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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 340504 matches for " R. H. Crozier "
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The Chromosomes of Three Australian Dacetine Ant Species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
R. H. Crozier
Psyche , 1968, DOI: 10.1155/1968/41712
Abstract:
Chromosome Number Polymorphism inthe Sawfly Janus Integer (Hymenoptera, Cephidae)
R. H. Crozier,E. F. Taschenberg
Psyche , 1972, DOI: 10.1155/1972/27907
Abstract:
Life-Pattern Studies on an AustralianSphinctomyrmex (Formicidae: Ponerinae;Cerapachyini): Functional Polygyny, BroodPeriodicity and Raiding Behavior.
A. Buschnger,C. Peeters,R. H. Crozier
Psyche , 1989, DOI: 10.1155/1989/13614
Abstract:
Inter-Nest Interactions, Nest Autonomy, and Reproductive Specialization in an Australian Arid-Zone Ant, Rhytidoponera Sp. 12
P. Pamilo,R. H. Crozier,J. Fraser
Psyche , 1985, DOI: 10.1155/1985/14980
Abstract:
Caste and Reproduction in Ants: Not All Mated Egg-Layers are “Queens”
Christian Peeters,Ross H. Crozier
Psyche , 1988, DOI: 10.1155/1988/52368
Abstract:
Form Follows Function: Structural and Catalytic Variation in the Class A Flavoprotein Monooxygenases
Karen Crozier-Reabe,Graham R. Moran
International Journal of Molecular Sciences , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/ijms131215601
Abstract: Flavoprotein monooxygenases (FPMOs) exhibit an array of mechanistic solutions to a common chemical objective; the monooxygenation of a target substrate. Each FPMO efficiently couples reduction of a flavin cofactor by NAD(P)H to oxygenation of the target substrate via a (hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate. This purpose of this review is to describe in detail the Class A flavoprotein hydroxylases (FPMO) in the context of the other FPMO classes (B–F). Both one and two component FPMOs are found in nature. Two-component enzymes require, in addition to the monooxygenase, the involvement of a reductase that first catalyzes the reduction of the flavin by NAD(P)H. The Class A and B FPMOs are single-component and manage to orchestrate the same net reaction within a single peptide. The Class A enzymes have, by some considerable margin, the most complete research record. These enzymes use choreographed movements of the flavin ring that facilitate access of the organic substrates to the active site, provide a means for interaction of NADPH with the flavin, offer a mechanism to sequester the dioxygen reduction chemistry from solvent and a means to release the product. The majority of the discrete catalytic events of the catalytic cycle can be observed directly in exquisite detail using spectrophotometric kinetic methods and many of the key mechanistic conclusions are further supported by structural data. This review attempts to compile each of the key observations made for both paradigm and newly discovered examples of Class A FPMOs into a complete catalytic description of one enzymatic turnover.
Brothers from Different Mothers—Confucius, Benedict, and Francis: The Historical Search for Humane Leadership  [PDF]
Cheryl Crozier Garcia
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies (JHRSS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jhrss.2013.13006
Abstract: Ongoing global economic downturn, social and political upheavals, revolutionary changes in technology, and frightening climate change are having massive impacts on the ways people live and work. This paper examines the teachings of 3 of these leaders: Confucius, Benedict of Nursia, and Francis of Assisi, whose teachings may inform the ways in which today’s leaders motivate a workforce and deal with uncertainty. Though separated by both time and culture, these 3 men shared common biographical traits that informed their teachings and shaped their ideas about appropriate behaviors for leaders and their subordinates. Compassion, sincerity, wisdom, and trust are traits that all 3 stress as vital for leaders trying to accomplish meaningful goals in the face of adversity.
