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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5119 matches for " Rita Kusriastuti "
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SITUASI VEKTOR DEMAM BERDARAH SAAT KEJADIAN LUAR BIASA (KLB) DI KECAMATAN PASARREBO, JAKARTA TIMUR
M. Hasyimi,Supratman Sukowati,Rita Kusriastuti,Enny Muchlastriningsih
Media of Health Research and Development , 2012,
Abstract: Kejadian luar biasa (KLB) penyakit Demam berdarah dengue (DBD) sering terjadi sejak dilaporkan tahun 1968. Pemberantasannya dengan penemuan penderita, pengobatan dan pengendalian vektor. Karena obat dan vaksin belum ditemukan maka sampai saat ini pemberantasan dan pencegahannya masih mengandalkan pada pengendalian vektor. Tujuan dari penelitian vektor ini adalah untuk mendapatkan informasi tentang habitat perkembangbiakan, kepadatan larva dan nyamuk penular DBD pada waktu terjadi KLB serta tipe virus yang dikandung vektornya. Penelitian dilakukan di Kecamatan Pasar Rebo, Jakarta Timur selama tiga bulan yaitu Juni sampai dengan Agustus 2003. Penelitian entomologi dilakukan merujuk kepada alamat penderita rawat inap yang bertempat tinggal di Kecamatan Pasar Rebo. Diagnosa penderita dilakukan dengan uji Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) terhadap 24 akut konvalesen sera penderita yang diambil dari Rumah Sakit Pasar Rebo. Basil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa index larva sebagai berikut House index (HI) 22,6%; Container index (Cl) 11,4% dan Breuteau index (Bl) 30,3. Kontainer yang positif larva yang berada di dalam rumah 12, 7% dari 387 kontainer. Sementara yang berada di luar rumah 3,1% dari 65 kontainer. Angka bebas jentik (ABJ) di daerah KLB kurang dari 95%. Hasil uji HI sera penderita menunjukkan 70,8% dari pasangan sera yang diperiksa, terinfeksi oleh virus dengue.
Indonesia: An Emerging Market Economy Beset by Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)
Melody Tan,Rita Kusriastuti ,Lorenzo Savioli ,Peter J. Hotez
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002449
Abstract:
Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Endemicity in Indonesia in 2010
Iqbal R. F. Elyazar, Peter W. Gething, Anand P. Patil, Hanifah Rogayah, Rita Kusriastuti, Desak M. Wismarini, Siti N. Tarmizi, J. Kevin Baird, Simon I. Hay
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021315
Abstract: Background Malaria control programs require a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of infection risk to efficiently allocate resources. We used model based geostatistics (MBG) techniques to generate a contemporary map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria risk in Indonesia in 2010. Methods Plasmodium falciparum Annual Parasite Incidence (PfAPI) data (2006–2008) were used to map limits of P. falciparum transmission. A total of 2,581 community blood surveys of P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) were identified (1985–2009). After quality control, 2,516 were included into a national database of age-standardized 2–10 year old PfPR data (PfPR2–10) for endemicity mapping. A Bayesian MBG procedure was used to create a predicted surface of PfPR2–10 endemicity with uncertainty estimates. Population at risk estimates were derived with reference to a 2010 human population count surface. Results We estimate 132.8 million people in Indonesia, lived at risk of P. falciparum transmission in 2010. Of these, 70.3% inhabited areas of unstable transmission and 29.7% in stable transmission. Among those exposed to stable risk, the vast majority were at low risk (93.39%) with the reminder at intermediate (6.6%) and high risk (0.01%). More people in western Indonesia lived in unstable rather than stable transmission zones. In contrast, fewer people in eastern Indonesia lived in unstable versus stable transmission areas. Conclusion While further feasibility assessments will be required, the immediate prospects for sustained control are good across much of the archipelago and medium term plans to transition to the pre-elimination phase are not unrealistic for P. falciparum. Endemicity in areas of Papua will clearly present the greatest challenge. This P. falciparum endemicity map allows malaria control agencies and their partners to comprehensively assess the region-specific prospects for reaching pre-elimination, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of future strategies against this 2010 baseline and ultimately improve their evidence-based malaria control strategies.
