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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10 matches for " Seizi Sukemori "
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L-Carnitine Contents in the Tissues of Rabbits Fed Urea as an Alternative of Dietary Protein  [PDF]
Seizi Sukemori, Satoshi Odo
Open Journal of Animal Sciences (OJAS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojas.2017.71001
Abstract: The present study was aimed to observe the effects of urea ingestion, non-protein nitrogen, on the disorder of nitrogen metabolism with the L-carnitine contents using the blood, kidney, liver, and femoral muscle as markers. A total of 8 Japanese white rabbits were used in this experiment. They were fed a basal diet prepared for the control group and the nitrogen volume proportionated to one-third of CP 14%, was replaced with urea in the feed of the experimental group for 7 days. On the final day, the animals were fasted from the previous evening and sacrificed. Blood was collected into a test tube at the same time of the sacrifice and their heart, kidney, liver and femoral muscle were collected. The L-carnitine contents in each sample and the urea in the blood were determined. The results of the growth test showed that there was no significant difference. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the contents of L-carnitine and urea in each sample. It was concluded that nitrogen replacement of the diet with urea, in the range of 1/3 of dietary protein, had neither effect on the maintenance of body weight nor nitrogen balance, including the de novo synthesis of L-carnitine.
Methionine and Threonine Requirements of Dutch Rabbits Fed under a Cecotrophy Prevention Program  [PDF]
Yumi Abe, Hitoshi Muramatsu, Seizi Sukemori
Open Journal of Animal Sciences (OJAS) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ojas.2019.92014
Abstract: It is suggested that the difference in body size between domestic-type rabbits and small pet-type rabbits results in different nutrient requirements. The nutritional requirements of pet rabbits have been assessed, although such assessments require evaluation throughout the rabbit life span. The present study was conducted under a cecotrophy prevention program with young and adult rabbits. Six male Dutch rabbits were housed individually in a dormitory-type cage, and they were randomly fed graded levels of dietary methionine and threonine, at ratios of 4:0, 3:1, 2:2, 1:3, and 0:4 mixed with two types of feed, 4:0 and 0:4. Four days after switching diets and 4 hrs after starting morning feeding, approximately one milliliter of blood was collected from the vein of the ear. Free amino acid concentrations in the plasma were determined with a high-speed amino acid analyzer. Plasma concentrations of methionine and threonine compared to dietary methionine and threonine levels are shown in young rabbits. The plasma concentration of methionine remained constant at a low level and then increased linearly. The intersection was estimated as 0.16 g/d. In the same manner, the intersection of the plasma threonine value was estimated as 0.27 g/d. These values were calculated as 0.27% and 0.47% of the diets, respectively. In the case of adult rabbits, the baseline was not obtained for dietary methionine and threonine levels. The methionine requirement was estimated as 0.11 g/d. The threonine requirement was estimated as 0.22 g/d. These values were calculated as 0.15% and 0.30% of the diets, respectively. In comparison with young and adult rabbits, both methionine and threonine showed a low baseline level in young rabbits, while their variations in plasma levels of adult rabbits were not determined. The requirement of both amino acids in young rabbits is higher than that in adult rabbits. The dietary values of both amino acids in young rabbits were also higher than those in adult rabbits. Small pet-type adult rabbits required lower amino acid levels
Mate Choice and Copulation Frequency in the Burying Beetle Nicrophorus quadripunctatus (Coleoptera: Silphidae): Effect of Male Body Size and Presence of a Rival
Seizi Suzuki
Psyche , 2009, DOI: 10.1155/2009/904604
Abstract: It is widely assumed that there exists a competition between males for mating and that females prefer males with elaborate male traits. Further, such traits are considered to be synonymous with high quality in terms of benefits to females. The number and duration of copulations and the frequency of mate refusal between large and small Nicrophorus quadripunctatus males were examined both for single males and for two males competing. The number of copulations was not affected by the size of the male or by the presence of a rival, but there was a significant interaction such that large males increased their number of copulations when a small rival was present. Copulation duration was not affected by male size but was shortened by a rival male. Females rejected copulation attempts of small males more often than of large males, whether the males were alone or paired with a rival. These results suggest that large males have two advantages: they win contests between males and are preferred by females.
Does Experience Affect the Outcome of Male-Male Contests in the Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus quadripunctatus?
