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Exercise prescription for hospitalized people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidities: a synthesis of systematic reviews
Reid WD,Yamabayashi C,Goodridge D,Chung F
International Journal of COPD , 2012,
Abstract: W Darlene Reid,1,2 Cristiane Yamabayashi,1 Donna Goodridge,3 Frank Chung,4 Michael A Hunt,1 Darcy D Marciniuk,5 Dina Brooks,6 Yi-Wen Chen,1 Alison Hoens,1,7 Pat Camp1,21Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 2Institute of Heart and Lung Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 3College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 4Physiotherapy, Burnaby Hospital, Fraser Health, British Columbia, 5Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 6Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 7Providence Health Care, Vancouver, BC, CanadaIntroduction: The prescription of physical activity for hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) can be complicated by the presence of comorbidities. The current research aimed to synthesize the relevant literature on the benefits of exercise for people with multimorbidities who experience an AECOPD, and ask: What are the parameters and outcomes of exercise in AECOPD and in conditions that are common comorbidities as reported by systematic reviews (SRs)?Methods: An SR was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. Nine electronic databases were searched up to July 2011. Articles were included if they (1) described participants with AECOPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or one of eleven common comorbidities, (2) were an SR, (3) examined aerobic training (AT), resistance training (RT), balance training (BT), or a combination thereof, (4) included at least one outcome of fitness, and (5) compared exercise training versus control/sham.Results: This synthesis examined 58 SRs of exercise training in people with AECOPD, COPD, or eleven chronic conditions commonly associated with COPD. Meta-analyses of endurance (aerobic or exercise capacity, 6-minute walk distance – 6MWD) were shown to significantly improve in most conditions (except osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and depression), whereas strength was shown to improve in five of the 13 conditions searched: COPD, older adults, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes. Several studies of different conditions also reported improvements in quality of life, function, and control or prevention outcomes. Meta-analyses also demonstrate that exercise training decreases the risk of mortality in older adults, and those with COPD or ischemic heart disease. The most common types of training were AT and RT. BT and functional training were commonly applied in older adults. The qua
Exercise prescription for hospitalized people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidities: a synthesis of systematic reviews
Reid WD, Yamabayashi C, Goodridge D, Chung F, Hunt MA, Marciniuk DD, Brooks D, Chen YW, Hoens AM, Camp PG
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S29750
Abstract: cise prescription for hospitalized people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidities: a synthesis of systematic reviews Review (5543) Total Article Views Authors: Reid WD, Yamabayashi C, Goodridge D, Chung F, Hunt MA, Marciniuk DD, Brooks D, Chen YW, Hoens AM, Camp PG Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 297 - 320 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S29750 Received: 07 January 2012 Accepted: 17 February 2012 Published: 14 May 2012 W Darlene Reid,1,2 Cristiane Yamabayashi,1 Donna Goodridge,3 Frank Chung,4 Michael A Hunt,1 Darcy D Marciniuk,5 Dina Brooks,6 Yi-Wen Chen,1 Alison M Hoens,1,7 Pat G Camp1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 2Institute of Heart and Lung Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 3College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 4Physiotherapy, Burnaby Hospital, Fraser Health, British Columbia, 5Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 6Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 7Providence Health Care, Vancouver, BC, Canada Introduction: The prescription of physical activity for hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) can be complicated by the presence of comorbidities. The current research aimed to synthesize the relevant literature on the benefits of exercise for people with multimorbidities who experience an AECOPD, and ask: What are the parameters and outcomes of exercise in AECOPD and in conditions that are common comorbidities as reported by systematic reviews (SRs)? Methods: An SR was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. Nine electronic databases were searched up to July 2011. Articles were included if they (1) described participants with AECOPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or one of eleven common comorbidities, (2) were an SR, (3) examined aerobic training (AT), resistance training (RT), balance training (BT), or a combination thereof, (4) included at least one outcome of fitness, and (5) compared exercise training versus control/sham. Results: This synthesis examined 58 SRs of exercise training in people with AECOPD, COPD, or eleven chronic conditions commonly associated with COPD. Meta-analyses of endurance (aerobic or exercise capacity, 6-minute walk distance – 6MWD) were shown to significantly improve in most conditions (except osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and depression), whereas strength was shown to improve in five of the 13 conditions searched: COPD, older adults, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes. Several studies of different conditions also reported improvements in quality of life, function, and control or prevention outcomes. Meta-analyses also demonstrate that exercise training decreases the risk of mortality in older adults, and those with COPD or ischemic heart disease. The most common types of training were AT and RT. BT and
