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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 223880 matches for " R. Sindhuja "
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Herbaceous life forms of Maruthamalai Hills, Southern Western Ghats, India
R. SINDHUJA,A. RAJENDRAN,P. JAYANTHI
International Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants , 2012,
Abstract: The present paper deals with 130- herbaceous species belonging to 34- families were recorded. The life forms spectrum showed Chaemaephytes, Hemicryptophytes, Geophytes, Therophytes are abundantly found in this area. The dominance of Chaemaephytes indicates the tropical dry deciduous forest and humid conditions. The anthropogenic disturbances are greatly affected the biodiversity and structural characteristics of a community.
Efficiency of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria Isolated from Sand Dunes of Chennai Coastal Area
R. Muthezhilan,B.S. Sindhuja,A. Jaffar Hussain,M. Jayaprakashvel
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial bacteria that colonize the plant root and enhance the plant growth. The use of PGPR is steadily increasing in agriculture and offers an attractive way to replace chemical fertilizers, pesticides and supplements. In the present study, PGPR were isolated from 18 different rhizosphere soil samples of coastal sand dune plants, belonging to the genus Ipomoea sp. collected from the Chennai coastal area. For isolation of bacteria from soil samples, pour plate technique was followed. The rhizobacterial population was ranged from 4.4x106-7.5x107 CFU g-1. From that, 46 morphologically different bacterial strains were isolated. Among 46, 18 strains exhibited the production of Indole Acetic Acid. (IAA). When screened for phosphate solubilzing activity, six strains showed maximum activity. All these selected six strains were screened for seed germination among which these two strains (AMET1136 and AMET 1148) showed remarkable increase in the seed germination of black gram and green gram. For plant growth promotion, three types of treatments namely, seed bacterization, soil drenching and mixed (seed+soil) were carried out to check the potential of these two strains. Among that one strain which was identified as Pseudomonas sp. AMET1148 showed remarkable and significant increase in shoot length and root length of the tested plants. The study concluded that PGPR from coastal sand dund plants can be developed as plant growth promoters in agricultural crops.
PUTATIVE DRUG TARGET IDENTIFICATION FOR CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS: AN INSILICO PROTEOME ANALYSIS
Praveena A.,R. Sindhuja,Anuradha V.,S.K.M. Habeeb
International Journal of Biomedical Research , 2013, DOI: 10.7439/ijbr.v2i2.88
Abstract: The whole genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and the host genome such as human has provided a Subtractive genomic approach, which can be used to identify potent vaccine and drug targets. In the present study subtractive genomic approach has been used to identify therapeutic target in Chlamydia trachomatis. C.trachomatis infection is now the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide. The BlastP search against Homo sapiens revealed 551 non-homologous protein sequences out of 874 in C.trachomati. Further analysis of these non human homologous proteins predicted that 142 essential proteins were involved in unique metabolic pathways of C.trachomatis. The prediction of sub-cellular localization of the essential proteins was used to identify the membrane proteins which can be used as vaccine targets. There are 63 unique essential non-human homologous therapeutic targets found in the current study, which plays a vital role in the Peptidoglycan biosynthesis, Phosphotransferase system, Fatty acid biosynthesis and Bacterial secretion system of C.trachomatis.
PUTATIVE DRUG TARGET IDENTIFICATION FOR CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS: AN INSILICO PROTEOME ANALYSIS
Praveena A.,R. Sindhuja,Anuradha V.,S.K.M. Habeeb
International Journal of Biomedical Research , 2011, DOI: 10.7439/ijbr.v2i2.88
Abstract: The whole genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and the host genome such as human has provided a Subtractive genomic approach, which can be used to identify potent vaccine and drug targets. In the present study subtractive genomic approach has been used to identify therapeutic target in Chlamydia trachomatis. C.trachomatis infection is now the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide. The BlastP search against Homo sapiens revealed 551 non-homologous protein sequences out of 874 in C.trachomati. Further analysis of these non human homologous proteins predicted that 142 essential proteins were involved in unique metabolic pathways of C.trachomatis. The prediction of sub-cellular localization of the essential proteins was used to identify the membrane proteins which can be used as vaccine targets. There are 63 unique essential non-human homologous therapeutic targets found in the current study, which plays a vital role in the Peptidoglycan biosynthesis, Phosphotransferase system, Fatty acid biosynthesis and Bacterial secretion system of C.trachomatis.