Seizi Suzuki
Psyche , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/859835
Abstract: The bigger individual in a fight usually wins unless the smaller individual is a resident or has recently won a fight. I conducted three experiments on the effects of body size, residency, and fight history on the outcome of male-male fights in a burying beetle. Fights were staged between an intruding male and the male of a male-female pair. When males differed in size, the larger male usually won regardless of residency or individual fight histories. Residents and winners of previous fights won only when competing males were similar in size. Hence, male body size largely determines the outcomes of fights in this beetle. 1. Introduction Fighting between males over mating opportunities is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom and has received much empirical attention [1]. Fighting ability is often correlated with morphological and physiological attributes such as body size, weaponry, and ornaments [1], but these are not the only attributes that may determine fighting ability. It has been hypothesized that the “prior residence effect” can also affect the outcome of fighting contests in accordance with the convention “resident wins, intruder retreats” [2]. A third effect is the “winner-loser effect,” in which winners are more likely to win again and losers are more likely to lose again [3]. These two effects sometimes counteract morphological and physiological attributes (e.g., [4]). The complex parental behaviour of burying beetles (Nicrophorus: Silphidae) has been well-studied (reviewed in [5, 6]). Nicrophorus exploits small vertebrate carrions as food for its young. A male-female pair prepares a carcass by burying it, removing its hair, and rounding it into a ball. Eggs are then laid in the soil adjacent to the carrion ball. After hatching, the larvae crawl to the carrion ball, where they are fed by parental regurgitations. Nicrophorus is generally monogamous [7–9], and both sexes display intense intrasexual competition [10, 11]. Two or more individuals of both sexes often locate the same carcass, but usually only a single dominant pair eventually occupies the carcass. Resident males are more likely to be injured than resident females [12], and males have a greater tendency to guard [13, 14]. Contests between males are expected to be more intense than those between females. Larger individuals of Nicrophorus usually win contests among conspecifics in N. humator [10] or in N. quadripunctatus [11]. However, the presence of the winner effect is supported by a previous study of N. humator [15], and it is possible that other attributes affect the
Clinical and laboratory parameters in dapsone acute intoxication
Carrazza,Maria Zilda N; Carrazza,Francisco R; Oga,Seizi;
Revista de Saúde Pública , 2000, DOI: 10.1590/S0034-89102000000400013
Abstract: objective: to determine the severity of dapsone (dds) acute intoxication ? an uncommon medical event ? using clinical and laboratory parameters. methods: two hundred and seventy four patients with acute dds intoxication, aged 1 month to 50 years old, were studied and classified into four age groups. clinical evaluation was assessed through a protocol and correlated with laboratory parameters. spectrophotometric methods were used to analyze methemoglobinemia (mhbp) and dapsonemia (ddsp). results: the most prevalent clinical sign of intoxication was cyanosis, seen in 65.7% of the patients and in 100% of children less than 5 years of age. according to laboratory criteria, mhbp-related severe clinical intoxication was seen in 56.2% and ddsp-related occurred in 58% of the patients. regarding ddsp, intoxication was considered severe when 20 tablets (100 mg each) were ingested, a median of 29 mg/ml. regarding mhbp, intoxication was severe when 7.5 tablets were ingested, a median of 38% of the total hb. the correlation between mhbp and ddsp was statistically significant (n=144, r=0.32, p<0.05). negative correlation was observed between mhbp and the time elapsed since dds intake (n=124, r=-0.34, p<0.001). there was also a negative correlation between ddsp and the time elapsed since dds intake (n=63, r=-0.35, p<0.0001). conclusions: longitudinal analysis showed a significant association between methemoglobinemia and the time elapsed after the intake (t), according to the equation: dapsonemia = 12.9256 - 0.0682t + 0.234 methemoglobinemia
Clinical and laboratory parameters in dapsone acute intoxication
Carrazza Maria Zilda N,Carrazza Francisco R,Oga Seizi
Revista de Saúde Pública , 2000,
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine the severity of dapsone (DDS) acute intoxication - an uncommon medical event - using clinical and laboratory parameters. METHODS: Two hundred and seventy four patients with acute DDS intoxication, aged 1 month to 50 years old, were studied and classified into four age groups. Clinical evaluation was assessed through a protocol and correlated with laboratory parameters. Spectrophotometric methods were used to analyze methemoglobinemia (MHbp) and dapsonemia (DDSp). RESULTS: The most prevalent clinical sign of intoxication was cyanosis, seen in 65.7% of the patients and in 100% of children less than 5 years of age. According to laboratory criteria, MHbp-related severe clinical intoxication was seen in 56.2% and DDSp-related occurred in 58% of the patients. Regarding DDSp, intoxication was considered severe when 20 tablets (100 mg each) were ingested, a median of 29 mug/ml. Regarding MHbp, intoxication was severe when 7.5 tablets were ingested, a median of 38% of the total Hb. The correlation between MHbp and DDSp was statistically significant (n=144, r=0.32, p<0.05). Negative correlation was observed between MHbp and the time elapsed since DDS intake (n=124, r=-0.34, p<0.001). There was also a negative correlation between DDSp and the time elapsed since DDS intake (n=63, r=-0.35, p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal analysis showed a significant association between methemoglobinemia and the time elapsed after the intake (t), according to the equation: Dapsonemia = 12.9256 - 0.0682t + 0.234 methemoglobinemia
Estudo toxicológico e farmacológico dos extratos fluídos de Cissus sicyoides L.
Silva, Geraldo Alves da;Araújo, Luciene C. L.;Oga, Seizi;Akisue, Gokithi;
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 1996, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-695X1996000200001
Abstract: the fluid extracts obtained from cissus sicyoides l., commonly known as "cipó-pucá" and "insulina", were tested pharmacologically and toxicologically. the extracts show some hypoglycemic activity, but the results were not significant. no toxic activity was observed.
