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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 837 matches for " Robyn Cant "
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Public Health Nutrition: The Accord of Dietitian Providers in Managing Medicare Chronic Care Outpatients in Australia
Robyn P. Cant
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph7041841
Abstract: Medicare Australia: Chronic Disease Management program subsidizes allied health consultations for eligible outpatients with chronic disease or complex needs. In an evaluation study, private practice dietitians (n = 9) were interviewed to explore their patient management strategies including consultation time-allocation and fees. Time allocation was fee-based. Short first consultations were seen as meeting patients’ needs for low-cost services but were regarded by dietitians as ineffective, however longer initial consultations increased cost to patients. No strategy in use was optimal. There is a need for change in Medicare policy to meet the needs of both dietitians and patients in achieving the behaviour change goals of patients.
The Value of Peer Learning in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Systematic Review
Robyn Stone,Simon Cooper,Robyn Cant
ISRN Nursing , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/930901
Abstract:
The Value of Peer Learning in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Systematic Review
Robyn Stone,Simon Cooper,Robyn Cant
ISRN Nursing , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/930901
Abstract: The study examined various methods of peer learning and their effectiveness in undergraduate nursing education. Using a specifically developed search strategy, healthcare databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles, with studies involving peer learning and students in undergraduate general nursing courses (in both clinical and theoretical settings) being included. The studies were published in English between 2001 and 2010. Both study selection and quality analysis were undertaken independently by two researchers using published guidelines and data was thematically analyzed to answer the research questions. Eighteen studies comprising various research methods were included. The variety of terms used for peer learning and variations between study designs and assessment measures affected the reliability of the study. The outcome measures showing improvement in either an objective effect or subjective assessment were considered a positive result with sixteen studies demonstrating positive aspects to peer learning including increased confidence, competence, and a decrease in anxiety. We conclude that peer learning is a rapidly developing aspect of nursing education which has been shown to develop students’ skills in communication, critical thinking, and self-confidence. Peer learning was shown to be as effective as the conventional classroom lecture method in teaching undergraduate nursing students. 1. Introduction Nursing education studies have often focused on traditional teaching methods such as classroom lecture learning, a behaviourism-based teaching method based on passive learning [1]. More effective student-centric learning methods are now being utilized to encourage active student participation and creative thinking [2–4]. One of these methods is peer learning, in which peers learn from one another, involving active student participation and where the student takes responsibility for their learning. Despite being used for many years, one of the barriers to advancement of peer learning is a lack of consistency in its definition [5]. It is known by different interchangeable titles such as “cooperative learning,” “mentoring,” “peer review learning,” “peer coaching,” “peer mentoring,” “problem-based learning,” and “team learning.” Peer learning has been used in education to address critical thinking, psychomotor skills, cognitive development, clinical skills, and academic gains [6–9]. One type of peer learning is problem-based learning (PBL) which is characterized by students learning from each other and from independently sourced
Capturing the Data: Nutrition Risk Screening of Adults in Hospital
Elizabeth Frew,Robyn Cant,Jennifer Sequeira
Nutrients , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/nu2040438
Abstract: This study aims to explore limitations with the Malnutrition Screening Tool in identifying malnutrition risk, in a cohort of 3,033 adult Australian medical and surgical hospital inpatients. Seventy-two percent of patients were screened; illness and medical care limited access to others. Malnutrition risk (16.5%; n = 501) was found in all age groups with a trend to higher risk in medical wards; 10% (n = 300) of patients with communication barriers were excluded. Systematic screening increased dietitians’ referrals by 39%. Further research is required to enable screening of all patients, including those with communication issues with an easy to use valid tool.
Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures
Simon Cooper, Ruth Endacott, Robyn Cant
Open Access Emergency Medicine , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S6693
Abstract: suring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures Review (6165) Total Article Views Authors: Simon Cooper, Ruth Endacott, Robyn Cant Published Date January 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 7 - 16 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S6693 Simon Cooper1, Ruth Endacott2, Robyn Cant1 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth UK Aim: To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care. Background: Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures. Methods: Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance. Results: A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills. Conclusion: A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care.
Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures
Simon Cooper,Ruth Endacott,Robyn Cant
Open Access Emergency Medicine , 2010,
Abstract: Simon Cooper1, Ruth Endacott2, Robyn Cant11School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth UKAim: To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care.Background: Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures.Methods: Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance.Results: A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills.Conclusion: A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care.Keywords: non-technical skills, teamwork, medical emergency, standards
CuradermBEC5 for Skin Cancers, Is It? An Overview  [PDF]
Tania Robyn Chase
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2011.25099
Abstract: Skin cancer incidence is increasing at alarming rates and is considered by some as an epidemic. Its incidence is higher than all other cancers combined. The developments of new treatments have not parallelled the increased incidences of this disease. A variety of treatments are available with differing outcomes. More recently a novel topical treatment, consisting of the antineoplastic compounds solasodine rhamnosyl glycosides, solamargine and solasonine, which are derived from plant material, has been described that claims to have many advantages over the currently used skin cancer therapies. This review investigates such claims.
The Impact of Sincerity of Terrorists on Committing Terrorist Activities in Turkey  [PDF]
Ahmet Turer, Robyn Diehl McDougle
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2015.39034
Abstract: Research Summary: This study explores the impact of sincerity of terrorists on committing terrorist activities in Turkey. One of the researchers is a Chief of Police in Turkey and has worked in the Anti-terror Department for a considerable part of his professional career. His professional experience has shown that the more sincere a terrorist is the more violent or heedless the terrorist activity is. Thus this research academically and statistically examines this observation and finds that sincerity affects the level of violence. Attachment and adherence to the terrorist organization turn even the characteristically non-violent people into blood seeking terrorists. Policy Implications: Terrorism is still one of the major challenges that the contemporary world faces today. Governments, policy makers, and other stakeholders have great difficulty identifying effective legal mechanisms for fighting terrorism, mainly because of uncertainties regarding both the targets and offenders of terrorist acts. The current study suggests two types of policy implementations. The first is to improve socioeconomic conditions so that people will be less vulnerable to terrorist recruitment, a tactic that requires the identification of risk groups. The second is to detect terrorists and their networks, a tactic that requires the use of different types of intelligence and preventive interventions in the locations that terrorists primarily use for recruitment. The former implementation is a long-term and large-scale project, whereas the latter one is a short-term, small-scale project that appears to be more promising. The two are, however, interrelated. Simply implementing the second tactic could prevent terrorism, but in the absence of the first tactic, terrorist groups will likely find other fertile ground in which to flourish.
Developing an explanatory model for the process of online radicalisation and terrorism
Robyn Torok
Security Informatics , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/2190-8532-2-6
Abstract: While the use of the internet and social media as a tool for extremists and terrorists has been well documented, understanding the mechanisms at work has been much more elusive. This paper begins with a grounded theory approach guided by a new theoretical approach to power that utilizes both terrorism cases and extremist social media groups to develop an explanatory model of radicalization. Preliminary hypotheses are developed, explored and refined in order to develop a comprehensive model which is then presented. This model utilizes and applies concepts from social theorist Michel Foucault, including the use of discourse and networked power relations in order to normalize and modify thoughts and behaviors. The internet is conceptualized as a type of institution in which this framework of power operates and seeks to recruit and radicalize. Overall, findings suggest that the explanatory model presented is a well suited, yet still incomplete in explaining the process of online radicalization.
Health care workers' willingness to participate in and pay for smoking cessation services: Results from a hospital survey
Sachs Robyn
Tobacco Induced Diseases , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1617-9625-3-24
Abstract:
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