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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 12097 matches for " Simon Cooper "
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A screen for proteins that interact with PAX6: C-terminal mutations disrupt interaction with HOMER3, DNCL1 and TRIM11
Simon T Cooper, Isabel M Hanson
BMC Genetics , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2156-6-43
Abstract: We used bioinformatics techniques to characterise a highly conserved peptide at the C-terminus of the PAX6 protein. Yeast two-hybrid library screens were then carried out to identify brain-expressed proteins that interact with the C-terminal peptide and with the entire PAX6 proline-serine-threonine-rich domain. Three novel PAX6-interacting proteins were identified: the post-synaptic density (PSD) protein HOMER3, the dynein subunit DNCL1, and the tripartite motif protein TRIM11. Three C-terminal PAX6 mutations, previously identified in patients with eye malformations, all reduced or abolished the interactions.Our preliminary data suggest that PAX6 interacts with HOMER3, DNCL1 and TRIM11. We propose that the interaction of PAX6 with HOMER3 and DNCL1 is a mechanism by which synaptic activation could lead to changes in neuronal transcriptional activity, and that some of the neural anomalies in patients with PAX6 mutations could be explained by impaired protein-protein interactions.The PAX6 protein is a member of the PAX (paired-box) family of transcriptional regulators and is essential for normal ocular and neural development [1]. Heterozygous mutations of the human PAX6 gene cause aniridia (absence of the iris) and a range of other congenital eye malformations [2]. Neural defects such as foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve hypoplasia are common in PAX6-associated eye disease [3-5]. Homozygous mutations in man and mouse are lethal and result in severe developmental abnormalities including anophthalmia, severe reduction of the olfactory structures and gross brain malformations [2,6]. The roles of PAX6 in brain development have mainly been studied in homozygous mutant mice or rats and include arealisation of the cerebral cortex [7], formation of the prosencephalon-mesencephalon boundary [8], axon guidance [8], differentiation of neurons from glia [9] and neuronal migration in the cerebellum [10].The discovery of multiple and diverse roles for PAX6 in brain development promp
Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures
Simon Cooper, Ruth Endacott, Robyn Cant
Open Access Emergency Medicine , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S6693
Abstract: suring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures Review (6165) Total Article Views Authors: Simon Cooper, Ruth Endacott, Robyn Cant Published Date January 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 7 - 16 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S6693 Simon Cooper1, Ruth Endacott2, Robyn Cant1 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth UK Aim: To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care. Background: Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures. Methods: Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance. Results: A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills. Conclusion: A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care.
Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures
Simon Cooper,Ruth Endacott,Robyn Cant
Open Access Emergency Medicine , 2010,
Abstract: Simon Cooper1, Ruth Endacott2, Robyn Cant11School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth UKAim: To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care.Background: Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures.Methods: Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance.Results: A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills.Conclusion: A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care.Keywords: non-technical skills, teamwork, medical emergency, standards
The Value of Peer Learning in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Systematic Review
Robyn Stone,Simon Cooper,Robyn Cant
ISRN Nursing , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/930901
Abstract:
The Value of Peer Learning in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Systematic Review
Robyn Stone,Simon Cooper,Robyn Cant
ISRN Nursing , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/930901
Abstract: The study examined various methods of peer learning and their effectiveness in undergraduate nursing education. Using a specifically developed search strategy, healthcare databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles, with studies involving peer learning and students in undergraduate general nursing courses (in both clinical and theoretical settings) being included. The studies were published in English between 2001 and 2010. Both study selection and quality analysis were undertaken independently by two researchers using published guidelines and data was thematically analyzed to answer the research questions. Eighteen studies comprising various research methods were included. The variety of terms used for peer learning and variations between study designs and assessment measures affected the reliability of the study. The outcome measures showing improvement in either an objective effect or subjective assessment were considered a positive result with sixteen studies demonstrating positive aspects to peer learning including increased confidence, competence, and a decrease in anxiety. We conclude that peer learning is a rapidly developing aspect of nursing education which has been shown to develop students’ skills in communication, critical thinking, and self-confidence. Peer learning was shown to be as effective as the conventional classroom lecture method in teaching undergraduate nursing students. 1. Introduction Nursing education studies have often focused on traditional teaching methods such as classroom lecture learning, a behaviourism-based teaching method based on passive learning [1]. More effective student-centric learning methods are now being utilized to encourage active student participation and creative thinking [2–4]. One of these methods is peer learning, in which peers learn from one another, involving active student participation and where the student takes responsibility for their learning. Despite being used for many years, one of the barriers to advancement of peer learning is a lack of consistency in its definition [5]. It is known by different interchangeable titles such as “cooperative learning,” “mentoring,” “peer review learning,” “peer coaching,” “peer mentoring,” “problem-based learning,” and “team learning.” Peer learning has been used in education to address critical thinking, psychomotor skills, cognitive development, clinical skills, and academic gains [6–9]. One type of peer learning is problem-based learning (PBL) which is characterized by students learning from each other and from independently sourced
Derivative relation for thermopower in the quantum Hall regime
Steven H. Simon,Nigel R. Cooper
Physics , 1997, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.R7116
Abstract: Recently, Tieke et al (to be published in PRL) have observed the relation S_{yx} = alpha B dS_{xx}/dB for the components of the thermopower tensor in the quantum Hall regime, where alpha is a constant and B is the magnetic field. Simon and Halperin (PRL 73, 3278 (1994)) have suggested that an analogous relation observed for the resistivity tensor R_{xx} = \alpha B dR_{xy}/dB can be explained with a model of classical transport in an inhomogeneous medium where the local Hall resistivity is a function of position and the local dissipative resistivity is a small constant. In the present paper, we show that this new thermopower relation can be explained with a similar model.
