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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 463805 matches for " Rebecca A. Poynton "
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Maternal Undernutrition Significantly Impacts Ovarian Follicle Number and Increases Ovarian Oxidative Stress in Adult Rat Offspring
Angelica B. Bernal,Mark H. Vickers,Mark B. Hampton,Rebecca A. Poynton,Deborah M. Sloboda
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0015558
Abstract: We have shown recently that maternal undernutrition (UN) advanced female pubertal onset in a manner that is dependent upon the timing of UN. The long-term consequence of this accelerated puberty on ovarian function is unknown. Recent findings suggest that oxidative stress may be one mechanism whereby early life events impact on later physiological functioning. Therefore, using an established rodent model of maternal UN at critical windows of development, we examined maternal UN-induced changes in offspring ovarian function and determined whether these changes were underpinned by ovarian oxidative stress.
Imaging Modalities for Cervical Spondylotic Stenosis and Myelopathy
C. Green,J. Butler,S. Eustace,A. Poynton,J. M. O'Byrne
Advances in Orthopedics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/908324
Abstract: Cervical spondylosis is a spectrum of pathology presenting as neck pain, radiculopathy, and myelopathy or all in combination. Diagnostic imaging is essential to diagnosis and preoperative planning. We discuss the modalities of imaging in common practice. We examine the use of imaging to differentiate among central, subarticular, and lateral stenosis and in the assessment of myelopathy.
Operative Techniques for Cervical Radiculopathy and Myelopathy
R. G. Kavanagh,J. S. Butler,J. M. O'Byrne,A. R. Poynton
Advances in Orthopedics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/794087
Abstract: Cervical spondylosis is a common problem encountered in modern orthopaedic practice. It is associated with significant patient morbidity related to the consequent radiculopathic and myelopathic symptoms. Operative intervention for this condition is generally indicated if conservative measures fail; however there are some circumstances in which urgent surgical intervention is necessary. Planning any surgical intervention must take into account a number of variables including, but not limited to, the nature, location and extent of the pathology, a history of previous operative interventions, and patient co-morbidities. There are many different surgical options and a multitude of different procedures have been described using both the anterior and posterior approaches to the cervical spine. The use of autograft to achieve cervical fusion is still the gold standard with allograft showing similar results; however fusion techniques are constantly evolving with novel synthetic bone graft substitutes now widely available.
Predicting the start week of respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks using real time weather variables
Nephi A Walton, Mollie R Poynton, Per H Gesteland, Chris Maloney, Catherine Staes, Julio C Facelli
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6947-10-68
Abstract: Na?ve Bayes (NB) classifier models were constructed using weather data from 1985-2008 considering only variables that are available in real time and that could be used to forecast the week in which an RSV outbreak will occur in Salt Lake County, Utah. Outbreak start dates were determined by a panel of experts using 32,509 records with ICD-9 coded RSV and bronchiolitis diagnoses from Intermountain Healthcare hospitals and clinics for the RSV seasons from 1985 to 2008.NB models predicted RSV outbreaks up to 3 weeks in advance with an estimated sensitivity of up to 67% and estimated specificities as high as 94% to 100%. Temperature and wind speed were the best overall predictors, but other weather variables also showed relevance depending on how far in advance the predictions were made. The weather conditions predictive of an RSV outbreak in our study were similar to those that lead to temperature inversions in the Salt Lake Valley.We demonstrate that Na?ve Bayes (NB) classifier models based on weather data available in real time have the potential to be used as effective predictive models. These models may be able to predict the week that an RSV outbreak will occur with clinical relevance. Their clinical usefulness will be field tested during the next five years.Bronchiolitis is a major cause of hospital admissions during the winter and can cause severe hospital overcrowding. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a respiratory virus that can cause severe infection in infants and young children and is the leading cause of bronchiolitis in children under one year of age in the United States [1-4]. RSV outbreaks cause a significant increase in hospital admissions during the winter season [2]. The ability to predict the start date of an RSV outbreak using readily available data may allow for the implementation of management strategies in a more timely, effective, and efficient fashion. Some possible improvements may include: improved staff scheduling, improved rescheduling
Operative Techniques for Cervical Radiculopathy and Myelopathy
R. G. Kavanagh,J. S. Butler,J. M. O'Byrne,A. R. Poynton
Advances in Orthopedics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/794087
