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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3343 matches for " Shiekh FA "
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Personalized nanomedicine: future medicine for cancer treatment
Shiekh FA
International Journal of Nanomedicine , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S41525
Abstract: Personalized nanomedicine: future medicine for cancer treatment Editorial (3335) Total Article Views Authors: Shiekh FA Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:8 Pages 201 - 202 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S41525 Received: 12 December 2012 Accepted: 13 December 2012 Published: 09 January 2013 Farooq A Shiekh Avalon University School of Medicine, Willemstad, Curacao Cancer as a grave disease is becoming a larger health problem,1 and the medicines used as treatments have clear limitations.2–4 Chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, all of which are drastic treatments, wreak havoc on healthy cells and tissues as well as cancerous ones.5–7 Pathophysiologically, there are more than 200 types of cancers,8,9 each with many variants.10 Some are aggressive, some are not; some are easily treated, and others are always fatal.11 Unlike previous "revolutions" in the "war" on cancer that raised hope, nanomedicine is not just one more tool, it is an entire field, and the science in this area is burgeoning, and benefiting from use of modern cutting edge molecular tools.12–14 These breakthrough advancements have radically changed the perception of future medicine. Importantly, they are enabling landmark research to combine all advances, creating nanosized particles that contain drugs targeting cell surface receptors and other potent molecules designed to kill cancerous cells.15–19 If there is a case to be made for personalized medicine, cancer is it. For example, the current literature reveals the need for a great scientific effort to be made in this field.20–22 However, new paradigms are needed to interpret toxicogenomic and nanotoxicological data in order to predict drug toxicities and gain a more indepth understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity, so that more specific therapeutic targets which are essentially devoid of side effects could be selected.23,24 Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Farooq A. Shiekh Blood–brain barrier: a real obstacle for therapeutics Do calcifying nanoparticles really contain 16S rDNA? Readers of this article also read: Fungus-mediated biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles: potential in detection of liver cancer Molecular targeting of liposomal nanoparticles to tumor microenvironment Novel resveratrol nanodelivery systems based on lipid nanoparticles to enhance its oral bioavailability Oxidative stress contributes to cobalt oxide nanoparticles-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in human hepatocarcinoma cells Nanodiamonds as novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications: drug delivery and imaging systems Effects of a hybrid micro/nanorod topography-modified titanium implant on adhesion and osteogenic differentiation in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells Intracellular delivery of doxorubicin encapsulated in novel pH-responsive chitosan/heparin nanocapsules Design, physicochemical characterization, and optimization of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable
Blood–brain barrier: a real obstacle for therapeutics
Shiekh FA
International Journal of Nanomedicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S33837
Abstract: Blood–brain barrier: a real obstacle for therapeutics Letter (3021) Total Article Views Authors: Shiekh FA Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 4065 - 4067 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S33837 Received: 12 May 2012 Accepted: 17 May 2012 Published: 27 July 2012 Farooq A Shiekh Aix-Marseille Université, URMITE, UMR, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, Marseille, France In a recent report published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine, Gulati et al1 have described the most innovative study addressing an important issue of the "blood–brain barrier," which can act as a barrier to one of the fundamental goals of modern neurobiology that would have a direct impact on highly debated future therapeutics for both brain cancer and neurological disorders. Contrary to what has been the case with conventional therapy, the authors were able to completely bypass the blood–brain barrier (Figure 1) – a limiting factor for efficient drug delivery – by proposing a new, alternative approach using nanoengineered TNT/Ti implants for local delivery of chemotherapeutics such as doxorubicin into the brain. There must be millions of good drugs sitting in pharmaceutical company stores that cannot be delivered simply because they cannot get past the blood–brain barrier.2 This is an area that has been under-researched and its significance has not yet been recognized. Neuroscience textbooks bury this issue in the appendix, PhD programs give it a cursory treatment, and pharmaceutical companies have tried to ignore it. Despite the blood–brain barrier acting as a stubbornly real obstacle for potential drugs to be used against many disorders of the central nervous system, the field of drug delivery is advancing rapidly. View original paper by Gulati and colleagues. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Farooq A. Shiekh Do calcifying nanoparticles really contain 16S rDNA? Personalized nanomedicine: future medicine for cancer treatment Readers of this article also read: Performance in L1 and L2 observed in Arabic-Hebrew bilingual aphasic following brain tumor: A case constitutes double dissociation Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite Congenital malformations in Ecuadorian children: urgent need to create a National Registry of Birth Defects Epigenomics in cancer management Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation Radio electric asymmetric brain stimulation in the treatment of behavioral and psychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease Nanoengineered drug-releasing Ti wires as an alternative for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the brain Optical imaging to trace near infrared fluorescent zinc oxide nanopar
Do calcifying nanoparticles really contain 16S rDNA?
