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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 224121 matches for " R. Ferdinand "
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ética e educa??o: caminhos buberianos
R?hr, Ferdinand;
Educa??o em Revista , 2013, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-46982013005000002
Abstract: the relationship between ethics and education is approached in three aspects: the ethical education, understood as the educational initiative that tries to help the learner become ethical; the pedagogical ethics, that deals with the educator's ethics of action; and the ethics of the community of educators, that looks into the ethical questions involved in the collaboration of educators in similar pedagogical projects. the philosophic and pedagogical thoughts of martin buber were chosen as a proposal that differs from both ethical dogmatism and ethical relativism. instead of imperatives of ethical action, a description of attitudes that helps to identify the way to an ethical life can be found in buber. in the book, "the way of man according to the teachings of hasidism", buber uses legends that express the ethical-existential road that a man should take. the intention of our interpretation of this proposal by buber is to extract the religious/mystic content that these legends carry and present the anthropological and philosophical fundaments his thoughts on ethics.
Spirituality and Human Formation
Ferdinand R?hr
Poiésis , 2011,
Abstract: This article addresses the topic of spirituality in a philosophical-anthropological perspective. It assumes that the concept of spirituality can only move away from media and esoteric colloquialism to the extent that it is part of the understanding of the human being in its entirety and multidimensionality. Distinguishing, in this sense, five basic dimensions: physical, sensory, emotional, mental and spiritual as well as an unclosed number of cross-theme dimensions. Explaining what is meant by spiritual dimension from the phenomena of freedom, truth, and love. Understanding the process of humanization and, thereby, as the human quest for accomplishments include the human dimension within the cross-themes, always all the basic dimensions, especially the spiritual dimension, thus creating a continuous and more cohesive union of all the dimensions.
Confian a - um conceito básico da Educa o no pensamento filosófico e pedagógico de Otto Friedrich Bollnow
Ferdinand R?hr
Eccos Revista Científica , 2011,
Abstract: This work is an analysis of Bollnow′s phenomenological research on the theme of trust / mistrust and its consequences for education. With the growing phenomenon of mistrust being almost omnipresent in life today, Bollnow seeks to highlight the importance of trust both in human life, and in education. An existential possibility of the human being is found in trust in "Being" as part of their spiritual dimension. Indicated as a pedagogic task, besides the generation of a basic trust in early childhood, through a friendly pedagogical atmosphere, and a formation of a critical attitude in relation to human attitudes, which in fact deserve suspicion, an educational aid towards the conquest of trust in "Being" by the student. It depends on the dignity of the pedagogical action to recognize the possible failures in the face of the students' free will and overcome them with new attempts of deeper human experiences in the pedagogical relationship, truly dialogical.
Approximating parameters in nonlinear reaction diffusion equations
Robert R. Ferdinand
Electronic Journal of Differential Equations , 2001,
Abstract: We present a model describing population dynamics in an environment. The model is a nonlinear, nonlocal, reaction diffusion equation with Neumann boundary conditions. An inverse method, involving minimization of a least-squares cost functional, is developed to identify unknown model parameters. Finally, numerical results are presented which display estimates of these parameters using computationally generated data.