Meta-population structure in a coral reef fish demonstrated by genetic data on patterns of migration, extinction and re-colonisation
Line K Bay, M Julian Caley, Ross H Crozier
BMC Evolutionary Biology , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-8-248
Abstract: Acanthochromis polyacanthus displayed strong genetic structure among regions (ΦST = 0.81, P < 0.0001) that supported an equilibrium isolation-by-distance model (r = 0.77, P = 0.001). Significant structuring across the continental shelf was only evident in the northern region (ΦST = 0.31, P < 0.001) and no evidence of isolation-by-distance was found within any region. Pairwise ΦST values indicated overall strong but variable genetic structure (mean ΦST among reefs within regions = 0.28, 0.38, 0.41), and asymmetric migration rates among reefs with low genetic structure. Genetic differentiation among younger reefs was greater than among older reefs supporting a meta-population propagule-pool colonisation model. Variation in genetic diversities, demographic expansion and population growth estimates indicated more frequent genetic bottlenecks/founder effects and subsequent population expansion in the central and southern regions compared to the northern one.Our findings provide genetic evidence for meta-population dynamics in a direct developing coral reef fish and we reject the equilibrium island and isolation-by distance models at local spatial scales. Instead, strong non-equilibrium genetic structure appears to be generated by genetic bottlenecks/founder effects associated with population reductions/extinctions and asymmetric migration/(re)-colonisation of such populations. These meta-population dynamics varied across the geographical range examined with edge populations exhibiting lower genetic diversities and higher rates of population expansion than more central populations. Therefore, coral reef species may experience local population reductions/extinctions that promote overall meta-population genetic differentiation.Coral reefs are important ecosystems in ecological, evolutionary and socio-economic contexts but are under increasing threat from anthropogenic impacts [1,2]. The most effective conservation tool available to coral reef managers so far has been the us
Phylogenetic biodiversity assessment based on systematic nomenclature
Ross H Crozier,Lisa J Dunnett,Paul-Michael Agapow
Evolutionary Bioinformatics , 2005,
Abstract: Biodiversity assessment demands objective measures, because ultimately conservation decisions must prioritize the use of limited resources for preserving taxa. The most general framework for the objective assessment of conservation worth are those that assess evolutionary distinctiveness, e.g. Genetic (Crozier 1992) and Phylogenetic Diversity (Faith 1992), and Evolutionary History (Nee & May 1997). These measures all attempt to assess the conservation worth of any scheme based on how much of the encompassing phylogeny of organisms is preserved. However, their general applicability is limited by the small proportion of taxa that have been reliably placed in a phylogeny. Given that phylogenizaton of many interesting taxa or important is unlikely to occur soon, we present a framework for using taxonomy as a reasonable surrogate for phylogeny. Combining this framework with exhaustive searches for combinations of sites containing maximal diversity, we provide a proof-of-concept for assessing conservation schemes for systematized but un-phylogenised taxa spread over a series of sites. This is illustrated with data from four studies, on North Queensland flightless insects (Yeates et al. 2002), ants from a Florida Transect (Lubertazzi & Tschinkel 2003), New England bog ants (Gotelli & Ellison 2002) and a simulated distribution of the known New Zealand Lepidosauria (Daugherty et al. 1994). The results support this approach, indicating that species, genus and site numbers predict evolutionary history, to a degree depending on the size of the data set.
Phylogenetic biodiversity assessment based on systematic nomenclature
Ross H Crozier,Lisa J Dunnett,Paul-Michael Agapow
Evolutionary Bioinformatics , 2006,
Abstract: Biodiversity assessment demands objective measures, because ultimately conservation decisions must prioritize the use of limited resources for preserving taxa. The most general framework for the objective assessment of conservation worth are those that assess evolutionary distinctiveness, e.g. Genetic (Crozier 1992) and Phylogenetic Diversity (Faith 1992), and Evolutionary History (Nee & May 1997). These measures all attempt to assess the conservation worth of any scheme based on how much of the encompassing phylogeny of organisms is preserved. However, their general applicability is limited by the small proportion of taxa that have been reliably placed in a phylogeny. Given that phylogenizaton of many interesting taxa or important is unlikely to occur soon, we present a framework for using taxonomy as a reasonable surrogate for phylogeny. Combining this framework with exhaustive searches for combinations of sites containing maximal diversity, we provide a proof-of-concept for assessing conservation schemes for systematized but un-phylogenised taxa spread over a series of sites. This is illustrated with data from four studies, on North Queensland flightless insects (Yeates et al. 2002), ants from a Florida Transect (Lubertazzi & Tschinkel 2003), New England bog ants (Gotelli & Ellison 2002) and a simulated distribution of the known New Zealand Lepidosauria (Daugherty et al. 1994). The results support this approach, indicating that species, genus and site numbers predict evolutionary history, to a degree depending on the size of the data set.
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