Shiekh FA
International Journal of Nanomedicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S35987
Abstract: Do calcifying nanoparticles really contain 16S rDNA? Letter (1892) Total Article Views Authors: Shiekh FA Published Date September 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 5051 - 5052 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S35987 Received: 15 July 2012 Accepted: 20 July 2012 Published: 18 September 2012 Farooq A Shiekh Aix-Marseille Université, URMITE, UMR, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, Marseille, France With great interest, I read a recent article published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine by Guo et al.1 This study involved an analysis of calcifying nanoparticles to determine the presence of unique 16S rDNA. Nanoparticles that have since been isolated from biological samples have properties that appear to be consistent with a novel life form, including "self-replication". However, despite a large body of intriguing and suggestive evidence, the true biological nature of nanoparticles has been elusive, and in the past decade this subject has spurred one of the biggest controversies in modern microbiology.2 First, the results published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Cisar et al reached a completely opposite conclusion to the original assertion by Kajander and Cift ioglu, which identified nanobacteria as living organisms.3,4 In addition, a closer look at the 16S rDNA sequences previously ascribed to so-called nanobacterial species showed that they are virtually identical to those of a notorious contaminating microorganism, Phyllobacterium mysinacearum. Second, after this report, multiple evidence-based studies were conducted in order to better understand the actual biological composition and self-propagation of nanobacteria.5–7 None of these findings are conclusive; however, biological insights of this mystery are now emerging. View original paper by Guo and colleagues. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Farooq A. Shiekh Blood–brain barrier: a real obstacle for therapeutics Personalized nanomedicine: future medicine for cancer treatment Readers of this article also read: Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology Performance in L1 and L2 observed in Arabic-Hebrew bilingual aphasic following brain tumor: A case constitutes double dissociation Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite The cognitive basis of diglossia in Arabic: Evidence from a repetition priming study within and between languages "Globalized public health.” A transdisciplinary comprehensive framework for analyzing contemporary globalization’s influences on the field of public health Epigenomics in cancer management Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation Optical imaging to trace near infrar
Personalized nanomedicine: future medicine for cancer treatment
Shiekh FA
International Journal of Nanomedicine , 2013,
Abstract: Farooq A ShiekhAvalon University School of Medicine, Willemstad, CuracaoCancer as a grave disease is becoming a larger health problem,1 and the medicines used as treatments have clear limitations.2–4 Chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, all of which are drastic treatments, wreak havoc on healthy cells and tissues as well as cancerous ones.5–7 Pathophysiologically, there are more than 200 types of cancers,8,9 each with many variants.10 Some are aggressive, some are not; some are easily treated, and others are always fatal.11Unlike previous "revolutions" in the "war" on cancer that raised hope, nanomedicine is not just one more tool, it is an entire field, and the science in this area is burgeoning, and benefiting from use of modern cutting edge molecular tools.12–14 These breakthrough advancements have radically changed the perception of future medicine. Importantly, they are enabling landmark research to combine all advances, creating nanosized particles that contain drugs targeting cell surface receptors and other potent molecules designed to kill cancerous cells.15–19 If there is a case to be made for personalized medicine, cancer is it. For example, the current literature reveals the need for a great scientific effort to be made in this field.20–22 However, new paradigms are needed to interpret toxicogenomic and nanotoxicological data in order to predict drug toxicities and gain a more indepth understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity, so that more specific therapeutic targets which are essentially devoid of side effects could be selected.23,24
Quantum Bit Error Avoidance  [PDF]
A. Y. Shiekh
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2018.611200
Abstract: Qubit errors might be avoided by using the quantum Zeno effect to inhibit evolution.
Auto-B?cklund Transformation and Extended Tanh-Function Methods to Solve the Time-Dependent Coefficients Calogero-Degasperis Equation  [PDF]
Rehab M. El-Shiekh
American Journal of Computational Mathematics (AJCM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ajcm.2015.52018
Abstract: In this paper, the Auto-B?cklund transformation connected with the homogeneous balance method (HB) and the extended tanh-function method are used to construct new exact solutions for the time-dependent coefficients Calogero-Degasperis (VCCD) equation. New soliton and periodic solutions of many types are obtained. Furthermore, the soliton propagation is discussed under the effect of the variable coefficients.
Approaching the event horizon of a black hole
A. Y. Shiekh
Advanced Studies in Theoretical Physics , 2012,
Abstract:
A Review of Leading Quantum Gravitational Corrections to Newtonian Gravity
Arif Akhundov,Anwar Shiekh
Electronic Journal of Theoretical Physics , 2008,
Abstract: In this review we present the theoretical background for treating General Relativity as an effective field theory and focus on the concrete results of such a treatment. As a result we present the calculations of the low-energy leading gravitational corrections to the Newtonian potential between two sources.
Can the Equivalence Principle Survive Quantization?
A. Y. Shiekh
Physics , 1996, DOI: 10.1023/A:1012693030982
Abstract: It is well known that Einstein gravity is non-renormalizable; however a generalized approach is proposed that leads to Einstein gravity {\it after} renormalization. This them implies that at least one candidate for quantum gravity treats all matter on an equal footing with regard to the gravitational behaviour.
Gravity Quantized (the high tension string)
S. Bellucci,A. Shiekh
Physics , 1997,
Abstract: A candidate theory of gravity quantized is reviewed.
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