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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 464877 matches for " Ryan A. Kunjal "
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Adrenal insufficiency and bowel obstruction: An overlooked association  [PDF]
Ryan A. Kunjal, Ria R. Ramadoo, Surujpal Teelucksingh, Vijay Naraynsingh
Case Reports in Clinical Medicine (CRCM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/crcm.2013.22029
Abstract:

Bowel obstruction is a documented but rare presentation of adrenal insufficiency (AI). We report a case of acute AI manifesting as intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) in a patient with underlying iatrogenic adrenal suppression. An 83 years old female was admitted for partial small bowel obstruction that failed to resolve with conservative management. She then underwent exploratory laparotomy where no mechanical obstruction was found and the small bowel was manually decompressed. Postoperatively she developed acute swelling of her right ankle which was similar to mono-articular attacks in the past. This was diagnosed clinically as gout. Her obstruction failed to settle and a second laparotomy was done which yielded the same as the first. Given her past account of arthritic pain, direct questioning of steroid use unearthed a history of multiple intra-articular corticosteroid injections for analgesia. She also described several short courses of high dose oral steroids for respiratory tract infections, including a recent course which was abruptly stopped two days prior to presentation. Clinical suspicion of AI was supported by biochemical testing of stress cortisol levels and change in the serum cortisol in response to 250 μg of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone. Moreover, her improvement following a therapeutic trial of steroid replacement was dramatic and strongly supports this diagnosis. It is therefore worthwhile to consider a diagnosis of AI in cases of bowel obstruction in patients with comorbidities that predispose to steroid use and especially in settings where steroid abuse is prevalent.

Site Specific Uncertainty in Regional Haze RuleHaze Indexes  [PDF]
Patrick A. Ryan
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (ACS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/acs.2012.21001
Abstract: In 1999, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the regional haze rule (RHR). The RHR default implementation plan calls for each class I area 20% worst baseline (2000-2004) visibility to improve linearly in time to natural conditions in 2064 and in calendar year 2018, each class I area 20% worst visibility is to comply with the 2018 visibility that falls on the linear improvement glide path from baseline (2000-2004) to natural (2064) conditions. This study shows that accurately assessing compliance depends on assessing the uncertainty in baseline, natural and 2018 visibility estimates. This study identifies ±3 dV and ±4 dV of uncertainty in 20% worst natural and baseline visibility estimates. The percent uncertainty in calculated 2018 glide path visibility values ranges from 10% - 45%.
AN INTELLIGENT DECISION SUPPORT USING GENETIC FUZZY INTEGRATION FOR CAPABILITY ANALYSIS
Kunjal B. Mankad
Journal of Global Research in Computer Science , 2011,
Abstract: Soft Computing is a consortium of computing methodologies that provides a foundation for the conception, design, and deployment of intelligent systems to provide economical and feasible solutions with reduced complexity. Fuzzy Logic deals with uncertainty and imprecision for real world’s problems while Genetic Algorithm mimics natural evolution with robust search. The hybridization of Genetic-Fuzzy Systems is gaining popularity in handling real world problems in different domains. The paper focuses on education domain in order to identify human capabilities. Here, integrated genetic-fuzzy approach is utilized for evolving rules automatically. It discusses need of intelligent decision support, role of genetic-fuzzy hybridization with literature survey in various application domains, Theory of Multiple Intelligence and its types. The paper presents a novel architecture using genetic fuzzy techniques for intelligent decision support to classify human intelligence. Theory of Multiple Intelligence has been utilized for prototype implementation of the system. Result is presented in form of charts showing capabilities for different user categories. Keywords- Genetic Fuzzy Systems (GFS), Soft Computing (SC) and Theory of Multiple Intelligence (MI).
UTILIZATION OF WEB SERVICES FOR SERVICE ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE
Kunjal B. Mankad
Journal of Global Research in Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: Rapid evolution of software architectures has become nowadays trend, in which distributed processing has proven highly efficient. Multiple architectures for distributed processing are available based on object oriented and component oriented concepts having their own advantages and limitations. The main aspect of developing the consistent architectural framework is to reduce the development cost of IT solutions and to integrate the business partners and customers with various capabilities with a clear vision in a easily manageable, quick and reusable fashion. Service Oriented Architecture is architecture, which is independent from any certain technology. The opening section of the paper highlights limitations of current software architectures as well as it focuses on need of Service Oriented Architecture by emphasizing various architectural aspects including role of service. The second section presents the characteristics of Web Services with their advantages. It also shows that how Web Services fulfill the requirement of frequently changing needs of business industries by implementing Service Oriented Architecture. The last section of the paper presents the application of Web Services in implementing Service Oriented Architecture. A prototype example of Web Service is developed to show the efficiency of the proposed approach. Keywords: Service Oriented Architecture, Service, Web Service, and WSDL.