Ferromagnetic--nematic order and strongly correlated phases of fermions in optical flux lattices
Simon C. Davenport,Nigel R. Cooper
Physics , 2015, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.023608
Abstract: We study a model of a 2D ultracold atomic gas subject to an "optical flux lattice": a laser configuration where Raman-dressed atoms experience a strong artificial magnetic field. This leads to a bandstructure of narrow energy bands with non-zero Chern numbers. We consider the case of two-level (spin-$1/2$) fermionic atoms in this lattice, interacting via a repulsive $s$-wave contact interaction. Atoms restricted to the lowest band are described by an effective model of spinless fermions with interactions that couple states in a momentum-dependent manner across the Brillouin zone; a consequence of the Raman dressing of the two spin states. We present the results of detailed exact diagonalization studies of the many-body states for a range of filling factors, $\nu$. First, we present evidence for the existence of a phase with coupled ferromagnetic--nematic ordering, which was previously suggested by a mean-field analysis. Second, we present evidence indicating the presence of a Laughlin-like fractional quantum Hall state occurring at filling factor $\nu = 1/3$. Finally, we observe a charge density wave state at $\nu=1/2$, which we are able to cleanly distinguish from the Laughlin-like state by its translational symmetry breaking and relatively small participation ratio.
Signatures of Fractional Exclusion Statistics in the Spectroscopy of Quantum Hall Droplets
Nigel R. Cooper,Steven H. Simon
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.106802
Abstract: We show how spectroscopic experiments on a small Laughlin droplet of rotating bosons can directly demonstrate Haldane fractional exclusion statistics of quasihole excitations. The characteristic signatures appear in the single-particle excitation spectrum. We show that the transitions are governed by a "many-body selection rule" which allows one to relate the number of allowed transitions to the number of quasihole states on a finite geometry. We illustrate the theory with numerically exact simulations of small numbers of particles.
Managing patient deterioration: a protocol for enhancing undergraduate nursing students’ competence through web-based simulation and feedback techniques
Cooper Simon,Beauchamp Alison,Bogossian Fiona,Bucknall Tracey
BMC Nursing , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-11-18
Abstract: Aims To describe a funded proposal for the development of an on-line evidence based educational program for the management of deteriorating patients. Background There are international concerns regarding the management of deteriorating patients with issues around the ‘failure to rescue’. The primary response to these issues has been the development of medical emergency teams with little focus on the education of primary first responders. Design/Methods A mixed methods triangulated convergent design. In this four phase proposal we plan to 1. examine nursing student team ability to manage deteriorating patients and based upon these findings 2. develop web based educational material, including interactive scenarios. This educational material will be tested and refined in the third Phase 3, prior to evaluation and dissemination in the final phase. Conclusion This project aims to enhance knowledge development for the management of deteriorating patients through rigorous assessment of team performance and to produce a contemporary evidence-based online training program.
Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses
Mei Chan Chong,Karen Francis,Simon Cooper,Khatijah Lim Abdullah
Nursing Research and Practice , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/126748
Abstract: Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses’ (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. 1. Introduction Globally, all professionals have recognized the phenomenon of continuing professional education (CPE) as a primary method to enhance basic professional education regularly [1]. Globalization, technological advances, consumerism and climate changes have challenged the health care environment to ensure practice and services are contemporary. As nurses are the largest group of health care professionals globally, therefore nurses are required to participate in CPE to develop skills and competencies, and remain current in their practice. The International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics for Nurses [2] advocated that “the nurses carry personal responsibility and accountability for nursing practice, and for maintaining competence by continual learning.” In view of the important role of CPE to nurses, many countries have implemented mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE), beginning with the State of California in 1971 [3]. Later in 1973, the American Nurses Association advocated MCPE for relicensure [4]. Currently 23 states in the United States have enforced legislation that requires nurses to participate in CPE in order to renew their license to practice [5]. Similarly, in the United Kingdom, legislation was passed and MCPE was
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