ética e educa o: caminhos buberianos Ethics and education: buberian ways
Ferdinand R?hr
Educa??o em Revista , 2013,
Abstract: A rela o entre ética e Educa o está sendo abordada em três aspectos: a educa o ética, compreendida como iniciativa educacional, que visa ajudar o educando a se tornar ser ético; a ética pedagógica, que trata da ética do agir do educador; e a ética da comunidade dos educadores, que se volta para quest es éticas envolvidas na colabora o dos educadores em projetos pedagógicos. Escolheu-se, como objeto de análise, o pensamento filosófico e pedagógico de Martin Buber enquanto proposta que se distingue tanto do dogmatismo quanto do relativismo ético. N o encontramos em Buber imperativos do agir ético, mas uma descri o de atitudes que nos auxiliam a identificar o caminho para uma vida ética. Em seu livro "O Caminho do Homem segundo a Doutrina Hassídica", utiliza-se de lendas que expressam o caminho ético-existencial a ser tomado pelo homem. O intento da nossa interpreta o é abstrair o conteúdo religioso-místico das lendas e apresentar os fundamentos antropológicos e filosóficos do seu pensamento sobre a ética. The relationship between ethics and education is approached in three aspects: the ethical education, understood as the educational initiative that tries to help the learner become ethical; the pedagogical ethics, that deals with the educator's ethics of action; and the ethics of the community of educators, that looks into the ethical questions involved in the collaboration of educators in similar pedagogical projects. The philosophic and pedagogical thoughts of Martin Buber were chosen as a proposal that differs from both ethical dogmatism and ethical relativism. Instead of imperatives of ethical action, a description of attitudes that helps to identify the way to an ethical life can be found in Buber. In the book, "The way of man according to the teachings of Hasidism", Buber uses legends that express the ethical-existential road that a man should take. The intention of our interpretation of this proposal by Buber is to extract the religious/mystic content that these legends carry and present the anthropological and philosophical fundaments his thoughts on ethics.
Models and Neural Bases of the Believing Process  [PDF]
Motoaki Sugiura, Rüdiger J. Seitz, Hans-Ferdinand Angel
Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science (JBBS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jbbs.2015.51002
Abstract: Departing from the long debates on the role of faith/belief, recent interdisciplinary research has turned to characterize the features of the psychophysical processes underlying believing. Here we review recent cognitive neuroscience models of the believing process and propose a conceptual framework that integrates current theoretical and empiric knowledge about the processes of believing. There are theories that elegantly explain believing as a self-organization process of cognitive and emotional elements. Adding to the component of self-organized belief representation, dual-component models assume a belief evaluation component, which is probably supported by the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and explains the stability of the belief despite the changing environment. Borrowing an idea from the neural models for the mental representation of action or situation, inclusion of both perceptive and action informations as the construct of belief representation allows the intimate relationship between a specific belief and a specific range of behaviour. Furthermore, inclusion of the personal value or affective information in the representation explains the deep impact of one’s emotional and physical state on the believing process. For associating perception, action, and value in a representation, the medial frontal cortex (MFC) may play a key role. Recent neuro-cognitive models of self-cognition explain the developmental origin of such a representation and the hierarchically nested structure of three levels of complexity in the representations: basic physical level, interpersonal level, and higher social level. The integrated model provides a comprehensive perspective of the believing process which suggests the importance and future directions of this interdisciplinary approach.
The Origin of Kurds  [PDF]
Ferdinand Hennerbichler
Advances in Anthropology (AA) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/aa.2012.22008
Abstract: Kurds are traditionally regarded as Iranians and of Iranian origin, and therefore as Indo-Europeans, mainly, because they speak Iranian. This hypothesis is largely based on linguistic considerations and was predominantly developed by linguists. In contrast to such believes, newest DNA-research of advanced Human Anthropology indicates, that in earliest traceable origins, forefathers of Kurds were obviously descendants of indigenous (first) Neolithic Northern Fertile Crescent aborigines, geographically mainly from outside and northwest of what is Iran of today in Near East and Eurasia. Oldest ancestral forefathers of Kurds were millennia later linguistically Iranianized in several waves by militarily organized elites of (R1a1) immigrants from Central Asia. These new findings lead to the understanding, that neither were aborigine Northern Fertile Crescent Eurasian Kurds and ancient Old-Iranian speaker (R1a1) immigrants from Asia one and the same people, nor represent the later, R1a1 dominated migrating early Old-Iranian-speaker elites from Asia, oldest traceable ancestors of Kurds. Rather, constitute both historically completely different populations and layers of Kurdish forefathers, each with own distinct genetic, ethnical, linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These new insights indicate first inter-disciplinary findings in co-op- eration with two international leading experts in their disciplines, Iranologist Gernot L. Windfuhr, Ann Arbor, and DNA Genealogist Anatole A. Klyosov, Boston, USA.