Efficacy and safety of fibrin sealant for tissue adherence in facial rhytidectomy
Spotnitz WD
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S25747
Abstract: acy and safety of fibrin sealant for tissue adherence in facial rhytidectomy Review (1821) Total Article Views Authors: Spotnitz WD Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 43 - 51 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S25747 Received: 11 April 2012 Accepted: 20 April 2012 Published: 24 May 2012 William D Spotnitz The Surgical Therapeutic Advancement Center, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review is to clarify the present use of fibrin sealant in rhyditectomy procedures and help maximize the appropriate and safe application of this material. A set of terms and definitions for hemostats, sealants, and adhesives based on group, category, and class will be employed to highlight the specific capabilities of fibrin sealant. Fibrin sealant has now emerged as an example of maximizing the usefulness of a surgical agent and is the only product with Food and Drug Administration approval in all three groupings: hemostats; sealants; and adhesives. A variety of manufacturers’ fibrin sealant products are available including multiple liquids and one patch. A single liquid product is now specifically indicated for skin flap adherence during rhytidectomy. The unique characteristic of this particular two component fibrin sealant adhesive agent is its slower polymerization rate as a result of a low thrombin concentration which when combined with fibrinogen permits adequate time for manipulation of flaps and tissues prior to final fixation. In addition to its flap adherence and potential space elimination capability, fibrin sealant is also an excellent blood clotting agent and can seal tissues to prevent lymphatic leak or serous fluid accumulation. Thus, it is almost ideally suited to reduce the occurrence of fluid accumulation, hematomas, ecchymoses, and swelling, as well as to possibly eliminate the need for drains following rhytidectomy. A literature review of fibrin sealant in rhytidectomy is included to help define the current state of its clinical use. The author’s recommendations for the best use of this material during facial procedures are also provided.
Efficacy and safety of fibrin sealant for tissue adherence in facial rhytidectomy
Spotnitz WD
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2012,
Abstract: William D SpotnitzThe Surgical Therapeutic Advancement Center, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: The purpose of this review is to clarify the present use of fibrin sealant in rhyditectomy procedures and help maximize the appropriate and safe application of this material. A set of terms and definitions for hemostats, sealants, and adhesives based on group, category, and class will be employed to highlight the specific capabilities of fibrin sealant. Fibrin sealant has now emerged as an example of maximizing the usefulness of a surgical agent and is the only product with Food and Drug Administration approval in all three groupings: hemostats; sealants; and adhesives. A variety of manufacturers’ fibrin sealant products are available including multiple liquids and one patch. A single liquid product is now specifically indicated for skin flap adherence during rhytidectomy. The unique characteristic of this particular two component fibrin sealant adhesive agent is its slower polymerization rate as a result of a low thrombin concentration which when combined with fibrinogen permits adequate time for manipulation of flaps and tissues prior to final fixation. In addition to its flap adherence and potential space elimination capability, fibrin sealant is also an excellent blood clotting agent and can seal tissues to prevent lymphatic leak or serous fluid accumulation. Thus, it is almost ideally suited to reduce the occurrence of fluid accumulation, hematomas, ecchymoses, and swelling, as well as to possibly eliminate the need for drains following rhytidectomy. A literature review of fibrin sealant in rhytidectomy is included to help define the current state of its clinical use. The author’s recommendations for the best use of this material during facial procedures are also provided.Keywords: hemostats, sealants, adhesives, blood, lymph, serous fluid
Time behaviour near to spectral singularities
WD Heiss
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2010-00243-0
Abstract: Spectral singularities such as exceptional points invoke specific physical effects. The present paper focuses upon the time dependent solutions of the Schr\"odinger equation. In a simple model it is demonstrated that - depending on initial conditions - within close proximity of exceptional points the time behaviour of the wave function displays characteristic features such as very fast decay or the opposite, i.e. very long life time. At the exceptional point the wave function typically has a linear term in time besides the usual exponential behaviour.