Plasmodium vivax Malaria Endemicity in Indonesia in 2010
Iqbal R. F. Elyazar, Peter W. Gething, Anand P. Patil, Hanifah Rogayah, Elvieda Sariwati, Niken W. Palupi, Siti N. Tarmizi, Rita Kusriastuti, J. Kevin Baird, Simon I. Hay
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037325
Abstract: Background Plasmodium vivax imposes substantial morbidity and mortality burdens in endemic zones. Detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of this parasite is needed to combat it. We used model based geostatistics (MBG) techniques to generate a contemporary map of risk of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Indonesia in 2010. Methods Plasmodium vivax Annual Parasite Incidence data (2006–2008) and temperature masks were used to map P. vivax transmission limits. A total of 4,658 community surveys of P. vivax parasite rate (PvPR) were identified (1985–2010) for mapping quantitative estimates of contemporary endemicity within those limits. After error-checking a total of 4,457 points were included into a national database of age-standardized 1–99 year old PvPR data. A Bayesian MBG procedure created a predicted PvPR1–99 endemicity surface with uncertainty estimates. Population at risk estimates were derived with reference to a 2010 human population surface. Results We estimated 129.6 million people in Indonesia lived at risk of P. vivax transmission in 2010. Among these, 79.3% inhabited unstable transmission areas and 20.7% resided in stable transmission areas. In western Indonesia, the predicted P. vivax prevalence was uniformly low. Over 70% of the population at risk in this region lived on Java and Bali islands, where little malaria transmission occurs. High predicted prevalence areas were observed in the Lesser Sundas, Maluku and Papua. In general, prediction uncertainty was relatively low in the west and high in the east. Conclusion Most Indonesians living with endemic P. vivax experience relatively low risk of infection. However, blood surveys for this parasite are likely relatively insensitive and certainly do not detect the dormant liver stage reservoir of infection. The prospects for P. vivax elimination would be improved with deeper understanding of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) distribution, anti-relapse therapy practices and manageability of P. vivax importation risk, especially in Java and Bali.
Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades
Finn Andersen, Nick M Douglas, Dorina Bustos, Gawrie Galappaththy, Gao Qi, Michelle S Hsiang, Rita Kusriastuti, Kamini Mendis, George Taleo, Maxine Whittaker, Ric N Price, Lorenz von Seidlein
Malaria Journal , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-10-131
Abstract: A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 1990 to December 2009 in PubMed/MEDLINE using terms for malaria and 11 target countries (Bhutan, China, North Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vanuatu). The references were collated and categorized according to subject, Plasmodium species, and whether they contained original or derivative data.2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2009 related to malaria in the target countries. The annual output of malaria-related papers increased linearly whereas the overall biomedical output from these countries grew exponentially. The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741) of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p < 0.001) in 2009. Thailand had the highest absolute output of malaria-related papers (n = 1211), followed by China (n = 609) and Indonesia (n = 346). Solomon Islands and Vanuatu had lower absolute numbers of publications, but both countries had the highest number of publications per capita (1.3 and 2.5 papers/1,000 population). The largest percentage of papers concerned the epidemiology and control of malaria (53%) followed by studies of drugs and drug resistance (47%). There was an increase in the proportion of articles relating to epidemiology, entomology, biology, molecular biology, pathophysiology and diagnostics from the first to the second decade, whereas the percentage of papers on drugs, clinical aspects of malaria, immunology, and social sciences decreased.The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing. The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount. In addition the elimination of malaria will require operational research to implement and scale up interventions.Research and development play a major role in many enterprises. A
Contrasting Transmission Dynamics of Co-endemic Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: Implications for Malaria Control and Elimination
