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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 145908 matches for " Rakesh K Sharma "
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Delamination in Fiber Reinforced Plastics: A Finite Element Approach  [PDF]
P. K. Rakesh, V. Sharma, I. Singh, D. Kumar
Engineering (ENG) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/eng.2011.35064
Abstract: The fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) are being used widely in the most diverse applications ranging from the aerospace to the sports goods industry. Drilling in particular is important to facilitate the assembly operations of structurally intricate composite products. The drilling of holes in FRPs leads to drilling induced damage which is an important research area. The researchers worldwide have tried to minimize the damage by optimizing the operating variables, and tool designs as well as by developing unconventional methods of hole making. Most of the work done so far has been experimental in nature with little or no focus on numerical simulation of the drilling behavior of FRPs. In the present research endeavor, a finite element model has been developed to investigate the drilling induced damage of FRP laminates.
Study and Analysis of the Behavior of a Generic Mesh Architecture of NoC routers
Prabhat K. Sharma,Rakesh Bairathi
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract:
Addressing Method for the Components of On-Chip Communication
Prabhat K. Sharma,Rakesh Bairathi
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract:
Early Diagnosis of Cardiac Toxicity Related to Antineoplastic Treatment  [PDF]
Maria Maiello, Rakesh K. Sharma, Marco Matteo Ciccone, Humananth K. Reddy, Pasquale Palmiero
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2011.22019
Abstract: Background: breast cancer because of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy causes cardiac disease, often it occurs on women just affected by hypertension and/or diabetes. All these conditions may affect left ventricular (LV) geometry, mass and diastolic function. The purpose of this study is to early detect these affections to improve heart failure prevention. Patients and methods: 134 women, affected by breast cancer, underwent to conventional transthoracic echocar-diography (TTE) and pulse wave tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI). A control group (CG) of 80 women unaffected by breast cancer, hypertension and diabetes was enrolled. Results: 54 of 134 women (40.2%), were affected by hypertension or diabetes too (Prone Group = PG), 8 by both, 80 (59.8%) were free (FG). Mean age of all patients was 45.4 years. The rates of LV eccentric hypertrophy and LV distolic dysfunction were statistically significant higher on FG group than controls, and on PG group than FG group. Conclusions: an abnormal LV diastolic function is more common among women affected by breast cancer after treatment than in general population, the same for LV eccentric hypertrophy but at a lower rate. 40% of women were affected by hypertension, diabetes or both, and as expected they have a higher rate of LV eccentric hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. This high prevalence of LV eccentric hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction, on asymptomatic women, affected by breast cancer, is a predictor of heart failure; Doppler-echo techniques may be helpful in early diagnosis.
Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction
Ashok Agarwal, Sajal Gupta, Rakesh K Sharma
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7827-3-28
Abstract: Free radical species are unstable and highly reactive. They become stable by acquiring electrons from nucleic acids, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates or any nearby molecule causing a cascade of chain reactions resulting in cellular damage and disease [1-4], figure 1) . There are two major types of free radical species: reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (NOS).The three major types of ROS are: superoxide (O2?-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl (OH?). The superoxide radical is formed when electrons leak from the electron transport chain [5]. The dismutation of superoxide results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The hydroxyl ion is highly reactive and can modify purines and pyrimidines and cause strand breaks resulting in DNA damage [6]. Some oxidase enzymes can directly generate the hydrogen peroxide radical.ROS have been implicated in more than 100 diseases [7-10]. They have a physiological and pathological role in the female reproductive tract. Numerous animal and human studies have demonstrated the presence of ROS in the female reproductive tract: ovaries, [11-15], fallopian tubes [16] and embryos [17]. ROS is involved in the modulation of an entire spectrum of physiological reproductive functions such as oocyte maturation, ovarian steroidogenesis, corpus luteal function and luteolysis [11,12,18]. ROS-related female fertility disorders may have common etiopathogenic mechanisms. ROS may also originate from embryo metabolism and from its surroundings.Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized during the enzymatic conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) [19-21]. With an unpaired electron, NO, which is a highly reactive free radical, damages proteins, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids and, together with other inflammatory mediators, results in cell and tissue damage, low-grade, sterile inflammation and adhesions [20]. NO potently relaxes arterial and venous smooth muscles and, less strongly, inhibits platelet a
ENHANCEMENT IN IN VITRO DIGESTIBILITY OF WHEAT STRAW OBTAINED FROM DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS DURING SOLID STATE FERMENTATION BY WHITE ROT FUNGI
Daljit S. Arora,Rakesh K. Sharma
BioResources , 2009,
Abstract: The study was carried out to find out the differences in the chemical composition of wheat straw obtained from three different regions of India, to compare their susceptibility to fungal degradation, and subsequently to evaluate the correlation between lignin loss and improvement in in vitro digestibility. Four Phlebia species were used to degrade different wheat straw samples during 30 days of incubation. In wheat straw obtained from central zone of India, most of the fungi were more selective in ligninolysis, with a moderate loss in total organic matter. The best found fungus, P. brevispora, enhanced the in vitro digestibility from 172 to 287 g/kg in north western, 165 to 275 g/kg in north eastern, and 145 to 259 g/kg in central zone with a respective loss of 163, 129, and 105 g/kg in total organic matter. Other three fungi P. fascicularia, P. floridensis, and P. radiata were also able to enhance the in vitro digestibility of all the wheat straw samples up to a significant extent. The study demonstrated that selective ligninolytic behaviour of fungi is influenced by the overall composition of wheat straw as governed by geographic location.
