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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 200922 matches for " Rex P. Bringula "
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School Choice of Computing Students: A Comparative Perspective from Two Universities  [PDF]
Rex P. Bringula, Ma. Ymelda C. Batalla, Shirley D. Moraga, Lester Dave R. Ochengco, Kyle N. Ohagan, Rolando R. Lansigan
Creative Education (CE) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.326161
Abstract: This descriptive study utilized a validated questionnaire to determine the profile of two sets of students and their level of consideration in deciding to enroll in their University. It also determined whether their level of consideration in deciding to enroll in their University significantly differed from each other. It was found out that most of the University of the East (UE) and National University (NU) respondents were male respondents taking up Information Technology. They did not have a home province, lived in Manila and Quezon City, lived in family-owned houses, belonged to a family with five family members, and travelled at least an hour in going to school through jeepneys. On the other hand, they were different in terms of family monthly income (most of the UE respondents belonged to a family with a higher family monthly income) and number of family members who studied in the University (most of the NU respondents had at least one member who studied in the same University). It was also noted that more than a quarter of NU respondents lived near their school. UE and NU respondents agreed that they considered nine and five, respectively, of the eleven institutional image indicators in deciding to enroll in the University. UE respondents had the highest consideration on Admission Process and Course Offering while NU respondents had the highest consideration on Scholarships and Grants. Test of difference between means revealed that the level of considerations of the respondents on the institutional image indicators significantly differed in nine out of the eleven indicators. Thus, the null hypothesis stating that there is no significant difference in the level of consideration of the respondents in deciding to enroll in the two Universities in terms of institutional image indicators is partially rejected. Conclusions, recommendations, and limitations of the study were also discussed.
PATTERN OF INTERNET USAGE IN CYBER CAFéS IN MANILA: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY
Rex P. Bringula,Jenmart Bonifacio,Ana Natanauan,Mikael Manuel
International Journal of Cyber Society and Education , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7903/ijcse.1102
Abstract: This study determined the profile and pattern of Internet usage of respondents in cyber cafés in Manila. The study employed an exploratory-descriptive design in which a validated descriptive-survey form was used as the research instrument. Forty-seven cyber cafés in 14 districts in the City of Manila were randomly selected. There were 545 respondents. It was found that most of the respondents were Manila settlers (f = 368, 70%), students (f = 382, 73%), pursuing or had attained a college degree (f = 374, 72%), male (f = 356, 68%), young (19 and below) (f = 314, 60%), Roman Catholic (f = 423, 81%), single (f = 470, 90%), had a computer at home (f = 269, 51%), belonged to the middle-income class (f = 334, 64%), and used the Internet in the afternoon (f = 274, 50.3%, 2 = 113.98, DF = 2, p < 0.01) once to twice a week (f = 193, 36.9%, 2 = 90.04, DF = 3, p < 0.01). Frequency of visit of Internet users was not equally distributed during the week and Internet users showed the tendency to visit cyber cafés at a particular time of the day when grouped according to profile. The first hypothesis stated that frequency of visiting a cyber café would not be equally distributed during the week when grouped according to profile was accepted. The second hypothesis, which stated that respondents would not show a tendency to use the internet in a cyber café at a particular time of the day was rejected. The study also discusses the limitations and implications of the findings.
Computer Self-efficacy and Its Relationship with Web Portal Usage: Evidence from the University of the East
Rex P. Bringula, Julius Jan Sarmiento, Roselle Basa
International Journal of Computing Sciences Research , DOI: 10.25147/ijcsr.2017.001.1.02
Abstract: Purpose – The University of the East Web Portal is an academic, web-based system that provides educational electronic materials and e-learning services. To fully optimize its usage, it is imperative to determine the factors that relate to its usage. Thus, this study, to determine the computer self-efficacy of the faculty members of the University of the East and its relationship with their web portal usage, was conceived. Method – Using a validated questionnaire, the profile of the respondents, their computer self-efficacy, and web portal usage were gathered. Results – Data showed that the respondents were relatively young (M = 40 years old), majority had master’s degree (f = 85, 72%), most had been using the web portal for four semesters (f = 60, 51%), and the large part were intermediate web portal users (f = 69, 59%). They were highly skilled in using the computer (M = 4.29) and skilled in using the Internet (M = 4.28). E-learning services (M = 3.29) and online library resources (M = 3.12) were only used occasionally. Pearson correlation revealed that age was positively correlated with online library resources (r = 0.267, p < 0.05) and a negative relationship existed between perceived skill level in using the portal and online library resources usage (r = -0.206, p < 0.05). A 2×2 χ2 revealed that the highest educational attainment had a significant relationship with online library resources (χ2 = 5.489, df = 1, p < 0.05). Basic computer (r = 0.196, p < 0.05) and Internet skills (r = 0.303, p < 0.05) were significantly and positively related with e-learning services usage but not with online library resources usage. Research Implication – Other individual factors such as attitudes towards the web portal and anxiety towards using the web portal can be investigated.