Kar-daKI-ka 21st ce. B.C.E. Karda Land of Valiant Mountain People Central Zagros East Terminological Analysis  [PDF]
Ferdinand Hennerbichler
Advances in Anthropology (AA) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/aa.2014.43021
Abstract:

The toponym “kar-daKI-ka” (“ma-da kar-daKI-ka”) means land of “Karda”, which derives most likely out of Akkadian “qarda” (“qurda”) for heroic, brave, valiant, and warlike (mountain) people. It was geographically located in ancient heartlands of the Guti(ans) in central Zagros east areas in Northwest Iran of today, and was documented in several late Sumerian UrIII sources at the end of the 3rd millennium B.C.E. from Girsu in south Mesopotamia. Origin and ethnic affiliations of the inhabitants of the land of “Karda” are not known. The term “kar-daKI-ka” was one of the oldest cuneiform expressions used by Mesopotamians to denote various indigenous Zagros hilly/mountain nomads of multi-ethnical origin in the North and the (North-)East, whom they regarded as warlike and also as uncivilized because they were at the time mainly not urban organized in contrast to lowland Mesopotamians. Available cuneiform sources indicated that Mesopotamians saw “kar-daKI-ka” in consecutive connection with Guti(ans): first, because of its location in the center of (former) dominating Guti power coalitions in areas of central Zagros (east); second, because of the image of its population as warlike, similar to Guti(ans) where (who) was (were) portrayed by Mesopotamians; third, because of further suggesting that its society(ies) could have been militarily orsganized, possibly migrating and temporarily prevailing inter-regionally (across the Zagros); and last but not least, because of its obvious geo-strategic importance even for far away late UrIII leaders of south Mesopotamia, regardless whether or not they effectively controlled the area which seems for the time in question unlikely. Mesopotamians used to describe the inter-connected ancestral habitat of various multi-ethnic Zagros mountain coalitions in a vague terminology, and in waxing and waning concepts who were influenced by changing policies. They did not see regions (lands) like “kar-da

Eroticism: Why It Still Matters  [PDF]
Ferdinand Fellmann
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2016.77098
Abstract: This article is about Eroticism as a key-concept in the psychological understanding of the human mind. The meaning of the term can be defined as follows: Eroticism is the way humans experience sexuality as a self-sufficient mental activity. Sexuality underlies different social rules in varying cultural contexts and may lead to different ways of thinking, but there is no evidence that cultural diversity actually leads to fundamentally different ways of feeling. The constant disposition for recreational rather than procreational sex makes eroticism a medium of human creativity. In this sense, eroticism is considered a central factor in the process of hominisation. The crucial cognitive competence which makes for the uniqueness of our species is due to the transformation of sexuality into eroticism and its disposition for social learning. In the animal kingdom, sex contributes to the welfare of the horde, while in human society eroticism contributes to individual self-recognition and paves the way to moral awareness. Methodologically, I plead for a cooperation of psychological and anthropological research, each utilizing and combining the complementary aspects of both approaches.
Memory and the Timeless Time of Eros  [PDF]
Ferdinand Fellmann
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2017.87063
Abstract: This paper deals with the perception of time. Chronometric time dominates the rhythm of modern daily life. But in the backstage the inner consciousness of time remains nearly unaltered. Hence, the task of phenomenological psychology is to resolve the paradox of the twofold perception of time. The key to the riddle is remembering. For the modern cognitive approach remembering is considered a construction which is made largely on the basis of chronometric time. I would argue instead that remembering is primarily a matter of feeling or affection. A strong affection is that of love, which overwhelms men and women with great intensity. This experience is analogous in structure and function to involuntary memory which surprisingly brings back lost sensations. When one compares the two famous examples of involuntary memory in the works of Marcel Proust and Henry Miller, the first thing that emerges is something of the nature of Epicurean Eros, the complement of Stoic Logos. According to this idea memory throws light on the timeless time of erotic love as the primary source of personal identity.
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