Extrapyramidal side effects as a consequence of treatment with neuroleptics
Wanessa Alves Frederico,Seizi Oga,Maria de Lourdes Rabelo Pequeno,Shirley Fumi Taniguchi
Einstein (S?o Paulo) , 2008,
Abstract: Objective: To check the occurrence of extrapyramidal side effects inpatients receiving neuroleptic drugs, how these effects are treated,and to observe the occurrence of hallucinations caused by treatmentof extrapyramidal symptoms. Methods: The present study analyzedmedical records and interviewed 39 schizophrenic patients beingtreated in a public primary care clinic located in the southern partof the city of S o Paulo, who had previously agreed to participatein the project. Results: Among 39 patients studied, 85% presentedextrapyramidal symptoms. Of these, 69.7% were treated for theside effects, 73.9% were treated with biperiden and 26.09% hadtheir neuroleptic drug reduced. Out of those patients treated withbiperiden, 70.5% had side effects, such as hallucination and delusion,blurred vision, somnolence and verbal memory deficit. Conclusions:The majority of patients (85%) undergoing treatment with neurolepticdrugs developed motor side effects. When these extrapyramidalsymptoms were treated with central action anticholinergic drugs(biperiden), hallucination and/or delusion occurred in 52.94% ofpatients – probably because of increased dopaminergic activity asa consequence of cholinergic activity reduction caused by biperidenin the mesocortical and mesolimbic pathways.
Prediction of Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins from Sequences Using Support Vector Machines
Seizi Someya,Masanori Kakuta,Mizuki Morita,Kazuya Sumikoshi,Wei Cao,Zhenyi Ge,Osamu Hirose,Shugo Nakamura,Tohru Terada,Kentaro Shimizu
Advances in Bioinformatics , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/289301
Abstract: Carbohydrate-binding proteins are proteins that can interact with sugar chains but do not modify them. They are involved in many physiological functions, and we have developed a method for predicting them from their amino acid sequences. Our method is based on support vector machines (SVMs). We first clarified the definition of carbohydrate-binding proteins and then constructed positive and negative datasets with which the SVMs were trained. By applying the leave-one-out test to these datasets, our method delivered 0.92 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. We also examined two amino acid grouping methods that enable effective learning of sequence patterns and evaluated the performance of these methods. When we applied our method in combination with the homology-based prediction method to the annotated human genome database, H-invDB, we found that the true positive rate of prediction was improved. 1. Introduction Sugar chains and carbohydrate-binding proteins play important roles in several biological processes such as cell-to-cell signaling, protein folding, subcellular localization, ligand recognition, and developmental processes [1]. With the rapid increase in the amount of available glycoprotein data (i.e., protein sequences), there is a growing interest in the functions, physicochemical properties, and tertiary structures of carbohydrate-binding proteins and in their applications. Experimental work to identify carbohydrate-binding proteins is costly and time consuming, so computational methods to predict carbohydrate-binding proteins would be useful. Carbohydrate-binding proteins are nonantibody proteins that can interact with sugar chains, and various keywords are used to annotate them in biological databases: “carbohydrate-binding protein”, “lectin”, and so on. The term “lectin” is widely used but there is no general consensus as to its definition. The Shiga toxin B subunit, for example, has been annotated “lectin-like” as well as “lectin.” Furthermore, heparin-binding proteins and hyaluronic-acid-binding proteins are also carbohydrate-binding proteins, but are not usually annotated “carbohydrate-binding protein” or “lectin.” In the work reported in this paper, we first collected carbohydrate-binding proteins of various kinds, including enzymes and proteins not explicitly annotated as “carbohydrate-binding protein,” and specified a set of search conditions for carbohydrate-binding proteins in the amino acid sequence database UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). Based on the collected proteins, we developed a
Investigation on synthesis and physical properties of metal doped picene solids
Takashi Kambe,Xuexia He,Yosuke Takahashi,Yusuke Yamanari,Kazuya Teranishi,Hiroki Mitamura,Seizi Shibasaki,Keitaro Tomita,Ritsuko Eguchi,Hidenori Goto,Yasuhiro Takabayashi,Takashi Kato,Akihiko Fujiwara,Toshikaze Kariyado,Hideo Aoki,Yoshihiro Kubozono
Physics , 2012, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.86.214507
Abstract: We report electronic structure and physical properties of metal doped picene as well as selective synthesis of the phase exhibiting 18 K superconducting transition. First, Raman scattering is used to characterize the number of electrons transferred from the dopants to picene molecules. The charge transfer leads to a softening of Raman scattering peaks, which enables us to determine the number of transferred electrons. From this we have identified that three electrons are transferred to each picene molecule in the superconducting doped-picene solids. Second, we report the pressure dependence of Tc in 7 and 18 K phases of K3picene. The 7 K phase shows a negative pressure-dependence, while the 18 K phase exhibits a positive pressure-dependence which cannot be understood with a simple phonon mechanism of BCS superconductivity. Third, we report a new synthesis method for superconducting K3picene by a solution process with monomethylamine, CH3NH2. This method enables one to prepare selectively the K3picene sample exhibiting 18 K superconducting transition. The discovery of suitable way for preparing K3picene with Tc = 18 K may facilitate clarification of the mechanism of superconductivity.
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