Development of a Passive RFID Locator for Laboratory Equipment Monitoring and Inventory System
Jose Randy L. Velayo,Shirley D. Moraga,Ma. Ymelda C. Batalla,Rex P. Bringula
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract:
Predictors of Errors of Novice Java Programmers
Rex Bringula,Geecee Maybelline Manabat,Miguel Angelo Tolentino,Edmon Torres
World Journal of Education , 2012, DOI: 10.5430/wje.v2n1p3
Abstract: This descriptive study determined which of the sources of errors would predict the errors committed by novice Java programmers. Descriptive statistics revealed that the respondents perceived that they committed the identified eighteen errors infrequently. Thought error was perceived to be the main source of error during the laboratory programming exercises. Factor analysis showed that there were five categories for the types of errors committed. Four of them were symbol- or keyword-related errors (Invalid symbols or keywords, Mismatched symbols, Missing symbols, and Excessive symbols) and the fifth one was Naming-related error (Inappropriate naming error). Regression analysis showed that Sensorimotor and Habit errors, together with Knowledge error, were found to predict Mismatched symbols and Missing symbols errors, respectively. Knowledge error was found to be the consistent source of the five types of errors. Thus, the null hypothesis stating that sources of errors do not predict errors committed by novice Java programmers is partially rejected. The implications of the findings were also discussed.
Root-Patterns to Algebrising Partitions  [PDF]
Rex L. Agacy
Advances in Pure Mathematics (APM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/apm.2015.51004
Abstract: The study of the confluences of the roots of a given set of polynomials—root-pattern problem— does not appear to have been considered. We examine the situation, which leads us on to Young tableaux and tableaux representations. This in turn is found to be an aspect of multipartite partitions. We discover, and show, that partitions can be expressed algebraically and can be “differentiated” and “integrated”. We show a complete set of bipartite and tripartite partitions, indicating equivalences for the root-pattern problem, for select pairs and triples. Tables enumerating the number of bipartite and tripartite partitions, for small pairs and triples are given in an appendix.
Keeping Cool: Use of Air Conditioning by Australians with Multiple Sclerosis
Michael P. Summers,Rex D. Simmons,George Verikios
Multiple Sclerosis International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/794310
Abstract: Despite the known difficulties many people with MS have with high ambient temperatures, there are no reported studies of air conditioning use and MS. This study systematically examined air conditioner use by Australians with MS. A short survey was sent to all participants in the Australian MS Longitudinal Study cohort with a response rate of 76% (=2,385). Questions included hours of air-conditioner use, areas cooled, type and age of equipment, and the personal effects of overheating. Air conditioners were used by 81.9% of respondents, with an additional 9.6% who could not afford an air conditioner. Regional and seasonal variation in air conditioning use was reported, with a national annual mean of 1,557 hours running time. 90.7% reported negative effects from overheating including increased fatigue, an increase in other MS symptoms, reduced household and social activities, and reduced work capacity. Households that include people with MS spend between 4 and 12 times more on keeping cool than average Australian households.
