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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 14069 matches for " Singh NR "
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Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip During Pregnancy
Singh NR,Singh WJ,Wangjam K
Indian Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation , 2010,
Abstract: Transient Osteoporosis is a well organised form ofregional osteoporosis, though rare. It affects the activitiesof daily living by its extended course of the disease anddisproportionate pain of the affected joint, even though itresolves spontaneously with a benign course. If notrecognised, the presentation can be alarming both clinicallyand radiologically1. Curtis and Kincaid2 introduced theterm “transient demineralisation of the hip” referring to arapidly developing, painful local osteoporosis of limitednature but of unexplained patho-physiology. Later on,Lequesne3 coined the term, transient osteoporosis of thehip in 1968.Transient osteoporosis can occur at any age, and in eithersex, but most commonly occurs in women during the thirdtrimester of pregnancy and in middle-aged men1. Hip isthe most commonly affected joint, though migratorypattern may affect the contra-lateral hip joint or the ankleand foot joints. Higher incidence of transient osteoporosishas been reported in patients with osteogenesis imperfect.Here, we report a case of transient osteoporosis affectingthe hip joint during the third trimester of pregnancy.
Low markers of muscle damage and inflammation following a 3-day trail run
EC Denissen, AH de Waard, NR Singh, EM Peters
South African Journal of Sports Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Objectives. To investigate the effect of a 3-day trail run on markers of muscle damage and inflammation in recreational runners. Main outcome measures. Pre-and post-stage and 24-hour and 72- hour post-race concentrations of serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), high sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hsCRP), cortisol, cardiac Troponin T (cTnT), and osmolality (sOsm) as well as urinary myoglobin (uMb), changes in body mass, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and thigh circumference (TC) were measured. Continuous recordings of heart rate (HR) and intestinal temperature (Tintest ) were made throughout each stage. Results. Heart rate ranged between 77% and 83% age-predicted maximum (APmax) and Tintest between 36.1 and 40.2oC during the three stages. Significant rises in mean serum CPK, hsCRP, sOsm and blood neutrophil count reached peak concentrations of 1488U/l, 8.91mg/l, 298mosm/l and 10.21 109/l (p<0.001), respectively. No evidence of elevations in uMb and cTnT were detected. The stage-induced increments in DOMS correlated positively with CPK, r=0.71; 95% CI [0.62, 0.78], TC decreased significantly post S1post and S2post (p<0.05) and a maximum mean body mass loss of 3.09% (±1.04%) occurred during S2. Conclusion. Three consecutive days of 95-km trail running resulted in low markers of muscle damage and inflammation, despite the maintenance of a heart rate above 77% APmax, Tintest rising above 39oC and mean body mass decrement of >2.0%.
Cellular interaction of folic acid conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and its use as contrast agent for targeted magnetic imaging of tumor cells
Kumar M, Singh G, Arora V, Mewar S, Sharma U, Jagannathan NR, Sapra S, Dinda AK, Kharbanda S, Singh H
International Journal of Nanomedicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S32694
Abstract: lar interaction of folic acid conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and its use as contrast agent for targeted magnetic imaging of tumor cells Original Research (3167) Total Article Views Authors: Kumar M, Singh G, Arora V, Mewar S, Sharma U, Jagannathan NR, Sapra S, Dinda AK, Kharbanda S, Singh H Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 3503 - 3516 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S32694 Received: 06 April 2012 Accepted: 03 May 2012 Published: 06 July 2012 Manoj Kumar,1 Gurpal Singh,1 Vikas Arora,2 Sujeet Mewar,3 Uma Sharma,3 NR Jagannathan,3 Sameer Sapra,2 Amit K Dinda,4 Surender Kharbanda,5 Harpal Singh1 1Center for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016, India; 2Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016, India; 3Department Of NMR, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar New Delhi-110029, India; 4Department Of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar New Delhi-110029, India; 5Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA Abstract: The purpose of the study was to develop tumor specific, water dispersible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and evaluate their efficacy as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have developed SPIONs capped with citric acid/2-bromo-2-methylpropionic acid which are compact, water dispersible, biocompatible having narrow range of size dispersity (8–10 nm), and relatively high T2 relaxivity (R2 = 222L · mmol-1 · sec-l). The targeting efficacy of unconjugated and folic acid-conjugated SPIONs (FA-SPIONS) was evaluated in a folic acid receptor overexpressing and negative tumor cell lines. Folic acid receptor-positive cells incubated with FA-SPIONs showed much higher intracellular iron content without any cytotoxicity. Ultrastructurally, SPIONs were seen as clustered inside the various stages of endocytic pathways without damaging cellular organelles and possible mechanism for their entry is via receptor mediated endocytosis. In vitro MRI studies on tumor cells showed better T2-weighted images in FA-SPIONs. These findings indicate that FA-SPIONs possess high colloidal stability with excellent sensitivity of imaging and can be a useful MRI contrast agent for the detection of cancer.
