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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 501 matches for " Serap Aksoy "
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Solutions to Neglected Tropical Diseases Require Vibrant Local Scientific Communities
Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000662
Abstract:
Sleeping Sickness Elimination in Sight: Time to Celebrate and Reflect, but Not Relax
Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001008
Abstract:
Strong Local Scientific Communities Are Essential to Reach the Millennium Development Goals
Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2015, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004136
Abstract:
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases: Two Years of Providing Access to Innovation for the World's Poor … and Counting
Peter J. Hotez ,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000494
Abstract:
Control Using Genetically Modified Insects Poses Problems for Regulators
Michael J. Lehane ,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001495
Abstract:
An Interfaith Dialogue on the Neglected Tropical Diseases
Peter J. Hotez ,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001240
Abstract:
Now We Are Six
Peter J. Hotez ,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001862
Abstract:
Neglected Funding for Vector-Borne Diseases: A Near Miss This Time, a Possible Disaster the Next Time
A. Desirée LaBeaud,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000847
Abstract:
Tsetse Immune System Maturation Requires the Presence of Obligate Symbionts in Larvae
Brian L. Weiss,Jingwen Wang,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000619
Abstract: Beneficial microbial symbionts serve important functions within their hosts, including dietary supplementation and maintenance of immune system homeostasis. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable these bacteria to induce specific host phenotypes during development and into adulthood. Here we used the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans, and its obligate mutualist, Wigglesworthia glossinidia, to investigate the co-evolutionary adaptations that influence the development of host physiological processes. Wigglesworthia is maternally transmitted to tsetse's intrauterine larvae through milk gland secretions. We can produce flies that lack Wigglesworthia (GmmWgm?) yet retain their other symbiotic microbes. Such offspring give rise to adults that exhibit a largely normal phenotype, with the exception being that they are reproductively sterile. Our results indicate that when reared under normal environmental conditions GmmWgm? adults are also immuno-compromised and highly susceptible to hemocoelic E. coli infections while age-matched wild-type individuals are refractory. Adults that lack Wigglesworthia during larval development exhibit exceptionally compromised cellular and humoral immune responses following microbial challenge, including reduced expression of genes that encode antimicrobial peptides (cecropin and attacin), hemocyte-mediated processes (thioester-containing proteins 2 and 4 and prophenoloxidase), and signal-mediating molecules (inducible nitric oxide synthase). Furthermore, GmmWgm? adults harbor a reduced population of sessile and circulating hemocytes, a phenomenon that likely results from a significant decrease in larval expression of serpent and lozenge, both of which are associated with the process of early hemocyte differentiation. Our results demonstrate that Wigglesworthia must be present during the development of immature progeny in order for the immune system to function properly in adult tsetse. This phenomenon provides evidence of yet another important physiological adaptation that further anchors the obligate symbiosis between tsetse and Wigglesworthia.
Tsetse Immune System Maturation Requires the Presence of Obligate Symbionts in Larvae
Brian L. Weiss ,Jingwen Wang,Serap Aksoy
PLOS Biology , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000619
Abstract: Beneficial microbial symbionts serve important functions within their hosts, including dietary supplementation and maintenance of immune system homeostasis. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable these bacteria to induce specific host phenotypes during development and into adulthood. Here we used the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans, and its obligate mutualist, Wigglesworthia glossinidia, to investigate the co-evolutionary adaptations that influence the development of host physiological processes. Wigglesworthia is maternally transmitted to tsetse's intrauterine larvae through milk gland secretions. We can produce flies that lack Wigglesworthia (GmmWgm?) yet retain their other symbiotic microbes. Such offspring give rise to adults that exhibit a largely normal phenotype, with the exception being that they are reproductively sterile. Our results indicate that when reared under normal environmental conditions GmmWgm? adults are also immuno-compromised and highly susceptible to hemocoelic E. coli infections while age-matched wild-type individuals are refractory. Adults that lack Wigglesworthia during larval development exhibit exceptionally compromised cellular and humoral immune responses following microbial challenge, including reduced expression of genes that encode antimicrobial peptides (cecropin and attacin), hemocyte-mediated processes (thioester-containing proteins 2 and 4 and prophenoloxidase), and signal-mediating molecules (inducible nitric oxide synthase). Furthermore, GmmWgm? adults harbor a reduced population of sessile and circulating hemocytes, a phenomenon that likely results from a significant decrease in larval expression of serpent and lozenge, both of which are associated with the process of early hemocyte differentiation. Our results demonstrate that Wigglesworthia must be present during the development of immature progeny in order for the immune system to function properly in adult tsetse. This phenomenon provides evidence of yet another important physiological adaptation that further anchors the obligate symbiosis between tsetse and Wigglesworthia.
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