. Anatomical macrographs and histological images of the tonsils are shown. Six tonsils can be present in domestic animals, that is, the lingual, palatine, paraepiglottic, pharyngeal, and tubal tonsils and the tonsil of the soft palate. Only in the sheep and goat, all six tonsils are present. Proper tonsils are absent in the rat, and pigeon. In the rabbit, only the palatine tonsils can be noticed, whereas the pig does not present palatine tonsils. The paraepiglottic tonsils lack in the ox, horse, and dog. In addition, the dog and cat are devoid of the tubal tonsil and the tonsil of the soft palate.
Queer theory and change: Towards a pragmatic approach to resistance and subversion in media research on gay and lesbian identities
De Ridder,Sander; Dhaenens,Frederik; Van Bauwel,Sofie;
Observatorio (OBS*) , 2011,
Abstract: this paper wants to challenge the tendency in media studies on gay and lesbian identities to remain within two dominant paradigms: the essentialist or the post-structuralist traditions. consequently, we will elaborate on the question: if media research emphasizes social change, should it mainly adopt a political and strategic identity claim which refers to essentialism, or, should it acknowledge discourses as more important, and therefore use post-structural and queer theoretical insights? since we discuss the case of gay and lesbian identities, we will focus on possible resistance in popular culture, which mainly involves offering alternatives to the continuous representation of heteronormativity. we will argue that for social change to occur, there needs to be a symbiosis between agency and structure. to this end, a dialectic approach is needed that bridges the gaps between, on the one hand, a post-structuralist project that creates awareness of norms, discourse and hegemony, and on the other, identity politics that have the potential to change laws and institutions. this paper will offer a mainly theoretical exploration and will use illustrations from popular media culture with a focus on television. to this end, this paper will illustrate how lgbt-targeted television channels employ the discussed strategies of resistance.
Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: A Systematic Review of Interventions
An-Sofie Van Parys, Annelien Verhamme, Marleen Temmerman, Hans Verstraelen
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085084
Abstract: Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) around the time of pregnancy is a widespread global health problem with many negative consequences. Nevertheless, a lot remains unclear about which interventions are effective and might be adopted in the perinatal care context. Objective The objective is to provide a clear overview of the existing evidence on effectiveness of interventions for IPV around the time of pregnancy. Methods Following databases PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched and expanded by hand search. The search was limited to English peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials published from 2000 to 2013. This review includes all types of interventions aiming to reduce IPV around the time of pregnancy as a primary outcome, and as secondary outcomes to enhance physical and/or mental health, quality of life, safety behavior, help seeking behavior, and/or social support. Results We found few randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for IPV around the time of pregnancy. Moreover, the nine studies identified did not produce strong evidence that certain interventions are effective. Nonetheless, home visitation programs and some multifaceted counseling interventions did produce promising results. Five studies reported a statistically significant decrease in physical, sexual and/or psychological partner violence (odds ratios from 0.47 to 0.92). Limited evidence was found for improved mental health, less postnatal depression, improved quality of life, fewer subsequent miscarriages, and less low birth weight/prematurity. None of the studies reported any evidence of a negative or harmful effect of the interventions. Conclusions and implications Strong evidence of effective interventions for IPV during the perinatal period is lacking, but some interventions show promising results. Additional large-scale, high-quality research is essential to provide further evidence about the effect of certain interventions and clarify which interventions should be adopted in the perinatal care context.
Passive Acoustic Tracking of Singing Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) on a Northwest Atlantic Feeding Ground
Joy E. Stanistreet, Denise Risch, Sofie M. Van Parijs
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0061263
Abstract: Passive acoustic tracking provides an unobtrusive method of studying the movement of sound-producing animals in the marine environment where traditional tracking methods may be costly or infeasible. We used passive acoustic tracking to characterize the fine-scale movements of singing humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) on a northwest Atlantic feeding ground. Male humpback whales produce complex songs, a phenomenon that is well documented in tropical regions during the winter breeding season, but also occurs at higher latitudes during other times of year. Acoustic recordings were made throughout 2009 using an array of autonomous recording units deployed in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Song was recorded during spring and fall, and individual singing whales were localized and tracked throughout the array using a correlation sum estimation method on the time-synchronized recordings. Tracks were constructed for forty-three song sessions, revealing a high level of variation in movement patterns in both the spring and fall seasons, ranging from slow meandering to faster directional movement. Tracks were 30 min to 8 h in duration, and singers traveled distances ranging from 0.9 to 20.1 km. Mean swimming speed was 2.06 km/h (SD 0.95). Patterns and rates of movement indicated that most singers were actively swimming. In one case, two singers were tracked simultaneously, revealing a potential acoustic interaction. Our results provide a first description of the movements of singers on a northwest Atlantic feeding ground, and demonstrate the utility of passive acoustic tracking for studying the fine-scale movements of cetaceans within the behavioral context of their calls. These methods have further applications for conservation and management purposes, particularly by enhancing our ability to estimate cetacean densities using passive acoustic monitoring.
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