Schistosomiasis vaccine development: progress and prospects
Bergquist, NR;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02761998000700013
Abstract: the undisputed, worldwide success of chemotherapy notwithstanding, schistosomiasis continues to defy control efforts in as much rapid reinfection demands repeated treatment, sometimes as often as once a year. there is thus a need for a complementary tool with effect for the longer term, notably a vaccine. international efforts in this direction have been ongoing for several decades but, until the recombinant dna techniques were introduced, antigen production remained an unsurmountable bottleneck. although animal experiments have been highly productive and are still much needed, they probably do not reflect the human situation adequately and real progress can not be expected until more is known about human immune responses to schistosome infection. it is well-known that irradiated cercariae consistently produce high levels of protection in experimental animals but, for various reasons, this proof of principle cannot be directly exploited. research has instead been focussed on the identification and testing of specific schistosome antigens. this work has been quite successful and is already at the stage where clinical trials are called for. preliminary results from coordinated in vitro laboratory and field epidemiological studies regarding the protective potential of several antigens support the initiation of such trials. a series of meetings, organized earlier this year in cairo, egypt, reviewed recent progress, selecteded suitable vaccine candidates and made firm recommendations for future action including pledging support for large-scale production according to good manufacturing practice (gmp) and phase i trials. scientists at the american centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) have drawn up a detailed research plan. the major financial support will come from usaid, cairo, which has established a scientific advisory group of egyptian scientists and representatives from current and previous international donors such as who, niaid, the european union and t
Debunking three myths about Madagascar’s deforestation
NR Horning
Madagascar Conservation & Development , 2012,
Abstract: After more than three decades of describing, explaining, and tackling deforestation in Madagascar, the problem persists. Why do researchers, practitioners, politicians, and farmers remain perplexed about this problem? This essay offers that our collective thinking of the past three decades has inadvertently perpetuated three myths. The first is that farmers are central agents of deforestation. The second is that the Malagasy state has the capacity and willingness to address the problem. And the third is that Madagascar is unique, especially relative to the rest of Africa. This essay examines each of these established ‘truths’ in an effort to overcome deforestation and all the degradation – environmental, social, and economic – that accompanies it. It argues that the assumptions behind conservation policies and projects are perpetuated by a class of powerful domestic and foreign individuals whose interests are best served by not questioning their validity. It concludes that fighting deforestation from now on must entail a deliberate, collective effort to question these assumptions and a willingness to open up the thinking to farmers and fellow Africans.
The provision of recreation services for the aged in the Durban Metropolitan Area (DMA)
NR Ngcobo
Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences , 2010,
Abstract: This paper investigated the provision of recreation services for the aged in the Durban Metropolitan Area (DMA). The main argument in the research is that the aged like any other age groups need to be provided with recreation services. The objectives underpinning this investigation include the following: To reveal the adequacy of existing recreation services which are provided for the aged in the Durban Metropolitan Area. To determine the views that the aged population holds towards recreation participation by the aged. To establish the extent to which the aged in the Durban Metropolitan Area value their recreation participation. To establish the level of concessions granted to the aged by the recreation service providers in the Durban Metropolitan Area on utilising recreation facilities. A survey research method, comprising a self-completed questionnaire and a structured interview schedule, was used to gather data from the respondents who comprised 260 aged (main sample), 120 general members of the public and 10 recreation service providers in the DMA. This was further supplemented by the observation method. Having analysed the data, the chi-square test was used to test the validity and reliability of the hypotheses. The most salient findings indicate that the aged in the DMA are not adequately provided with recreation services, despite the fact that they attach certain positive values to recreation participation. The research further highlighted that the DMA needs to provide recreation programmes that the aged can afford. Non-prescriptive recommendations revolve inter alia around: conducting a needs analysis survey prior to the provision of recreation services for the aged. The location of recreation facilities to be used by the aged must be in an area that is easily accessible. Furthermore, the aged must be granted special concessions in the utilisation of recreation facilities.
