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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 947 matches for " Rajeev Sangal "
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Collaborative Creation of Digital Content in Indian Languages
Akshar Bharati,Rajeev Sangal
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: The world is passing through a major revolution called the information revolution, in which information and knowledge is becoming available to people in unprecedented amounts wherever and whenever they need it. Those societies which fail to take advantage of the new technology will be left behind, just like in the industrial revolution. The information revolution is based on two major technologies: computers and communication. These technologies have to be delivered in a COST EFFECTIVE manner, and in LANGUAGES accessible to people. One way to deliver them in cost effective manner is to make suitable technology choices, and to allow people to access through shared resources. This could be done throuch street corner shops (for computer usage, e-mail etc.), schools, community centres and local library centres.
Information Revolution
Akshar Bharati,Vineet Chaitanya,Rajeev Sangal
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: The world is passing through a major revolution called the information revolution, in which information and knowledge is becoming available to people in unprecedented amounts wherever and whenever they need it. Those societies which fail to take advantage of the new technology will be left behind, just like in the industrial revolution. The information revolution is based on two major technologies: computers and communication. These technologies have to be delivered in a COST EFFECTIVE manner, and in LANGUAGES accessible to people. One way to deliver them in cost effective manner is to make suitable technology choices (discussed later), and to allow people to access through shared resources. This could be done throuch street corner shops (for computer usage, e-mail etc.), schools, community centers and local library centres.
Anusaaraka: Machine Translation in Stages
Akshar Bharati,Vineet Chaitanya,Amba P. Kulkarni,Rajeev Sangal
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: Fully-automatic general-purpose high-quality machine translation systems (FGH-MT) are extremely difficult to build. In fact, there is no system in the world for any pair of languages which qualifies to be called FGH-MT. The reasons are not far to seek. Translation is a creative process which involves interpretation of the given text by the translator. Translation would also vary depending on the audience and the purpose for which it is meant. This would explain the difficulty of building a machine translation system. Since, the machine is not capable of interpreting a general text with sufficient accuracy automatically at present - let alone re-expressing it for a given audience, it fails to perform as FGH-MT. FOOTNOTE{The major difficulty that the machine faces in interpreting a given text is the lack of general world knowledge or common sense knowledge.}
Language Access: An Information Based Approach
Akshar Bharati,Vineet Chaitanya,Amba P. Kulkarni,Rajeev Sangal
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: The anusaaraka system (a kind of machine translation system) makes text in one Indian language accessible through another Indian language. The machine presents an image of the source text in a language close to the target language. In the image, some constructions of the source language (which do not have equivalents in the target language) spill over to the output. Some special notation is also devised. Anusaarakas have been built from five pairs of languages: Telugu,Kannada, Marathi, Bengali and Punjabi to Hindi. They are available for use through Email servers. Anusaarkas follows the principle of substitutibility and reversibility of strings produced. This implies preservation of information while going from a source language to a target language. For narrow subject areas, specialized modules can be built by putting subject domain knowledge into the system, which produce good quality grammatical output. However, it should be remembered, that such modules will work only in narrow areas, and will sometimes go wrong. In such a situation, anusaaraka output will still remain useful.
External Sandhi and its Relevance to Syntactic Treebanking
Kolachina, Sudheer;Sharma, Dipti Misra;Gadde, Phani;Vijay, Meher;Sangal, Rajeev;Bharati, Akshar;
Polibits , 2011,
Abstract: externai sandhi is a linguistic phenomenon which refers to a set of sound changes that occur at word boundaries. these changes are similar to phonological processes such as assimilation and fusion when they apply at the level of prosody, such as in connected speech. external sandhi formation can be orthographically reflected in some languages. external sandhi formation in such languages, causes the occurrence of forms which are morphologically unanalyzable, thus posing a problem for all kind of nlp applications. in this paper, we discuss the implications that this phenomenon has for the syntactic annotation of sentences in telugu, an indian language with agglutinative morphology. we describe in detail, how external sandhi formation in telugu, if not handled prior to dependency annotation, leads either to loss or misrepresentation of syntactic information in the treebank. this phenomenon, we argue, necessitates the introduction of a sandhi splitting stage in the generic annotation pipeline currently being followed for the treebanking of indian languages. we identify one type of external sandhi widely occurring in the previous version of the telugu treebank (version 0.2) and manually split all its instances leading to the development of a new version 0.5. we also conduct an experiment with a statistical parser to empirically verify the usefulness of the changes made to the treebank. comparing the parsing accuracies obtained on versions 0. 2 and 0. 5 of the treebank, we observe that splitting even just one type of external sandhi leads to an increase in the overall parsing accuracies.
