oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 6 of 6 matches for " Rasu Elansezhian "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /6
Display every page Item
Effect of Nanoadditives with Surfactant on the Surface Characteristics of Electroless Nickel Coating on Magnesium-Based Composites Reinforced with MWCNT
Ranganathan Dhinakaran,Rasu Elansezhian,Arunachalam Arumugam Lalitha
Advances in Tribology , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/315965
Abstract: An experimental investigation has been carried out on optimizing process parameters of electroless nickel-phosphorous coatings on magnesium composite reinforced with carbon nanotube. A comprehensive experimental study of electroless Ni–P coatings on magnesium composite reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotube under specific coating conditions was performed. The electroless coating bath consists of nickel sulphate (26?g/L), sodium hypo-phosphite (30?g/L) as reducing agent, sodium acetate (16?g/L) as stabilizer, and ammonium hydrogen difluoride (8?g/L) as the complexing agent. The surfactant SLS was added in the solution for better wetting and spreading of coating on substrate. The stabilizer thiourea (1?ppm) was added in the bath to prevent decomposition of bath. Different nanoadditives such as ZnO, Al2O3, SiO with various concentrations were used in the bath and their influence on coating process characteristics were studied The nano additives such as ZnO, Al2O3, SiO were added at concentrations of 0.1%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% in the EN bath. The output parameters such as surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear rate, and surface morphology were measured. Surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the proposed method resulted in significant improvement on the quality of the coatings produced. 1. Introduction Electroless nickel coating has received widespread acceptance as it provides a uniform deposit on irregular surfaces, direct deposition on surface-activated nonconductors, formation of less porous deposits, and high hardness and excellent resistance to wear, abrasion, and corrosion [1, 2]. All smooth surfaces possess some degree of roughness, even if only at the atomic level. Correct function of the fabricated component often is critically dependent on its degree of roughness. Every machining operation bequeaths some characteristic on the machined surface. This characteristic microirregularities left by the cutting tool are termed as surface irregularity or surface roughness [3]. Roughness is sometimes an undesirable property, as it may cause friction, wear, drag, and fatigue, but it is sometimes beneficial, as it allows surfaces to trap lubricants and prevents them from welding together. Magnesium composites have promising properties for several industrial applications because of their low density [4]. Magnesium composite with metallic (electroless/electroplating) deposits are being used, in new light-weight engines which are less in weight and hence consume less energy. However, metallic coatings
Comparative Study on the Effects of Surfactants on the Electroless Copper Coated Solar Cell and Optimizing Its Process Parameters
M. Jeevarani,R. Elansezhian
Advances in Chemistry , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/513715
Abstract: An experimental investigation on optimizing process parameters in the electroless copper coatings on solar photovoltaic cells under specific coating conditions has been carried out and reported. Coating parameters such as pH, temperature, and surfactants concentration were varied, and corresponding coating thickness and voltage were measured. To optimize the above parameters, design of experiment was conducted using full factorial method. The pH was varied at 4 different values such as 4-5, 5-6, 8-9, and 9-10 and temperature was varied at different values such as 75°C, 80°C, 85°C, and 90°C. The two different surfactants such as Sodium Do-decyl sulfate and Cetyl tri ammonium bromide were added and their concentration was varied from 0–1.5?g/L to 0–1.8?g/L, respectively. When pH was 8-9, the coating thickness was maximum of 12?μm and 11.63?μm and it was minimum of 3?μm and 2.6?μm, when pH was at 4-5 for Sodium Do-decyl sulfate and Cetyl tri ammonium bromide respectively. The coating thickness increases up to 12?μm when the temperature was 85°C and further increase in temperature destabilizes the electroless bath. The coating thickness was a maximum of 11.25?μm/hr and 10.53?