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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1429 matches for " Saori Yamaguchi "
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Association of the Cardioankle Vascular Index and Ankle-Brachial Index with Carotid Artery Intima Media Thickness in Hemodialysis Patients
Tomohito Gohda,Hiromichi Gotoh,Yoshikazu Gotoh,Saori Yamaguchi,Yasuhiko Tomino
International Journal of Nephrology , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/401525
Abstract: The objectives of the present study are (1) to compare the cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT) between HD patients with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D) or prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease and (2) also to evaluate the relationship of these indices with CA-IMT in these patients according to ABI levels. This study consisted of 132 HD patients with T2D and the same number of patients without T2D. The patients with diabetes or prevalence of CV disease had significantly higher CA-IMT and lower ABI values than those without diabetes or prevalence of CV disease, respectively. Although diabetic patients had higher CAVI than those without diabetes, CAVI did not differ between patients with or without prevalence of CV disease. In univariate analysis, CA-IMT was more strongly correlated with ABI than CAVI. However, the opposite was true in patients with an ABI value of more than 0.95. Both indices were significantly correlated with CA-IMT although ABI was a powerful determinant than CAVI. It appears that both indices are associated with CA-IMT in HD patients, especially with an ABI value of more than 0.95. 1. Introduction Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are major causes of death in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), especially for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Carotid artery IMT (CA-IMT) is one of the most established predictors of death from CV disease independent of other classical risk factors in hemodialysis (HD) patients [1–3], although recent studies reported that the association between CA-IMT progression assessed from two ultrasound scans and CV disease remains unproven in general population [4, 5]. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is used to diagnose peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD), and for patients, with an ABI value of less than 0.90, it is accepted as a reliable marker for PAOD [6]. A lower ABI value has also been shown to be significantly associated with CV diseases [7]. On the other hand, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a useful marker for measuring arterial stiffness, one aspect of arteriosclerosis [8]. Several studies have demonstrated that both indices reflect the severity of carotid arteriosclerosis and predict all-cause and CV mortality in HD patients [9–12]. However, one drawback of baPWV is that it is affected by changes in blood pressure during measurements. Recently, a novel arterial stiffness parameter, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), was developed by measuring baPWV and blood pressure. Unlike baPWV, CAVI is
Podocyte loss and albuminuria of KK-Ay mouse: A spontaneous animal model for human type 2 diabetic nephropathy  [PDF]
Yuji Ishikawa, Takamichi Ito, Mitsuo Tanimoto, Shinji Hagiwara, Masako Furukawa, Saori Yamaguchi, Keisuke Omote, Katsuhiko Asanuma, Tomohito Gohda, Yoshio Shimizu, Kazuhiko Funabiki, Satoshi Horikoshi, Yasuhiko Tomino
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus (JDM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jdm.2012.23054
Abstract: Podocyte loss was well known in type 2 diabetic nephropathy patients. The objective of the present study was to determine the number of podocytes and the degree of albuminuria in diabetic KK-Ay/Ta (KK-Ay) mice which had been reported as diabetic nephropathy model. Diabetic KK-Ay mice, diabetic KK/Ta mice and non-diabetic BALB/cA Jcl (BALB/cA) mice were studied. We analyzed glomerular lesions in all mice by morphometric analysis and immunofluorescence to determine the number of podocytes. Level of urinary albumin was also measured. Glomerular enlargement and mesangial expansion were observed in KK-Ay mice. Mean number of podocytes per glomerulus (NG pod) in diabetic KK-Ay mice was significantly lower than that in non-diabetic BALB/cA mice. Mean NG pod/glomerular area (GA) per glomerulus was also significantly decreased in diabetic KK-Ay mice. The level of urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) in diabetic KK-Ay mice was significantly higher than that in non-diabetic BALB/cA mice. These data suggest that podocyte loss might induce albuminuria in KK-Ay mice. This finding confirmed our previous report that KK-Ay mice, especially in terms of histological findings, are a suitable animal model for glomerular injury in type 2 diabetic nephropathy.
Nursing Activities at Health Surveys and Health Checkups during the Early Period of Operation of the Hiroshima ABCC—Oral History Study Based on Narratives of Three Japanese Nurses  [PDF]
Saori Funaki, Mizue Shiromaru
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2018.81006
Abstract:
Using an oral history approach, this study analyzed the narratives obtained from semi-structured interviews administered to three Japanese women who worked as nurses for the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC). The analysis of the data in the narratives showed details of the health surveys and health checkups conducted during the early period of operation of ABCC. During the early period of operation of ABCC some survivors showed negative behaviors toward the health surveys and health checkups at the ABCC. However, it can be inferred that dedicated nursing played an important role in alleviating the stress and emotional issues of survivors at the health surveys and health checkups. The findings of the study could be beneficial to research into nursing activities for patients exposed to radiation at the present day.
Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei
Saori Pastore
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A $\le$ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.
Effect of Exercise on Kidney Function, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetic KK-Ay Mice
Yuji Ishikawa,Tomohito Gohda,Mitsuo Tanimoto,Keisuke Omote,Masako Furukawa,Saori Yamaguchi,Maki Murakoshi,Shinji Hagiwara,Satoshi Horikoshi,Kazuhiko Funabiki,Yasuhiko Tomino
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/702948
Abstract: Exercise is recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, but its effects on diabetic nephropathy (DN) are still unknown. We hypothesized that appropriate exercise improves early DN via attenuation of inflammation and oxidative damage. Type 2 diabetic KK- mice, a spontaneous DN model, underwent two different kinds of exercise (i.e., moderate and low intensity). Sedentary mice or those undergoing an exercise regimen causing no significant body weight loss were used. We examined the urinary excretion of albumin, number of podocytes and macrophages, renal expressions of HIF-1α and MCP-1, and biomarkers of oxidative stress such as urinary 8-OHdG and serum SOD. Exercise reduced urinary levels of albumin and also maintained the number of podocytes in the exercised KK- mice independently of improvements of overweight and hyperglycemia, although moderate-intensity exercise increased expression of HIF-1α. Sedentary KK- mice showed increased expression of MCP-1 and infiltration of macrophage, increased urinary 8-OhdG, and decreased serum SOD levels compared with exercised KK- mice. On the whole, low-intensity exercise attenuates progression of early DN without affecting marked renal ischemia. Reduction rates of urinary albumin and maintained podocyte numbers, with parallel improvements in oxidative damage and inflammation, are related to beneficial effects of exercise in diabetic kidney disease.
Effect of Exercise on Kidney Function, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetic KK-Ay Mice
Yuji Ishikawa,Tomohito Gohda,Mitsuo Tanimoto,Keisuke Omote,Masako Furukawa,Saori Yamaguchi,Maki Murakoshi,Shinji Hagiwara,Satoshi Horikoshi,Kazuhiko Funabiki,Yasuhiko Tomino
Journal of Diabetes Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/702948
Abstract: Exercise is recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, but its effects on diabetic nephropathy (DN) are still unknown. We hypothesized that appropriate exercise improves early DN via attenuation of inflammation and oxidative damage. Type 2 diabetic KK- mice, a spontaneous DN model, underwent two different kinds of exercise (i.e., moderate and low intensity). Sedentary mice or those undergoing an exercise regimen causing no significant body weight loss were used. We examined the urinary excretion of albumin, number of podocytes and macrophages, renal expressions of HIF-1α and MCP-1, and biomarkers of oxidative stress such as urinary 8-OHdG and serum SOD. Exercise reduced urinary levels of albumin and also maintained the number of podocytes in the exercised KK- mice independently of improvements of overweight and hyperglycemia, although moderate-intensity exercise increased expression of HIF-1α. Sedentary KK- mice showed increased expression of MCP-1 and infiltration of macrophage, increased urinary 8-OhdG, and decreased serum SOD levels compared with exercised KK- mice. On the whole, low-intensity exercise attenuates progression of early DN without affecting marked renal ischemia. Reduction rates of urinary albumin and maintained podocyte numbers, with parallel improvements in oxidative damage and inflammation, are related to beneficial effects of exercise in diabetic kidney disease. 1. Introduction Recent studies suggest that a chronic inflammatory process and oxidative stress promote the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN) [1–4]. We have also showed the presence of macrophage infiltration and increased MCP-1 expressions and levels in glomeruli and urine of KK- mice, a frequently used animal model of type 2 diabetes (T2D) [5, 6]. Furthermore, urinary 8-OHdG, a marker of oxidative DNA damage, was also increased in this mouse model [7]. Lifestyle modification, especially appropriate exercise, is recommended for the management of T2D through improvements of metabolic risk factors such as blood pressure, blood glucose, plasma lipids, and oxidative stress markers. On the other hand, this also consumes considerable amounts of oxygen, leading to production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There is also evidence that ROS and high glucose exposure contribute to podocyte apoptosis in experimental DN [8]. It is considered that exercise-induced proteinuria is usually not permanent but evanescent [9, 10]. Moreover it is little known that moderate exercise has adverse effect on the renal function [11–14]. Several studies reported that
The Acquisition of Complex Structures: The Case of Child ESL  [PDF]
Yumiko Yamaguchi
Open Journal of Modern Linguistics (OJML) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojml.2013.33030
Abstract:

This study examines how complex linguistic structures are acquired in child English as a second language. The spontaneous speech producing by a Japanese primary school child, learning English in a naturalistic environment, was audio-recorded regularly over two years and the development of complex syntactic structures containing subordinate clauses was compared with the acquisition of other English morphosyntactic structures as represented within Processability Theory (PT) (Pienemann, 1998; Pienemann, Di Biase, & Kawaguchi, 2005). Although PT predicts that subordination is acquired at the highest stage in processability hierarchy, the results in this longitudinal study show that some of the subordinate constructions emerge at earlier stages in child ESL acquisition.