Abstract: Cervical spondylosis is a common problem encountered in modern orthopaedic practice. It is associated with significant patient morbidity related to the consequent radiculopathic and myelopathic symptoms. Operative intervention for this condition is generally indicated if conservative measures fail; however there are some circumstances in which urgent surgical intervention is necessary. Planning any surgical intervention must take into account a number of variables including, but not limited to, the nature, location and extent of the pathology, a history of previous operative interventions, and patient co-morbidities. There are many different surgical options and a multitude of different procedures have been described using both the anterior and posterior approaches to the cervical spine. The use of autograft to achieve cervical fusion is still the gold standard with allograft showing similar results; however fusion techniques are constantly evolving with novel synthetic bone graft substitutes now widely available. 1. Introduction Cervical spondylosis is a common problem that is increasing in incidence in our aging population. Presentation is usually with neck pain, cervical radiculopathy, cervical myelopathy, or a combination of these. The pathogenesis of cervical spondylosis is age-related degeneration with loss of disc height and posterior or posterolateral disc herniation. Degenerative changes also result in bulging of the ligamentum flavum which can impinge on the spinal cord posteriorly, osteophyte formation, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which can compress the spinal cord anteriorly [1]. Cervical radiculopathy has an incidence of 83.2 per 100,000 [2] with a prevalence of 3.5 per 1,000 population [3]. As cervical myelopathy is a rarer condition, there is little reliable epidemiological data. Radiculopathy is caused by nerve root compression and presents with dermatomal and myotomal dysfunction in the upper limbs with general lower motor neuron signs of weakness, wasting, flaccid paralysis, and hyporeflexia. Specific tests used in the setting of cervical radiculopathy include Spurling’s test and manual cervical distraction; both of which may help to distinguish neurological pathology from other causes of a similar clinical picture. Myelopathy can present with a variety of symptoms: general upper motor neuron signs of weakness, spasticity, and hyperreflexia in both upper and lower limbs with Hoffmann’s and Babinski’s signs in the upper and lower limbs, respectively, as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction, clonus,
Imaging Modalities for Cervical Spondylotic Stenosis and Myelopathy
C. Green,J. Butler,S. Eustace,A. Poynton,J. M. O'Byrne
Advances in Orthopedics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/908324
Abstract: Cervical spondylosis is a spectrum of pathology presenting as neck pain, radiculopathy, and myelopathy or all in combination. Diagnostic imaging is essential to diagnosis and preoperative planning. We discuss the modalities of imaging in common practice. We examine the use of imaging to differentiate among central, subarticular, and lateral stenosis and in the assessment of myelopathy. 1. Introduction Imaging modalities for cervical spondylosis aim to assist the clinician in differentiating discogenic neck pain, radiculopathy, and myelopathy. Radiological assessment helps to localise the site and level of the disease for preoperative planning when surgical intervention is required. The current modalities in common use are pain film roentgenology, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography. Despite advances in diagnostic imaging plain film remains an inexpensive initial radiological evaluation of the spine in cervical spondylosis. Anteroposterior, lateral, and oblique radiographs can be acquired easily at the time of consultation. These images can show changes in the facet and uncovertebral, osteophytes, and disc space [1]. This is an indication of the underlying pathology but not diagnostic as these findings are common in the adult population [1]. Weight-bearing plain films can also assess alignment and sagittal canal diameter. Measurement of the anteroposterior diameter is typically determined on a lateral plain film as the distance from the posterior surface of the vertebral body to the closest point on the spinolaminar line at the pedicle level. However, this is a two-dimensional assessment of a three-dimensional structure and such measurements have shown to be inaccurate. Three-dimensional imaging modalities are now used for more accurate assessment. Lateral flexion-extention views are also useful initial investigations [2]. These will help to assess cervical range of motion and identify fused segments and instability. Instability is suggested where translation of >3.5?mm and sagittal plane angulation of >11?degrees are present [3]. Compared with other radiological studies available to evaluate the spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the greatest range of information [4]. It provides an accurate morphological assessment of both osseous and soft tissue structures including intervertebral discs, spinal ligaments, and the neural elements. Dynamic weight bearing MRI has recently been championed as the preferred technique for pathology-specific diagnosis [5, 6]. Computed tomography in isolation lacks the soft tissue detail achieved
How Staff RNs Perceive Nurse Manager Roles  [PDF]
Rebecca A. Feather, Patricia R. Ebright
Open Journal of Leadership (OJL) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojl.2013.23008
Abstract:

Purpose: Nurse managers’ behaviors and job satisfaction are commonly addressed in the literature; however, registered nurse perceptions of nurse manager behaviors provide a unique perspective that may inform future strategies designed to enhance RN job satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of registered nurses that were explored through focus groups to learn the behaviors of nurse managers that most influence registered nurse’s job satisfaction. Methods: Five focus groups were conducted through semi-structured interviews of a total of 28 RNs to provide data that were coded through qualitative content analysis for themes. Findings: The findings provide nurse managers with data related to the perceptions of RNs and the behaviors of managers that influence job satisfaction. In relation to the focus group’s discussions, a disconnection was identified between the perceptions of the RNs regarding their actual work issues and the nurse manager’s role on the hospital unit. There were five themes that emerged in the category of RNs perceived disconnect between work issues and the manager’s role. The daily role, manager meeting time, visibility of nurse managers, no longer a nurse, and RN preferences for the nurse manager role. Conclusion: Findings support past research in relation to the perceptions of RNs wanting to be respected, included in communication, and the need to feel cared for by nurse managers to have higher levels of job satisfaction. This study provided findings important to staff nurses, nurse managers and administration. There is a need for administrator support for nurse manager’s ability to spend more time on the unit with RNs to attend to direct care provider relationships and team building through communication with staff is a recommended approach for decreasing the disconnect between RNs and nurse managers.

Mathematical Content Understanding for Teaching: A Study of Undergraduate STEM Majors  [PDF]
Xiaoxia A. Newton, Rebecca C. Poon
Creative Education (CE) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2015.610101
Abstract: This paper investigates the nature of mathematical understanding that is needed to teach three foundational early algebra topics. These three topics include dividing fractions, linear equation in two variables and its graph, and quadratic function and its graph. Data from a sample of undergraduate STEM majors in a major research university affirm the importance of developing what Shulman (1999) calls “far more effective mathematics courses in U.S. undergraduate program” in order to equip future mathematics teachers with profound mathematical content understanding for teaching fundamental mathematics (Ma, 1999).
Educational Pedagogy Explored: Attachment, Voice, and Students’ Limited Recognition of the Purpose of Writing
Rebecca A. Fairchild
Journal of Arts and Humanities , 2013,
Abstract: The following teacher research case-study involved an exploration of educational pedagogy by working with a freshman composition student at a college university. All data collected for the study was gathered during the 2013 spring semester. The study was driven by an inquiry based approach where the researcher determined the center of focus that arose from an exploration of the student as a writer through a survey, a classroom observation, multiple one-on-one meetings, and email conversations. The focus area that arose was the student’s limited recognition that writing was done solely for school purposes. Related puzzlements stemming from this focus area included the student’s lack of attachment and lack of voice in her writing. The conclusive data provided insights for how to educate students in future classrooms regarding how vital it is for students to be able to attach themselves to their work.
Moving up the Grades: Relationship between Preschool Model and Later School Success
Rebecca A. Marcon
Early Childhood Research & Practice , 2002,
Abstract: A follow-up study of children who began school at age 4 (referred to as Year 1 in this study) was conducted to examine the influence of three different preschool models on later school success. These children from an urban school district were studied again in Year 5 as they prepared to leave the primary grades and in Year 6 when they were scheduled to enter fourth grade if not previously retained. The study examined report card grades, retention rates, and special education placement of 160 children at the end of their fifth year in school and 183 children at the end of their sixth year in school. The sample was 96% African American and 54% female, with 75% of the children qualifying for subsidized school lunch and 73% living in single-parent families. Academically, girls surpassed boys at the end of Year 5, and this difference persisted into the next grade level. Children whose preschool experience was more academically directed had been retained less often than peers. No differences attributable to preschool model were found for special education placement. By the end of children's fifth year in school, there were no significant differences in academic performance of children who had experienced three different preschool models. By the end of their sixth year in school, children whose preschool experiences had been academically directed earned significantly lower grades compared to children who had attended child-initiated preschool classes. Children's later school success appears to have been enhanced by more active, child-initiated early learning experiences. Their progress may have been slowed by overly academic preschool experiences that introduced formalized learning experiences too early for most children's developmental status.
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