μm/hr, when the Sodium Dodecyl sulfate and Cetyl tri ammonium bromide concentrations were 1.2?g/L and 1.5?g/L, respectively. The increased coating thickness of solar cells imparts increased open circuit voltage from 0.43?V to 0.65?V. The detailed experimental results and their analysis are presented in the main paper. 1. Introduction Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight directly into electricity. A solar cell (also called photovoltaic cell or photoelectric cell) is a solid state electrical device that converts the energy of light directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. The manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline-silicon (c-Si) solar cells involves advanced technologies and sophisticated equipment not available in third-world country laboratories. Today, the conversion efficiency of advanced crystalline-silicon (c-Si) solar cells is up to 25%. But their manufacturing involves rather advanced technologies and equipment not available in most third-world country laboratories. Recently, electroless deposition of copper, using only a chemical bath, has received considerable attention. Major advantages over the electroless deposition process include the formation of a uniform deposit on irregular surfaces, direct deposition on surface activated nonconductors, and the formation of less porous and more corrosion resistant deposits [1]. Copper plating can change the appearance,
Medication adherence and glycemic control in patients with psychotic disorders in the Veterans Affairs healthcare system
Nelson LA,Graham MR,Lindsey CC,Rasu RS
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2011,
Abstract: Objective: To compare antihyperglycemic medication adherence and glycemic control between individuals with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders and a nonpsychiatric comparison group.Methods: This was a retrospective medical record review. A total of 124 subjects with diabetes (62 patients with schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder and 62 randomly selected, age-matched patients without a psychiatric illness) receiving their medical and psychiatric care exclusively through the Kansas City Veterans Affairs healthcare system during 2008 were included in the study. Adherence to antihyperglycemic and antipsychotic medication was determined by refill records obtained through the computerized patient record system to calculate the cumulative mean gap ratio. Hemoglobin A1C values were utilized to compare glycemic control between groups and compared to glycemic goals established by diabetes treatment guidelines.Results: Antihyperglycemic medication adherence was poor for both groups as approximately 60% of the psychotic disorder group and 75% of the nonpsychiatric comparison group were without antihyperglycemic medication for greater than 30 days during the 12-month period but adherence did not differ between the groups (p=0.182). Antipsychotic adherent subjects (=80% adherent) were more likely to be adherent to their antihyperglycemic medication (p=0.0003). There were no significant differences between groups in glycemic control.Conclusion: Antihyperglycemic medication adherence and glycemic control was less than optimal for both groups. There were no significant differences in antihyperglycemic medication adherence and glycemic control between patients with a psychotic disorder and those without a psychiatric illness.
Thymoglobulin Induction Dosing Strategies in a Low-Risk Kidney Transplant Population: Three or Four Days?
Karen L. Hardinger,Rafia S. Rasu,Rebecca Skelton,Brent W. Miller,Daniel C. Brennan
Journal of Transplantation , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/957549
Abstract: The optimal dose and duration of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) induction has not been defined. Methods. We compared the safety and efficacy of 2 dosing strategies, rATG 1.5 mg/kg for 4 days (=59) versus 2 mg/kg for 3 days (=59), in a retrospective, cohort study. Results. Two-year rejection-free survival was 95% in each group (=.983). Renal function and infection rates were similar. The incidence of leucopenia was similar, although the 2 mg/kg group was more likely to be thrombocytopenic on day 2 (4% versus 28%, =.04). Length of stay tended to be longer for the 1.5 mg/kg group (6.0±3.7 versus 5.1±1.9 days =.104). A cost savings of $920 per patient for rATG were seen in the 2 mg/kg group (=.122). Conclusions. Shorter, more intense dosing of rATG is safe and effective. The 3-day dose strategy resulted in a clinically shorter length of stay and may result in cost savings.