On the Thermodynamic Limit of the Lipkin Model
WD Heiss
Physics , 2006, DOI: 10.1088/0305-4470/39/32/S10
Abstract: The thermodynamic limit of the Lipkin model is investigated. While the limit turns out to be rather elusive, the analysis gives strong indications that the limit yields two analytically dissociated operators, one for the normal and one for the deformed phase. While the Lipkin Hamiltonian is hermitian and has a second order phase transition in finite dimensions (finite particle number), both properties seem to be destroyed in the thermodynamic limit.
Towards the conservation of the indigenous cattle of KwaZulu-Natal
WD Gertenbach, AA Kars
South African Journal of Animal Science , 1999,
Abstract:
Military Leadership Development: A Model for the SA National Defence Force
WD Erasmus, F Uys
Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies , 2012,
Abstract: The result of this article is an alternative model for leadership character development in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF). The SANDF reflects the racial and cultural diversity of South Africa as a nation. The need for a unifying leadership related mechanism, which will provide for the military milieu in which humane leadership development will flourish, is evident. This statement is based on the premise that no evidence was found that any previous efforts by the SANDF to instil a leadership philosophy or policy as a way of military life was successful. The model also addresses further shortcomings in the current SANDF leadership development model as the selection process of officer candidates needs improvement because political guidance and participation in the development of military leaders are absent. Officer formative training consequently reflects emaciated attention to the development of the character side of leaders, and the SANDF has no military leadership institution to ensure that its leadership development policies and practices are based on sound academic research.
Status epilepticus in the elderly: differential diagnosis and treatment
Mauricio EA,Freeman WD
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2011,
Abstract: Elizabeth Ann Mauricio, William David FreemanMayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USADate of Preparation 28th January 2011 Conflict of interest: None declaredAbstract: Seizures are not an uncommon occurrence in older adults, and the incidence of status epilepticus is much greater in the elderly than in younger populations. Status epilepticus is a neurologic emergency and requires prompt intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality. Treatment involves both supportive care as well as initiation of medications to stop all clinical and electrographic seizure activity. Benzodiazepines are used as first-line agents, followed by antiepileptic drugs when seizures persist. In refractory status epilepticus, urgent neurologic consultation is indicated for the titration of anesthetic agents to a level of appropriate background suppression on EEG. In light of our aging population, physician awareness and competence in the management of status epilepticus is imperative and should be recognized as a growing public health concern.Keywords: status epilepticus, convulsive, generalized, nonconvulsive, refractory, elderly, treatment
A FRAMEWORK FOR GOOD CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING a€“ AN EMPIRICAL STUDY
WD Kearney,HA Kruger
International Journal of Cyber-Security and Digital Forensics , 2013,
Abstract: The importance of applying good governance principles has grown over the past decade and many studies have been performed to investigate the role and impact of such principles. One of the difficulties in the governance arena is to provide sufficient empirical evidence that good corporate governance and good governance of information technology is beneficial. This paper describes a framework, based on a value-focused approach, which is used to identify unique dimensions for evaluation in a large organisation. Following the evaluation a practical phishing experiment was used to show how a learning process can be initiated through security incidents and how organisational learning can be used to focus on the improvement of specific governance areas.
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