AN INTELLIGENT DECISION SUPPORT USING GENETIC FUZZY INTEGRATION FOR CAPABILITY ANALYSIS
Kunjal B. Mankad
Journal of Global Research in Computer Science , 2011,
Abstract: Soft Computing is a consortium of computing methodologies that provides a foundation for the conception, design, and deployment of intelligent systems to provide economical and feasible solutions with reduced complexity. Fuzzy Logic deals with uncertainty and imprecision for real world’s problems while Genetic Algorithm mimics natural evolution with robust search. The hybridization of Genetic-Fuzzy Systems is gaining popularity in handling real world problems in different domains. The paper focuses on education domain in order to identify human capabilities. Here, integrated genetic-fuzzy approach is utilized for evolving rules automatically. It discusses need of intelligent decision support, role of genetic-fuzzy hybridization with literature survey in various application domains, Theory of Multiple Intelligence and its types. The paper presents a novel architecture using genetic fuzzy techniques for intelligent decision support to classify human intelligence. Theory of Multiple Intelligence has been utilized for prototype implementation of the system. Result is presented in form of charts showing capabilities for different user categories. Keywords: Genetic Fuzzy Systems (GFS), Soft Computing (SC) and Theory of Multiple Intelligence (MI).
Polymer Nanotechnology: the Quest for Motility
Ryan A.
Proceedings of the International Conference Nanomaterials : Applications and Properties , 2012,
Abstract: We ask the question "what will a realistic nanobot look like?". The answer is something like a bacterium (such as e. coli) or a sperm. Both of these have a propulsion mechanism (a flagellum), a capsule containing a chemical payload and a system of sensors to detect food or the target for the payload. It is be soft and wet, just like biology, and to exemplify this we have built a series of biomimetic devices. Our progress in the development of responsive polymer-based molecular devices is be discussed with examples of vesicles of controlled size, synthetic muscles and flagella, and microparticles fitted with a jetpack.
Medical Robots: Current Systems and Research Directions
Ryan A. Beasley
Journal of Robotics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/401613
Abstract: First used medically in 1985, robots now make an impact in laparoscopy, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, emergency response, and various other medical disciplines. This paper provides a review of medical robot history and surveys the capabilities of current medical robot systems, primarily focusing on commercially available systems while covering a few prominent research projects. By examining robotic systems across time and disciplines, trends are discernible that imply future capabilities of medical robots, for example, increased usage of intraoperative images, improved robot arm design, and haptic feedback to guide the surgeon. 1. Introduction Medical robotics is causing a paradigm shift in therapy. The most widespread surgical robot, Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci system, has been discussed in over 4,000 peer-reviewed publications, was cleared by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for multiple categories of operations, and was used in 80% of radical prostatectomies performed in the U.S. for 2008, just nine years after the system went on the market [1–3]. The rapid growth in medical robotics is driven by a combination of technological improvements (motors, materials, and control theory), advances in medical imaging (higher resolutions, magnetic resonance imaging, and 3D ultrasound), and an increase in surgeon/patient acceptance of both laparoscopic procedures and robotic assistance. New uses for medical robots are created regularly, as in the initial stages of any technology-driven revolution. In 1979, the Robot Institute of America, an industrial trade group, defined a robot as “a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or other specialized devices through various programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks.” Such a definition leaves out tools with a single task (e.g., stapler), anything that cannot move (e.g., image analysis algorithms), and nonprogrammable mechanisms (e.g., purely manual laparoscopic tools). As a result, robots are generally indicated for tasks requiring programmable motions, particularly where those motions should be quick, strong, precise, accurate, untiring, and/or via complex articulations. The downsides generally include high expense, space needs, and extensive user training requirements. The greatest impact of medical robots has been in surgeries, both radiosurgery and tissue manipulation in the operating room, which are improved by precise and accurate motions of the necessary tools. Through robot assistance, surgical outcomes can be improved,
The Foundherentist View of Justification by Experience
James A. Ryan
Principia : an International Journal of Epistemology , 2000,
Abstract: I show that Susan Haack's foundherentist theory of justification accounts for the role of experience in the creation of justification (a role which has seemed mysterious since experience is not a proposition and therefore cannot, seemingly, support any propos/non). Experience causes one to be justified in believing by causing certain beliefs — the truth of which is necessary to one's being justified — to be true This is revealed when we notice that, as foundherentism holds, no belief is basic in the foundationalist sense, while all beliefs derive their justification from experience, contrary to coherentism
IN THE MUSEUM
A.J. Ryan
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/52-0-57
Abstract: With the help of a generous donation from Miss Joan Law, the Museum of Classical Archaeology has recently acquired a small Roman bronze ithyphallic herm of Pan holding a pedum or shepherd’s crook (Figs. 1 & 2) from the 1st or 2nd century CE. 1 The bottom-most part of the base has broken off, but the object is otherwise in excellent condition with slight patination. The base is rectangular up to the waist. The buttocks are not sculpted but simply indicated by a single incised line. From the waist up the details, such as the musculature, face and hair, are very finely rendered. The figure arches his back and raises his right hand to his forehead while his left hand supports a pedum. He is bearded with short unkempt hair and visible horns.
IN THE MUSEUM
A.j. Ryan
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/49-0-92
Abstract: Two Egyptian artefacts from the first millennium BC have recently been acquired by the Museum of Classical Archaeology at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, courtesy of a kind donation by Miss Joan Law. At a time when academia in South Africa is placing considerable emphasis on African-oriented scholarship, it is appropriate that the museum has on display a large selection of small Egyptian artefacts dating from as early as the 4th millennium BC. These items are of particular interest for teaching as they reflect a variety of different aspects of Egyptian life.
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