Rintis Noviyanti?,Farah Coutrier?,Retno A. S. Utami?,Hidayat Trimarsanto?,Yusrifar K. Tirta?,Leily Trianty?,Andreas Kusuma?,Inge Sutanto?,Ayleen Kosasih?,Rita Kusriastuti
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2015, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003739
Abstract: Background Outside of Africa, P. falciparum and P. vivax usually coexist. In such co-endemic regions, successful malaria control programs have a greater impact on reducing falciparum malaria, resulting in P. vivax becoming the predominant species of infection. Adding to the challenges of elimination, the dormant liver stage complicates efforts to monitor the impact of ongoing interventions against P. vivax. We investigated molecular approaches to inform the respective transmission dynamics of P. falciparum and P. vivax and how these could help to prioritize public health interventions. Methodology/ Principal Findings Genotype data generated at 8 and 9 microsatellite loci were analysed in 168 P. falciparum and 166 P. vivax isolates, respectively, from four co-endemic sites in Indonesia (Bangka, Kalimantan, Sumba and West Timor). Measures of diversity, linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population structure were used to gauge the transmission dynamics of each species in each setting. Marked differences were observed in the diversity and population structure of P. vivax versus P. falciparum. In Bangka, Kalimantan and Timor, P. falciparum diversity was low, and LD patterns were consistent with unstable, epidemic transmission, amenable to targeted intervention. In contrast, P. vivax diversity was higher and transmission appeared more stable. Population differentiation was lower in P. vivax versus P. falciparum, suggesting that the hypnozoite reservoir might play an important role in sustaining local transmission and facilitating the spread of P. vivax infections in different endemic settings. P. vivax polyclonality varied with local endemicity, demonstrating potential utility in informing on transmission intensity in this species. Conclusions/ Significance Molecular approaches can provide important information on malaria transmission that is not readily available from traditional epidemiological measures. Elucidation of the transmission dynamics circulating in a given setting will have a major role in prioritising malaria control strategies, particularly against the relatively neglected non-falciparum species.
Avian Influenza H5N1 Transmission in Households, Indonesia
Tjandra Y. Aditama, Gina Samaan, Rita Kusriastuti, Ondri Dwi Sampurno, Wilfried Purba, Misriyah, Hari Santoso, Arie Bratasena, Anas Maruf, Elvieda Sariwati, Vivi Setiawaty, Kathryn Glass, Kamalini Lokuge, Paul M. Kelly, I. Nyoman Kandun
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0029971
Abstract: Background Disease transmission patterns are needed to inform public health interventions, but remain largely unknown for avian influenza H5N1 virus infections. A recent study on the 139 outbreaks detected in Indonesia between 2005 and 2009 found that the type of exposure to sources of H5N1 virus for both the index case and their household members impacted the risk of additional cases in the household. This study describes the disease transmission patterns in those outbreak households. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared cases (n = 177) and contacts (n = 496) in the 113 sporadic and 26 cluster outbreaks detected between July 2005 and July 2009 to estimate attack rates and disease intervals. We used final size household models to fit transmission parameters to data on household size, cases and blood-related household contacts to assess the relative contribution of zoonotic and human-to-human transmission of the virus, as well as the reproduction number for human virus transmission. The overall household attack rate was 18.3% and secondary attack rate was 5.5%. Secondary attack rate remained stable as household size increased. The mean interval between onset of subsequent cases in outbreaks was 5.6 days. The transmission model found that human transmission was very rare, with a reproduction number between 0.1 and 0.25, and the upper confidence bounds below 0.4. Transmission model fit was best when the denominator population was restricted to blood-related household contacts of index cases. Conclusions/Significance The study only found strong support for human transmission of the virus when a single large cluster was included in the transmission model. The reproduction number was well below the threshold for sustained transmission. This study provides baseline information on the transmission dynamics for the current zoonotic virus and can be used to detect and define signatures of a virus with increasing capacity for human-to-human transmission.
