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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 217428 matches for " Richard P Phelps "
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The Effect of Testing on Achievement: Meta-Analyses and Research Summary, 1910–2010. Source List, Effect Sizes, and References for Survey Studies
Richard P. Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2011,
Abstract: The study summarizes the research literature on the effect of testing on student achievement, which comprises several hundred studies conducted from the early 20th century to the present day. Only survey studies, however, are included here (N studies = 247; N effects = 813; total respondent population . 700,000). Moreover, the surveys summarized here are limited to North America from the year 1958–2008. Surveys measure perceptions of effects—either through public opinion polls or surveys of groups selected within program evaluations. The mean effect size (for the perception that testing has a positive effect on achievement) exceeds +1.0, a very large effect. Effect sizes are relatively weaker, however, for situations in which one group is held accountable for the performance of another—holding either teachers or schools accountable for student scores.
Educators Cheating on Tests Is Nothing New; Doing Something About It Would Be
Richard P. Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2011,
Abstract: no abstract
The effect of testing on student achievement: 1910-2010
Richard P Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2012,
Abstract: no abstract
L'effet de tests standardises sur les resultats scolaires des eleves : 1910--2010
Richard P Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2012,
Abstract: no abstract
The School-Test Publisher Complex
Richard P Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2012,
Abstract: no abstract
Worse than Plagiarism? Firstness Claims and Dismissive Reviews (slide show)
Richard P. Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2009,
Abstract: no abstract
The Source of Lake Wobegon
Richard P. Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2005,
Abstract: John J. Cannell's late 1980's “Lake Wobegon” reports suggested widespread deliberate educator manipulation of norm-referenced standardized test (NRT) administrations and results, resulting in artificial test score gains. The Cannell studies have been referenced in education research since, but as evidence that high stakes (and not cheating or lax security) cause test score inflation. This article examines that research and Cannell's data for evidence that high stakes cause test score inflation. No such evidence is found.Indeed, the evidence indicates that, if anything, the absence of high stakes is associated with artificial test score gains. The variable most highly correlated with test score inflation is general performance on achievement tests, with traditionally low-performing states exhibiting more test score inflation—on low-stakes norm-referenced tests—than traditionally high-performing states, regardless of whether or not a state also maintains a high-stakes testing program. The unsupported high-stakes-cause-test-score-inflation hypothesis seems to derive from the surreptitious substitution of an antiquated definition of the term “high stakes” and a few studies afflicted with left-out-variable bias. The source of test-score inflation is lax test security, regardless the stakes of the assessment.
The achievement benefits of standardized testing
Richard P. Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2006,
Abstract: no abstract
The Rot Spreads Worldwide: OECD - Taken In and Taking Sides
Richard P Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2013,
Abstract: no abstract
The Effect of Testing on Achievement: Meta-Analyses and Research Summary, 1910–2010. Source List, Effect Sizes, and References for Quantitative Studies
Richard P. Phelps
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2011,
Abstract: The study summarizes the research literature on the effect of testing on student achievement, which comprises several hundred studies conducted from the early 20th century to the present day. Only quantitative studies are listed here (N studies = 177; N effects = 640). Mean effect sizes range from a moderate d 0.55 to a fairly large d 0.88 depending on the way effects are aggregated or effect sizes are adjusted for study artifacts. Testing with feedback produces the strongest positive effect on achievement. Adding stakes or testing with greater frequency also strongly and positively affects achievement. The evidence from a century’s worth of quantitative studies shows the effect of testing on achievement to be moderately to strongly positive.Smaller-scale studies, however, tend to produce stronger effects than do large-scale studies. Those who judge the effect of testing on achievement exclusively from large-sample multivariate studies deprive themselves of the most focused, clear, and precise evidence. Some prominent researchers in economics and education, for example, have claimed that no studies of “test-based accountability” had been conducted before theirs in the early 2000s. But, this list includes 24 studies completed before 2000 whose primary focus was to measure the effect of “test-based accountability.” A few dozen more pre-2000 studies also measured the effect of test-based accountability although such was not their primary focus. Include qualitative and program evaluation studies of test-based accountability, and the count of pre-2000 studies rises into the hundreds.
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