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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 131594 matches for " Seth V "
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Adverse drug reactions to streptomycin-a reappraisal
Seth V,Seth S,Semwal O,D′monty V
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1990,
Abstract:
A Quantitative Assessment of the Morphology of the Piriform Aperture as an Indicator of Race  [PDF]
Seth Gardner
Forensic Medicine and Anatomy Research (FMAR) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/fmar.2015.31002
Abstract: Piriform apertures from skulls in the Bass Collection at the University of Tennessee were examined. The morphology of the perform aperture from digital images was captured using Adobe Measuring Tool 9.0 and data analyzed with SPSS 17.0. Twenty-four linear measurements from a central point of the aperture as well as the perimeter were evaluated to quantify a difference between Black and White populations. The statistical analyses employed Discriminate Functional Analysis followed by Stepwise analysis. Discriminate functions were generated to predict to which group a skull belonged. A discriminate function produced an accuracy of 77.4%. Step-wise discriminate function analysis, using only three variables, produced an accuracy of 79.0%.
Unusual Drainage of the Right Testicular Vein: A Case Report  [PDF]
Seth Gardner
Case Reports in Clinical Medicine (CRCM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/crcm.2015.46046
Abstract:
Routine dissection was carried out on a 75-year-old male cadaver and the drainage pattern of the testicular veins was identified and photographed. Dissection showed that the right testicular vein demonstrated an abnormal drainage pattern by terminating into the right renal vein. The left testicular vein demonstrated a normal drainage pattern by terminating into the left renal vein. The unusual drainage of the right testicular vein into the right renal vein may complicate hemodynamics thus causing a varicocele. Complications of a varicocele could lead to testis atrophy and/or infertility. Knowing the anatomical variants of the testicular veins drainage pattern may help the surgeon avoid potential complications during routine laparoscopic procedures and may also uncover a reason for male infertility.
Motion Vector Recovery Based Error Concealment for H.264 Video Communication: A Review
Seth Kavish,Kamakoti V,Srinivasan S
IETE Technical Review , 2011,
Abstract: Error concealment in video communication is becoming increasingly important because of the growing interest in video delivery over unreliable channels such as wireless networks and the Internet. A subclass of this error concealment in video communication is known as motion vector recovery (MVR). MVR techniques try to retrieve the lost motion information in the compressed video streams based on the available information in the locality (both spatial and temporal) of the lost data. The activities and practice in the area of MVR-based error concealment during the last two decades has been mainly elaborated here. A performance comparison of the prominent MVR techniques has also been presented.
Three-body rf association of Efimov trimers
T. V. Tscherbul,Seth T. Rittenhouse
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.062706
Abstract: We present a theoretical analysis of rf association of Efimov trimers in a 2-component Bose gas with short-range interactions. Using the adiabatic hyperspherical Green's function formalism to solve the quantum 3-body problem, we obtain universal expressions for 3-body rf association rates as a function of the s-wave scattering length $a$. We find that the association rates scale as $a^{-2}$ in the limit of large $a$, and diverge as $a^3 a_{ad}^{3}$ whenever an Efimov state crosses the atom-dimer threshold (where $a_{ad}$ stands for the atom-dimer scattering length). Our calculations show that trimer formation rates as large as $\sim10^{-21}$ cm$^6$/s can be achieved with rf Rabi frequencies of order 1 MHz, suggesting that direct rf association is a powerful tool of making and probing few-body quantum states in ultracold atomic gases.
Diagnostic problems in leucocoria
Ghose S,Seth V,Singhal V,Sood N
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1983,
Abstract:
Recording long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission by three-dimensional multi-electrode arrays
Maksym V Kopanitsa, Nurudeen O Afinowi, Seth GN Grant
BMC Neuroscience , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2202-7-61
Abstract: Using 3D MEAs, we were able to record larger fEPSPs compared to signals measured by planar MEAs. Several stimulation protocols were used to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic responses in the CA1 area recorded following excitation of Sch?ffer collateral/commissural fibres. Either two trains of high frequency tetanic stimulation or three trains of theta-burst stimulation caused a persistent, pathway specific enhancement of fEPSPs that remained significantly elevated for at least 60 min. A third LTP induction protocol that comprised 150 pulses delivered at 5 Hz, evoked moderate LTP if excitation strength was increased to 1.5× of the baseline stimulus. In all cases, we observed a clear spatial plasticity gradient with maximum LTP levels detected in proximal apical dendrites of pyramidal neurones. No significant differences in the manifestation of LTP were observed between 129S5/SvEvBrd and C57BL/6J-TyrC-Brd mice with the three protocols used. All forms of plasticity were sensitive to inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors.Principal features of LTP (magnitude, pathway specificity, NMDA receptor dependence) recorded in the hippocampal slices using MEAs were very similar to those seen in conventional glass electrode experiments. Advantages of using MEAs are the ability to record from different regions of the slice and the ease of conducting several experiments on a multiplexed platform which could be useful for efficient screening of novel transgenic mice.The dynamically changing strength of connections between neurones was proposed to be a mechanism for memory formation more than a century ago [1-3]. In 1949, Hebb provided a theoretical framework for this hypothesis [4] and in the 1960s this concept gained crucial experimental support when it was discovered that neurones can alter their firing properties upon experiencing particular patterns of external stimulation, i.e. they exhibit synaptic plasticity [5]. A classical example of synaptic plast
SELF-POTENTIAL SIGNALS CAUSED BY ERUPTIONS OF THE GALERAS VOLCANO - COLOMBIA
Greinwald,S.; Ortega,A.; Rugeles,A.; v. Seth,Ips, M.;
Earth Sciences Research Journal , 2007,
Abstract: the national institute of geology and mining, ingeominas - <> colombia , and the federal institute for geosciences and natural resources, bgr - <> germany , perform since 1997 as a joint venture multi-parameter measurements at the galeras volcano, in the southwest of <> colombia . since the end of 1998 the multi-parameter station at galeras (estación multiparámetro del galeras - emg) includes the continuous monitoring of electromagnetic variations. the electromagnetic (em) station is located at the north-norh-eastern foot walls of the central cone inside the caldera. during almost six years of electromagnetic monitoring, the data did not show significant variations of the electromagnetic field, which could be related to the volcanic activity. in july 2004 a new active period of galeras began with two strong ash emissions. during both emissions strong self potential-(sp) signals were recorded lasting for several hours. the present paper will present the data which could give some indications on the movements of liquids during ash emissions.