NQO1*2 [NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1] polymorphism and its influence on acute leukemia risk
NR. Dunna
Biology and Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: NAD (P) H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is an enzyme that protects cells against mutagenicity from freeradicals and toxic oxygen metabolites. The gene coding for NQO1 has polymorphism at nucleotide position 609(C-T)of the human cDNA. Heterozygous individuals (C/T) have intermediate activity and homozygotes for the variant allele(T/T) are deficient in NQO1 activity. In previous studies, genotypes conferring lower NQO1 activity have beenassociated with an increased risk of acute leukemia. The present study includes 297 acute leukemia casescomprising of 151 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), 146 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 220 control samples foranalysis of NQO1*2 polymorphism using PCR-RFLP method. The NQO1*2 polymorphism was significantlyassociated with acute leukemia development (χ2- 31.614; df-2, p - < 0.000) with respect to clinical variables. MeanWBC, Blast %, LDH levels were increased in both ALL and AML cases with TT genotype. 50% of AML cases failed toachieve complete remission towards therapy. There was significant reduction in mean DFS (Disease Free Survival) inboth ALL and AML cases with TT genotype (21.18m, 8.31m). Our results suggest that TT genotype might beconsidered as a risk genotype for development of acute leukemia and is associated with poor prognostic markers.
Ohtahara syndrome and IVF: A case report
Ashrafi NR
Acta Medica Iranica , 2000,
Abstract: Ohtahara syndrome or ealy infantile epileptic encephalopathy is a rare cause of epileptic seizures during infancy and represents the earliest type of age related symptomatic generalized epilepsies. The main etiologic factor associated with ohtahara syndrome is cerebran dysgenesis. This case was the product of in vitro fertilization (IVF) after 18 years of infertility . Neuroimaging findings consisted of diffuse white matter abnormalities, cortical atrophy and hemimegalencephaly. There is a previous report of this syndrome from Canada that was conceived throught IVF. A relation between IVF and the occurrence of Ohtahara synforme needs further observations.
Schistosomiasis vaccine development: progress and prospects
Bergquist NR
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1998,
Abstract: The undisputed, worldwide success of chemotherapy notwithstanding, schistosomiasis continues to defy control efforts in as much rapid reinfection demands repeated treatment, sometimes as often as once a year. There is thus a need for a complementary tool with effect for the longer term, notably a vaccine. International efforts in this direction have been ongoing for several decades but, until the recombinant DNA techniques were introduced, antigen production remained an unsurmountable bottleneck. Although animal experiments have been highly productive and are still much needed, they probably do not reflect the human situation adequately and real progress can not be expected until more is known about human immune responses to schistosome infection. It is well-known that irradiated cercariae consistently produce high levels of protection in experimental animals but, for various reasons, this proof of principle cannot be directly exploited. Research has instead been focussed on the identification and testing of specific schistosome antigens. This work has been quite successful and is already at the stage where clinical trials are called for. Preliminary results from coordinated in vitro laboratory and field epidemiological studies regarding the protective potential of several antigens support the initiation of such trials. A series of meetings, organized earlier this year in Cairo, Egypt, reviewed recent progress, selecteded suitable vaccine candidates and made firm recommendations for future action including pledging support for large-scale production according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) and Phase I trials. Scientists at the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have drawn up a detailed research plan. The major financial support will come from USAID, Cairo, which has established a scientific advisory group of Egyptian scientists and representatives from current and previous international donors such as WHO, NIAID, the European Union and the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation.
Increasing long-term response to selection
NR Wray, ME Goddard
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1994, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-26-5-431
Abstract:
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