Aptamers—A Promising Approach for Sensing of Biothreats Using Different Bioinformatics Tools  [PDF]
Anamika Sharma, Rakesh Kumar Sharma
Soft Nanoscience Letters (SNL) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/snl.2013.34A001
Abstract: Intentional release of pathogens or biotoxin against humans, plants, or animals is an impending threat all over the world. Continuous monitoring of environment is required for their detection. These signals can help to distinguish whether the bioattack has occurred or not. Biosensors utilise biological response including different biochemical reactions, antigen antibody reactions, electrochemical reactions, aptameric reactions etc. The currently available biosensors have a limit of detection, specificity and less linearity which affect their sensitivity. Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides binding species which are capable of tightly binding to their distinguishing targets. They are evolved from random oligonucleotides pools by using different strategies. These are capable of conscientiously distinguishing their target ligands. They have high sensitivity and a wide range of detection limit. The versatility of nucleic acid based methods allowed for the design of specific aptamer sequences, typically on the order of 10 to 30 base pairs in length, identifying the different biothreat agents in the environment. By using different bioinformatics tools we can design RNA aptamers for toxins of lectin family.
Thinking beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: strategies to further reduce cardiovascular risk
Rakesh K Sharma, Vibhuti N Singh, Hanumanth K Reddy
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S5684
Abstract: king beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: strategies to further reduce cardiovascular risk Review (7068) Total Article Views Authors: Rakesh K Sharma, Vibhuti N Singh, Hanumanth K Reddy Published Date September 2009 Volume 2009:5 Pages 793 - 799 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S5684 Rakesh K Sharma1, Vibhuti N Singh2, Hanumanth K Reddy1 1Medical Center of South Arkansas, El Dorado, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Bayfront Medical Center, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL, USA Abstract: Several large statin trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some trials have also highlighted the significance of residual cardiovascular risk after treatment of LDL-C to target levels. This reflects the complex nature of residual cardiovascular risk. This residual risk is partially due to low HDL-C and high triglycerides (TG) despite achievement of LDL goals with statin therapy. The NCEP ATP III guidelines reported that low HDL-C is a significant and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and is inversely related to CHD. Epidemiologic studies have also shown a similar inverse relationship of HDL-C with CHD. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) may directly participate in the anti-atherogenic process by promoting efflux of cholesterol of the foam cells of atherogenic lesions. Many studies have demonstrated multiple anti-atherogenic actions of HDL-C and its role in promoting efflux of cholesterol from the foam cells. The residual risk by increased TG with or without low HDL-C can be assessed by calculating non–HDL-C and a reduction in TG results in decreased CHD.
Thinking beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: strategies to further reduce cardiovascular risk
Rakesh K Sharma,Vibhuti N Singh,Hanumanth K Reddy
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2009,
Abstract: Rakesh K Sharma1, Vibhuti N Singh2, Hanumanth K Reddy11Medical Center of South Arkansas, El Dorado, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Bayfront Medical Center, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL, USAAbstract: Several large statin trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some trials have also highlighted the significance of residual cardiovascular risk after treatment of LDL-C to target levels. This reflects the complex nature of residual cardiovascular risk. This residual risk is partially due to low HDL-C and high triglycerides (TG) despite achievement of LDL goals with statin therapy. The NCEP ATP III guidelines reported that low HDL-C is a significant and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and is inversely related to CHD. Epidemiologic studies have also shown a similar inverse relationship of HDL-C with CHD. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) may directly participate in the anti-atherogenic process by promoting efflux of cholesterol of the foam cells of atherogenic lesions. Many studies have demonstrated multiple anti-atherogenic actions of HDL-C and its role in promoting efflux of cholesterol from the foam cells. The residual risk by increased TG with or without low HDL-C can be assessed by calculating non–HDL-C and a reduction in TG results in decreased CHD.Keywords: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, statins, coronary heart disease
Enhanced apoptosis and electrostatic acetylcholi-nesterase activity of abnormally hydrophobic envi-ronment in alzheimer’s plaques  [PDF]
Rakesh Sharma, Soonjo Kwon
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2008, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2008.13030
Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is considered a slow neuronal dysfunction process through hypoxia, ischemia and leads to apoptosis mediated senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Due to non-invasive approach of plaque characterization, computational techniques based on Brownian dynamics simulation are unique to speculate the electrostatic and kinetic properties of Acetylcho-linesterase (AChE). Typically the MRI spectros-copy high choline peak and enzyme specific to Alzheimer’s Disease (specificity constant (kcat/Km) of AChE) appeared associated with apoptosis and hypoxia. A simple display between synergy of cytokines, apoptosis, elevated AChE and choline is postulated as initial events. The events may be distributed heterogeneously within the senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). The role of decreased brain AChE and synergy was associated with specific Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic (MRS) pattern profiles in AD. These findings suggest that that the altered AChE and early apoptosis events in AD may be associated with specific MR spectral peak patterns. This study opens the possibility of reduced AChE levels causing high choline and reduced N-acetyl ace-tate (NAA) neurotransmitter by MRS after initial apoptosis and/or inflammation to make amyloid plaques in the cerebral tissue of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. These results can be useful in clinical trials on AD lesions.
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