Statistical analysis of the precision of the Match method
R. Lehmann, P. von der Gathen, M. Rex,M. Streibel
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) & Discussions (ACPD) , 2005,
Abstract: The Match method quantifies chemical ozone loss in the polar stratosphere. The basic idea consists in calculating the forward trajectory of an air parcel that has been probed by an ozone measurement (e.g., by an ozonesonde or satellite instrument) and finding a second ozone measurement close to this trajectory. Such an event is called a "match". A rate of chemical ozone destruction can be obtained by a statistical analysis of several tens of such match events. Information on the uncertainty of the calculated rate can be inferred from the scatter of the ozone mixing ratio difference (second measurement minus first measurement) associated with individual matches. A standard analysis would assume that the errors of these differences are statistically independent. However, this assumption may be violated because different matches can share a common ozone measurement, so that the errors associated with these match events become statistically dependent. Taking this effect into account, we present an analysis of the uncertainty of the final Match result. It has been applied to Match data from the Arctic winters 1995, 1996, 2000, and 2003. For these ozonesonde Match studies the effect of the error correlation on the uncertainty estimates is rather small: compared to a standard error analysis, the uncertainty estimates increase by 15% on average. However, the effect may be more pronounced for typical satellite Match analyses: for an Antarctic satellite Match study (2003), the uncertainty estimates increase by 60% on average. The analysis showed that the random errors of the ozone measurements and the "net match errors", which result from a displacement of the second ozone measurement of a match from the required position, are of similar magnitude. This demonstrates that the criteria for accepting a match (maximum trajectory duration, match radius, spread of trajectory clusters etc.) ensure that, given the unavoidable ozone-measurement errors, the magnitude of the net match errors is adequate. The estimate of the random errors of the ozonesonde measurements agrees well with laboratory results. Final Revised Paper (PDF, 500 KB) Discussion Paper (ACPD) Special Issue Citation: Lehmann, R., von der Gathen, P., Rex, M., and Streibel, M.: Statistical analysis of the precision of the Match method, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 2713-2727, doi:10.5194/acp-5-2713-2005, 2005. Bibtex EndNote Reference Manager XML
Analysis of results of surgical treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow
Rex Chandrabose,Suresh Kumar P,Srimannarayana Addagalla,Chugh S
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics , 2008,
Abstract: Background: Surgical management of posttraumatic elbow stiffness has been reported with poor outcome following treatment. Sequential release in earlier stages of stiffness yielded much better results. The goal of our study was to assess the outcome in improvement of the range of motion of the elbow after surgical release and to analyze a tailor-made approach according to individual needs to yield good result. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 47 cases of elbow stiffness due to various types of injuries. All the cases were treated with sequential release if there was no progress after adequate supervised conservative management except in unreduced dislocations. All the cases were followed up for a minimum period of 24 months. Overall outcome was rated with the functional scoring system by Mayo Clinic Performance Index. Results: Twenty-five (44.68%) out of 47 patients had excellent results with a mean preoperative range of motion of 33.9° and postoperative range of motion of 105° with net gain in range of motion of 71.1° (′ t ′ test value is 19.27, P < 0.01). None of the patients had elbow instability. Patients not having heterotopic ossification, who underwent surgery from three to six months post injury had a mean gain of 73.5°. In patients who waited for more than six months had mean gain of 66.8°. However, the results in cases having heterotopic ossification followed a slightly different pattern. In cases where release was performed from three months to six months had mean gain of 77.5°. Cases in which release was performed after six months had gain of 57.1°. Conclusions: In cases of posttraumatic elbow stiffness after a failed initial conservative treatment, early arthrolysis with sequential surgical soft tissue release yields good result than delayed surgery.
Statistical analysis of the precision of the Match method
R. Lehmann,P. von der Gathen,M. Rex,M. Streibel
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions , 2005,
Abstract: The Match method quantifies chemical ozone loss in the polar stratosphere. The basic idea consists in calculating the forward trajectory of an air parcel that has been probed by an ozone measurement (e.g., by an ozone sonde or satellite) and finding a second ozone measurement close to this trajectory. Such an event is called a ''match''. A rate of chemical ozone destruction can be obtained by a statistical analysis of several tens of such match events. Information on the uncertainty of the calculated rate can be inferred from the scatter of the ozone mixing ratio difference (second measurement minus first measurement) associated with individual matches. A standard analysis would assume that the errors of these differences are statistically independent. However, this assumption may be violated because different matches can share a common ozone measurement, so that the errors associated with these match events become statistically dependent. Taking this effect into account, we present an analysis of the uncertainty of the final Match result. It has been applied to Match data from the Arctic winters 1995, 1996, 2000, and 2003. For these ozone-sonde Match studies the effect of the error correlation on the uncertainty estimates is rather small: compared to a standard error analysis, the uncertainty estimates increase by 15% on average. However, the effect is more pronounced for typical satellite Match analyses: for an Antarctic satellite Match study (2003), the uncertainty estimates increase by 60% on average.
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