Attenuated Food Anticipatory Activity and Abnormal Circadian Locomotor Rhythms in Rgs16 Knockdown Mice
Naoto Hayasaka,Kazuyuki Aoki,Saori Kinoshita,Shoutaroh Yamaguchi,John K. Wakefield,Sachiyo Tsuji-Kawahara,Kazumasa Horikawa,Hiroshi Ikegami,Shigeharu Wakana,Takamichi Murakami,Ram Ramabhadran,Masaaki Miyazawa,Shigenobu Shibata
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017655
Abstract: Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a multi-functional protein family, which functions in part as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) of G protein α-subunits to terminate G protein signaling. Previous studies have demonstrated that the Rgs16 transcripts exhibit robust circadian rhythms both in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian light-entrainable oscillator (LEO) of the hypothalamus, and in the liver. To investigate the role of RGS16 in the circadian clock in vivo, we generated two independent transgenic mouse lines using lentiviral vectors expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting the Rgs16 mRNA. The knockdown mice demonstrated significantly shorter free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and reduced total activity as compared to the wild-type siblings. In addition, when feeding was restricted during the daytime, food-entrainable oscillator (FEO)-driven elevated food-anticipatory activity (FAA) observed prior to the scheduled feeding time was significantly attenuated in the knockdown mice. Whereas the restricted feeding phase-advanced the rhythmic expression of the Per2 clock gene in liver and thalamus in the wild-type animals, the above phase shift was not observed in the knockdown mice. This is the first in vivo demonstration that a common regulator of G protein signaling is involved in the two separate, but interactive circadian timing systems, LEO and FEO. The present study also suggests that liver and/or thalamus regulate the food-entrained circadian behavior through G protein-mediated signal transduction pathway(s).
Physical Education and the Degree of Stress
Nobuki Ishii, Saori Osaka
Journal of Human Kinetics , 2010, DOI: 10.2478/v10078-010-0024-3
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine a relationship between the degree of liking and disliking of sport and physical activity, and stress development. We conducted a survey on Japanese junior high school students (129 boys, 139 girls) in 2007. The survey included such entries as 1) positive vs negative attitude toward physical education classes, 2) the degree of physical education classes-related stress, and 3) personality qualities (goal orientation, sports competence and active coping). In our survey concerning the degree of predilection for physical education classes, the results were as follows: 171 subjects in Group A said they liked physical education classes; 39 subjects in Group B said they didn't like and 57 subjects in Group C chose "neither". Comparing the degree of stress from physical education classes, Group A scored significantly lower than the others by Tukey's multiple comparison test (p<0.05). Also, in order to find the key factor which determines the degree of liking and disliking of physical education classes, we measured various values among 52 subjects with a high degree of stress as a dependent variable, and analyzed the personality aspects as an independent variable. As a result, we found a negative correlation between stress levels and sports competence, whereas ego orientation and active coping had a positive effect on the degree of stress. We showed that those liking physical education experienced low degrees of stress. Conversely, those individuals disliking sport and physical activity should not be expected to experience reduced stress while participating in sports. Furthermore, we can indicate sports competence as a determinant of stress reduction. Consequently, in order to stimulate regular participation in sports activity and to release its stress-reducing potential, it is necessary to develop childhood physical education classes to foster sports competence.
A Report on the Size of Information Unit to Extract Contents on the Web Text
Saori Kitahara,Kenji Hatano
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract:
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