Medication adherence and glycemic control in patients with psychotic disorders in The Veterans Affairs healthcare system
Nelson,Leigh Anne; Graham,Maqual R.; Lindsey,Cameron C.; Rasu,Rafia S.;
Pharmacy Practice (Internet) , 2011, DOI: 10.4321/S1886-36552011000200001
Abstract: objective: to compare antihyperglycemic medication adherence and glycemic control between individuals with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders and a nonpsychiatric comparison group. methods: this was a retrospective medical record review. a total of 124 subjects with diabetes (62 patients with schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder and 62 randomly selected, age-matched patients without a psychiatric illness) receiving their medical and psychiatric care exclusively through the kansas city veterans affairs healthcare system during 2008 were included in the study. adherence to antihyperglycemic and antipsychotic medication was determined by refill records obtained through the computerized patient record system to calculate the cumulative mean gap ratio. hemoglobin a1c values were utilized to compare glycemic control between groups and compared to glycemic goals established by diabetes treatment guidelines. results: antihyperglycemic medication adherence was poor for both groups as approximately 60% of the psychotic disorder group and 75% of the nonpsychiatric comparison group were without antihyperglycemic medication for greater than 30 days during the 12-month period but adherence did not differ between the groups (p=0.182). antipsychotic adherent subjects (≥80% adherent) were more likely to be adherent to their antihyperglycemic medication (p=0.0003). there were no significant differences between groups in glycemic control. conclusion: antihyperglycemic medication adherence and glycemic control was less than optimal for both groups. there were no significant differences in antihyperglycemic medication adherence and glycemic control between patients with a psychotic disorder and those without a psychiatric illness.
Thymoglobulin Induction Dosing Strategies in a Low-Risk Kidney Transplant Population: Three or Four Days?
Karen L. Hardinger,Rafia S. Rasu,Rebecca Skelton,Brent W. Miller,Daniel C. Brennan
Journal of Transplantation , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/957549
Abstract: The optimal dose and duration of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) induction has not been defined. Methods. We compared the safety and efficacy of 2 dosing strategies, rATG 1.5?mg/kg for 4 days ( ) versus 2?mg/kg for 3 days ( ), in a retrospective, cohort study. Results. Two-year rejection-free survival was 95% in each group ( ). Renal function and infection rates were similar. The incidence of leucopenia was similar, although the 2?mg/kg group was more likely to be thrombocytopenic on day 2 (4% versus 28%, ). Length of stay tended to be longer for the 1.5?mg/kg group ( versus days ). A cost savings of $920 per patient for rATG were seen in the 2?mg/kg group ( ). Conclusions. Shorter, more intense dosing of rATG is safe and effective. The 3-day dose strategy resulted in a clinically shorter length of stay and may result in cost savings. 1. Introduction Induction therapy, using potent immunosuppressive agents in the critical, early period of allograft placement with the goal of decreasing the risk of acute rejection and potentially allowing lower overall intensity of the maintenance immunosuppressive regimen, is common in kidney transplantation. The induction agent of choice, along with dose and duration is controversial, center-specific, and often based on limited clinical data. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG, Thymoglobulin, Genzyme, Cambridge, MA) is FDA approved for treatment of acute rejection at a dose of 1.5?mg/kg for 7–14 days based on the results of a multicenter, double-blind randomized trial [1, 2]. Although rATG is not currently FDA approved as induction therapy in kidney transplantation, it is the most commonly administered agent for this purpose. Over one-half of the 70% of patients that receive an induction agent at the time of kidney transplantation receive rATG. Induction doses have ranged from 1–6?mg/kg/dose over 1–10 days with a more typical regimen of 1.5?mg/kg for 3–5 days [3–11] with a cumulative target of 4.5–10?mg/kg. In animal models, higher initial doses of shorter duration approximating a human-equivalent dose of 6?mg/kg were associated with more peripheral and central lymphocyte depletion and better allograft survival [12]. In humans, total doses of 5.7?mg/kg on average given as 1.5?mg/kg per day have been shown to produce similar outcomes in high risk recipients who received an average of 10.3?mg/kg [9]. Based on these models the optimal induction dose is felt to approximate 6?mg/kg [4, 7–10, 12]. Higher doses and prolonged duration of induction agents are thought to be associated with an increased risk of infection
Page 1 /6
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.