Knowledge of adverse drug reaction reporting in first year postgraduate doctors in a medical college
Upadhyaya P, Seth V, Moghe VV, Sharma M, Ahmed M
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S31482
Abstract: owledge of adverse drug reaction reporting in first year postgraduate doctors in a medical college Original Research (1440) Total Article Views Authors: Upadhyaya P, Seth V, Moghe VV, Sharma M, Ahmed M Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 307 - 312 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S31482 Received: 05 March 2012 Accepted: 17 April 2012 Published: 19 June 2012 Prerna Upadhyaya,1 Vikas Seth,2 Vijay V Moghe,1 Monika Sharma,1 Mushtaq Ahmed1 1Department of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Sitapura, Jaipur, Rajasthan, 2Department of Pharmacology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Safedabad, Barabanki, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India Introduction: Poor reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by doctors is a major hindrance to successful pharmacovigilance. The present study was designed to assess first-year residents’ knowledge of ADR reporting. Methods: First-year postgraduate doctors at a private medical college completed a structured questionnaire. The responses were analyzed by nonparametric methods. Results: All doctors were aware of the term “adverse drug reactions.” Fifty percent of the doctors reported being taught about ADR reporting during their undergraduate teaching, and 50% had witnessed ADRs in their internship training. Ten percent of patients suffering an ADR observed and reported by doctors required prolonged hospitalization for treatment as a result. Only 40% of interns reported the ADRs that they observed, while 60% did not report them. Twenty-eight percent reported ADRs to the head of the department, 8% to an ADR monitoring committee, and 4% to the pharmacovigilance center. Eighty-six percent of the doctors surveyed felt that a good knowledge of undergraduate clinical pharmacology therapeutics would have improved the level of ADR reporting. Conclusion: The knowledge of first-year doctors regarding ADR reporting is quite poor. There is a dire need to incorporate ADR reporting into undergraduate teaching, and to reinforce this during internships and periodically thereafter.
Knowledge of adverse drug reaction reporting in first year postgraduate doctors in a medical college
Upadhyaya P,Seth V,Moghe VV,Sharma M
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2012,
Abstract: Prerna Upadhyaya,1 Vikas Seth,2 Vijay V Moghe,1 Monika Sharma,1 Mushtaq Ahmed11Department of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Sitapura, Jaipur, Rajasthan, 2Department of Pharmacology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Safedabad, Barabanki, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaIntroduction: Poor reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by doctors is a major hindrance to successful pharmacovigilance. The present study was designed to assess first-year residents’ knowledge of ADR reporting.Methods: First-year postgraduate doctors at a private medical college completed a structured questionnaire. The responses were analyzed by nonparametric methods.Results: All doctors were aware of the term “adverse drug reactions.” Fifty percent of the doctors reported being taught about ADR reporting during their undergraduate teaching, and 50% had witnessed ADRs in their internship training. Ten percent of patients suffering an ADR observed and reported by doctors required prolonged hospitalization for treatment as a result. Only 40% of interns reported the ADRs that they observed, while 60% did not report them. Twenty-eight percent reported ADRs to the head of the department, 8% to an ADR monitoring committee, and 4% to the pharmacovigilance center. Eighty-six percent of the doctors surveyed felt that a good knowledge of undergraduate clinical pharmacology therapeutics would have improved the level of ADR reporting.Conclusion: The knowledge of first-year doctors regarding ADR reporting is quite poor. There is a dire need to incorporate ADR reporting into undergraduate teaching, and to reinforce this during internships and periodically thereafter.Keywords: ADR reporting, pharmacovigilance, first-year postgraduate doctors
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