Textile dyeing industry an environmental hazard  [PDF]
Rita Kant
Natural Science (NS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2012.41004
Abstract: Color is the main attraction of any fabric. No matter how excellent its constitution, if unsuitably colored it is bound to be a failure as a commercial fabric. Manufacture and use of synthetic dyes for fabric dyeing has therefore become a massive industry today. In fact the art of applying color to fabric has been known to mankind since 3500 BC. WH Perkins in 1856 discovered the use of synthetic dyes. Synthetic dyes have provided a wide range of colorfast, bright hues. However their toxic nature has become a cause of grave concern to environmentalists. Use of synthetic dyes has an adverse effect on all forms of life. Presence of sulphur, naphthol, vat dyes, nitrates, acetic acid, soaps, enzymes chromium compounds and heavy metals like copper, arsenic, lead, cad- mium, mercury, nickel, and cobalt and certain auxiliary chemicals all collectively make the textile effluent highly toxic. Other harmful chemicals present in the water may be formaldehyde based dye fixing agents, chlorinated stain removers, hydro carbon based softeners, non bio degradable dyeing chemicals. These organic materials react with many disinfectants especially chlorine and form by products (DBP’S) that are often carcinogenic and therefore undesirable. Many of these show allergic reactions. The colloidal matter present along with colors and oily scum increases the turbidity, gives the water a bad appearance and foul smell and prevents the penetration of sunlight necessary for the process of photosynthesis. This in turn interferes with the Oxygen transfer mechanism at air water interface which in turn interferes with marine life and self purification process of water. This effluent if allowed to flow in the fields’ clogs the pores of the soil resulting in loss of soil productivity. If allowed to flow in drains and rivers it effects the quality of drinking water in hand pumps making it unfit for human consumption. It is important to remove these pollutants from the waste waters before their final disposal.
Adsorption of Dye Eosin from an Aqueous Solution on two Different Samples of Activated Carbon by Static Batch Method  [PDF]
Rita Kant
Journal of Water Resource and Protection (JWARP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2012.42011
Abstract: Removal of dye Eosin on two different samples of activated carbon by static batch method was studied. Experimental data on optical density of blank solutions of different concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L and optical density of solutions after adsorption on activated carbon samples were taken and analyzed. Calibration curves were plotted and the amount of dye adsorbed was calculated. The data was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for two different carbon samples and different concentration values. Constants were calculated from the slope and intercept values of the isotherms. Coefficient of correlation R2 and Standard Deviation SD were also noted. The data fitted well to the iso- therms. It was observed that adsorption decreased with increase in ppm concentrations. Carbon sample C2 showed higher potential to adsorb the dye Eosin as compared to carbon sample C1. Further Carbon sample C2 showed better adsorption in acidic pH as compared to in alkaline pH. From the analysis of the data it is shown that C2 sample has a good capacity to remove the textile dye from the residue water.
Adsorption of yellow dye: Acid yellow RR from its aqueous solution using two different samples of activated carbon by static batch method  [PDF]
Kant Rita
Natural Science (NS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2012.42016
Abstract: Removal of dye Acid Yellow RR, using two different samples of activated carbon by static batch method was studied. Experimental data on optical density of blank solutions of different concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L and optical density of solutions after adsorption on activated carbon samples were taken and analyzed. Calibration curves were plotted and the amount of dye qe adsorbed was calculated. The data was fitted to Polynomial, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for two different carbon samples and different concentration and pH values. Constants were calculated from the slope and intercept values of the isotherms. Coefficient of correlation R2 and Standard Deviation SD were also noted. The data fitted well to the isotherms. Carbon sample C1 showed higher potential to adsorb the yellow dye. Adsorption was higher at lower concentrations of the solution. Carbon sample C2 showed better adsorption in acidic pH as com- pared to in alkaline pH. From the analysis of the data it is shown that C2 sample has a good capacity to remove the textile dye from the residue water although sample C1 was still better.
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