Identification of Water Stress in Citrus Leaves Using Sensing Technologies
Kaitlin Johnson,Sindhuja Sankaran,Reza Ehsani
Agronomy , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/agronomy3040747
Abstract: Water stress is a serious concern in the citrus industry due to its effect on citrus quality and yield. A sensor system for early detection will allow rapid implementation of control measures and management decisions to reduce any adverse effects. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) presents a potentially suitable technique for early stress detection through elemental profile analysis of the citrus leaves. It is anticipated that the physiological change in plants due to stress will induce changes in the element profile. The major goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy as a method of water stress detection for potential use in the citrus industry. In this work, two levels of water stress were applied to Cleopatra (Cleo) mandarin, Carrizo citrange, and Shekwasha seedlings under the controlled conditions of a greenhouse. Leaves collected from the healthy and stressed plants were analyzed using LIBS, as well as with a spectroradiometer (visible-near infrared spectroscopy) and a thermal camera (thermal infrared). Statistical classification of healthy and stressed samples revealed that the LIBS data could be classified with an overall accuracy of 80% using a Na?ve-Bayes and bagged decision tree-based classifiers. These accuracies were lower than the classification accuracies acquired from visible-near infrared spectra. An accuracy of 93% and higher was achieved using a bagged decision tree with visible-near infrared spectral reflectance data.
Sickle Cell Disease Activates Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Induce Cathepsins K and V Activity in Endothelial Cells
Philip M. Keegan,Sindhuja Surapaneni,Manu O. Platt
Anemia , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/201781
Abstract: Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease that increases systemic inflammation as well as the risk of pediatric strokes, but links between sickle-induced inflammation and arterial remodeling are not clear. Cathepsins are powerful elastases and collagenases secreted by endothelial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages in atherosclerosis, but their involvement in sickle cell disease has not been studied. Here, we investigated how tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) and circulating mononuclear cell adhesion to human aortic endothelial cells (ECs) increase active cathepsins K and V as a model of inflammation occurring in the arterial wall. ECs were stimulated with TNFα and cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from persons homozygous for sickle (SS) or normal (AA) hemoglobin. TNFα was necessary to induce cathepsin K activity, but either PBMC binding or TNFα increased cathepsin V activity. SS PBMCs were unique; they induced cathepsin K in ECs without exogenous TNFα (=4, <0.05). Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) significantly reduced cathepsins K and V activation by 60% and 51%, respectively. Together, the inflammation and activated circulating mononuclear cells upregulate cathepsin activity through JNK signaling, identifying new pharmaceutical targets to block the accelerated pathology observed in arteries of children with sickle cell disease.
EMBEDDED BASED PASSENGER INFOTAINMENT SYSTEM
N. NANDINI, S. PAVITHRA, G. SINDHUJA, K. SUKANYA
International Journal of Electrical, Electronics and Data Communication , 2013,
Abstract: In this paper we report on a system kept stationary at the bus-stand that can effectively help the public to participate in bus transportation facilities to its fullest. A bus that is few meters away from the bus –stand is identified by this passenger infotainment system and the details of that particular bus is provided to the passenger. The bus identification process involves usage of Radio Frequency technology and bus details are announced by Voice and displayed in Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) unit. The summary of current research provides details about the integration between Microcontroller and RF transceiver, LCD display and Voice Announcement. The future work intended to be done is also mentioned.
Computational analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., genotype BAT93) lycopene -cyclase and -carotene hydroxylase gene’s cDNA
Subhash Janardhan Bhore,Kassim Amelia,Edina Wang,Sindhuja Priyadharsini
Bioinformation , 2013,
Abstract: The identification of genes and understanding of genes’ expression and regulation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is necessary in order to strategize its improvement using genetic engineering techniques. Generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is useful in rapid isolation, identification and characterization of the genes. To study the gene expression in P. vulgaris pods tissue, ESTs generation work was initiated. Early stage and late stage bean-pod-tissues cDNA libraries were constructed using CloneMiner cDNA library construction kit. In total, 5972 EST clones were isolated using random method of gene isolation. While processing ESTs, we found lycopene -cyclase (PvLCY- ) and -carotene hydroxylase (PvCHY- ) gene’s cDNA. In carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, PvLCY- catalyzes the production of carotene; and PvCHY- is known to function as a catalyst in the production of lutein and zeaxanthin. To understand more about PvLCY- and PvCHY- , both strands of both cDNA clones were sequenced using M13 forward and reverse primers. Nucleotide and deduced protein sequences were analyzed and annotated using online bioinformatics tools. Results showed that PvLCY- and PvCHY- cDNAs are 1639 and 1107 bp in length, respectively. Analysis results showed that PvLCY- and PvCHY- gene’s cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) that encodes for 502 and 305 amino acid residues, respectively. The deduced protein sequence analysis results also showed the presence of conserved domains needed for PvLCY- and PvCHY- functions. The phylogenetic analysis of both PvLCY- and PvCHY- proteins showed it’s closeness with the LCY- and CHY- proteins from Glycine max, respectively. The nucleotide sequence of PvLCY- and PvCHY- gene’s cDNA and it’s annotation is reported in this paper.
Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) Detection Using Visible, Near Infrared and Thermal Imaging Techniques
Sindhuja Sankaran,Joe Mari Maja,Sherrie Buchanon,Reza Ehsani
Sensors , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/s130202117
Abstract: This study demonstrates the applicability of visible-near infrared and thermal imaging for detection of Huanglongbing (HLB) disease in citrus trees. Visible-near infrared (440–900 nm) and thermal infrared spectral reflectance data were collected from individual healthy and HLB-infected trees. Data analysis revealed that the average reflectance values of the healthy trees in the visible region were lower than those in the near infrared region, while the opposite was the case for HLB-infected trees. Moreover, 560 nm, 710 nm, and thermal band showed maximum class separability between healthy and HLB-infected groups among the evaluated visible-infrared bands. Similarly, analysis of several vegetation indices indicated that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), Vogelmann red-edge index (VOG) and modified red-edge simple ratio (mSR) demonstrated good class separability between the two groups. Classification studies using average spectral reflectance values from the visible, near infrared, and thermal bands (13 spectral features) as input features indicated that an average overall classification accuracy of about 87%, with 89% specificity and 85% sensitivity could be achieved with classification models such as support vector machine for trees with symptomatic leaves.
Sickle Cell Disease Activates Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Induce Cathepsins K and V Activity in Endothelial Cells
Philip M. Keegan,Sindhuja Surapaneni,Manu O. Platt
Anemia , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/201781
Abstract: Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease that increases systemic inflammation as well as the risk of pediatric strokes, but links between sickle-induced inflammation and arterial remodeling are not clear. Cathepsins are powerful elastases and collagenases secreted by endothelial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages in atherosclerosis, but their involvement in sickle cell disease has not been studied. Here, we investigated how tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) and circulating mononuclear cell adhesion to human aortic endothelial cells (ECs) increase active cathepsins K and V as a model of inflammation occurring in the arterial wall. ECs were stimulated with TNFα and cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from persons homozygous for sickle (SS) or normal (AA) hemoglobin. TNFα was necessary to induce cathepsin K activity, but either PBMC binding or TNFα increased cathepsin V activity. SS PBMCs were unique; they induced cathepsin K in ECs without exogenous TNFα ( , ). Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) significantly reduced cathepsins K and V activation by 60% and 51%, respectively. Together, the inflammation and activated circulating mononuclear cells upregulate cathepsin activity through JNK signaling, identifying new pharmaceutical targets to block the accelerated pathology observed in arteries of children with sickle cell disease. 1. Introduction Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder that causes in vivo polymerization of hemoglobin molecules into rigid fibers within red blood cells, deforming them in the canonically described “sickle” shape. Rigid, sickled red blood cells and the byproducts of their hemolysis cause chronic vascular damage and increase systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, mobilized mononuclear cells [1], and pathological levels of increased monocyte adhesion to the endothelium [2, 3]. Overall, these pathological inflammatory conditions and mononuclear cell-endothelial cell interactions may contribute to intimal thickening, and lumen narrowing seen in pulmonary hypertension and stroke lesions of children; pulmonary hypertension is responsible for 20–30% of sickle-cell-related deaths in adult patients [4, 5] and 11% of children with sickle cell disease will suffer from a major stroke by the age of 16. Both of these clinical syndromes are characterized by vascular remodeling [6–8]. Vascular remodeling analogous to stroke lesions in sickle cell disease has been observed in atherosclerosis, the major cardiovascular disease, where mononuclear cell infiltration of the subendothelial space, degradation of the
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