An Algorithm for Aligning Sentences in Bilingual Corpora Using Lexical Information
Akshar Bharati,V. Sriram,A. Vamshi Krishna,Rajeev Sangal,S. M. Bendre
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: In this paper we describe an algorithm for aligning sentences with their translations in a bilingual corpus using lexical information of the languages. Existing efficient algorithms ignore word identities and consider only the sentence lengths (Brown, 1991; Gale and Church, 1993). For a sentence in the source language text, the proposed algorithm picks the most likely translation from the target language text using lexical information and certain heuristics. It does not do statistical analysis using sentence lengths. The algorithm is language independent. It also aids in detecting addition and deletion of text in translations. The algorithm gives comparable results with the existing algorithms in most of the cases while it does better in cases where statistical algorithms do not give good results.
LERIL : Collaborative Effort for Creating Lexical Resources
Akshar Bharati,Dipti M Sharma,Vineet Chaitanya,Amba P Kulkarni,Rajeev Sangal,Durgesh D Rao
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: The paper reports on efforts taken to create lexical resources pertaining to Indian languages, using the collaborative model. The lexical resources being developed are: (1) Transfer lexicon and grammar from English to several Indian languages. (2) Dependencey tree bank of annotated corpora for several Indian languages. The dependency trees are based on the Paninian model. (3) Bilingual dictionary of 'core meanings'.
Anusaaraka: Overcoming the Language Barrier in India
Akshar Bharati,Vineet Chaitanya,Amba P. Kulkarni,Rajeev Sangal,G Umamaheshwara Rao
Computer Science , 2003,
Abstract: The anusaaraka system makes text in one Indian language accessible in another Indian language. In the anusaaraka approach, the load is so divided between man and computer that the language load is taken by the machine, and the interpretation of the text is left to the man. The machine presents an image of the source text in a language close to the target language.In the image, some constructions of the source language (which do not have equivalents) spill over to the output. Some special notation is also devised. The user after some training learns to read and understand the output. Because the Indian languages are close, the learning time of the output language is short, and is expected to be around 2 weeks. The output can also be post-edited by a trained user to make it grammatically correct in the target language. Style can also be changed, if necessary. Thus, in this scenario, it can function as a human assisted translation system. Currently, anusaarakas are being built from Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Bengali and Punjabi to Hindi. They can be built for all Indian languages in the near future. Everybody must pitch in to build such systems connecting all Indian languages, using the free software model.
Considerations and Open Issues in Delay Tolerant Network’S (DTNs) Security  [PDF]
Harminder Singh Bindra, Amrit Lal Sangal
Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/wsn.2010.28076
Abstract: Delay Tolerant Network (DTN) addresses challenges of providing end-to-end service where end-to-end data forwarding paths may not exist. Security and privacy are crucial to the wide deployments of DTN. Without security and privacy guarantees, people are reluctant to accept such a new network paradigm. To address the security and privacy issues in DTNs, we in this paper have discussed the various open issues and challenges which need to be addressed to evolve the secure DTNs.
Electron Ionization Cross Sections of PF3 Molecule  [PDF]
Rajeev Kumar
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2015.312192
Abstract: Partial single and double differential cross sections with their sums through direct and dissociative ionization of PF3 have been evaluated at fixed electron energies 100 and 200 eV, by using modified Jain-Khare semi-empirical approach. To the best of my knowledge no other data of differential cross sections are available for the comparison. I have also calculated integral ionization cross sections with their ionization rate coefficients by using M-B distribution. No other data of partial ionization cross section are available till now. The sum/or total of evaluated partial cross sections reveal good agreement with available theoretical data.
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