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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 727 matches for " Pinder RM "
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Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction?
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S23035
Abstract: Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Editorial (4564) Total Article Views Authors: Pinder RM Published Date July 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 21 - 22 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S23035 Roger M Pinder International Journal of Wine Research, York, UK The International Journal of Wine Research has published a number of articles related to wine and cancer, which have concluded that wine and its polyphenol components may have largely beneficial effects. Thus, a review of the role of wine in cancer concluded that regular and moderate wine consumption was associated with a decreased risk of mortality from certain cancers, and that the risk increased progressively with immoderate consumption.1 Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Roger Pinder Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Does wine prevent dementia? Editor's choice Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012 Editorial Foreword: International Journal of Wine Research More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Resveratrol comes of age Readers of this article also read: Does wine prevent dementia? Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Amino acid-responsive Crohn's disease: a case study Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Genetic variation in sugar composition among muscadine, Florida hybrid bunch and bunch grape genotypes Reasons for drinking wine and other beverages – comparison across motives in older adults Regulatory and institutional developments in the Ontario wine and grape industry Characterization of esterase activity in the Bianchetta trevigiana grape variety under reducing conditions Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S23196
Abstract: Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Editorial (5184) Total Article Views Authors: Pinder RM Published Date July 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 19 - 20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S23196 Roger M Pinder International Journal of Wine Research, York, UK The Editor of the International Journal of Wine Research has had a long-standing interest in the genetics of wine grape varieties. Two publications, in particular, piqued the interest from both the scientific and consumer point of view. Cabernet Sauvignon is the offspring of a chance cross-pollination of Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc in western France several centuries ago. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Roger Pinder Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Does wine prevent dementia? Editor's choice Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012 Editorial Foreword: International Journal of Wine Research More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Resveratrol comes of age Readers of this article also read: Does wine prevent dementia? Wine consumers’ environmental knowledge and attitudes: Influence on willingness to purchase Evidence-based decision-making within the context of globalization: A “Why–What–How” for leaders and managers of health care organizations The cognitive basis of diglossia in Arabic: Evidence from a repetition priming study within and between languages Epigenomics in cancer management Amino acid-responsive Crohn's disease: a case study DataGenno: building a new tool to bridge molecular and clinical genetics Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S25116
Abstract: More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Editorial (4924) Total Article Views Authors: Pinder RM Published Date September 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 23 - 24 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S25116 Roger M Pinder International Journal of Wine Research, York, UK The beneficial impact of moderate and regular consumption of alcohol and wine for cognitive decline and the risks of dementia has been widely studied and reported.1-4 The pages of the International Journal of Wine Research have seen two reviews of the field,5,6 while our sister journal, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, has also focused on this issue, first in 2006 with a research investigation in Danish women,7 and now in a more recent comprehensive review including 143 published papers.8 One of the more poignant aspects of the new publication is that the authors, Edward Neafsey and Michael Collins from Loyola University in Chicago, come from a background of experimental molecular pharmacology and wondered why moderate alcohol exposure appeared to protect rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex brain slice cultures from the toxicity of amyloid-β, the protein that has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their curiosity led to a literature search on whether alcohol protects against AD and other forms of cognitive impairment in humans, an endeavor that rather overwhelmed them with the immensity of the data. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Roger Pinder Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Does wine prevent dementia? Editor's choice Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012 Editorial Foreword: International Journal of Wine Research Resveratrol comes of age Readers of this article also read: Does wine prevent dementia? Wine consumers’ environmental knowledge and attitudes: Influence on willingness to purchase The cognitive basis of diglossia in Arabic: Evidence from a repetition priming study within and between languages Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Resveratrol comes of age Amino acid-responsive Crohn's disease: a case study Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Reasons for drinking wine and other beverages – comparison across motives in older adults Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
Editor's choice
Pinder RM
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S35278
Abstract: Editor's choice Review (2590) Total Article Views Authors: Pinder RM Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 321 - 322 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S35278 Received: 22 June 2012 Accepted: 22 June 2012 Published: 20 July 2012 Roger M Pinder Editor-In-Chief, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment Schizophrenia remains one of the most debilitating and intractable illnesses in psychiatry. Despite the availability of effective drug treatment since the beginning of the psychopharmacological era in the early 1960s with the introduction of the first antipsychotic chlorpromazine, the subsequent development of second generation or atypical antipsychotics, and the effectiveness of certain types of psychotherapy, many patients are unresponsive and remain unwell for several years or relapse after apparent response. Only clozapine has proven efficacy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but many patients still do not respond. Polypharmacy is common, with many physicians choosing to augment rather than switch medications. Schizophrenia may be in part a neurodevelopmental disorder and involve changes in brain structure, and credence has been given to the idea that the prodromal phase, before overt symptoms have appeared, should already have been addressed with aggressive treatment. Various aspects of schizophrenia and its treatment, as well as the associated use of antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder and Tourette syndrome, have been covered in the pages of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment during the first half of 2012. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Roger Pinder Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Does wine prevent dementia? Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012 Editorial Foreword: International Journal of Wine Research More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Resveratrol comes of age Readers of this article also read: Performance in L1 and L2 observed in Arabic-Hebrew bilingual aphasic following brain tumor: A case constitutes double dissociation Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite Does wine prevent dementia? The cognitive basis of diglossia in Arabic: Evidence from a repetition priming study within and between languages Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Epigenomics in cancer management DataGenno: building a new tool to bridge molecular and clinical genetics Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Long-term treatment of bipolar disorder with a radioelectric asymmetric conveyor Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
Pinder RM
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S42654
Abstract: Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012 Review (909) Total Article Views Authors: Pinder RM Published Date February 2013 Volume 2013:9 Pages 195 - 196 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S42654 Received: 11 January 2013 Accepted: Published: 08 February 2013 Roger M Pinder Editor-in-Chief, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, York, UK There were three papers in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment that attracted the most attention in the last year, all recording more than 10,000 hits since publication.Varying widely in subject matter, by far the most popular of the trio, with almost 30,000 hits, was a publication on a new physical method for treating psychiatric disorders, in this case bipolar disorder,1 while publications on alcohol consumption and cognitive risk2 and dietary treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)3 were in second and third place, respectively. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Roger Pinder Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Does wine prevent dementia? Editor's choice Editorial Foreword: International Journal of Wine Research More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Resveratrol comes of age Readers of this article also read: Does wine prevent dementia? Cognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kong Differences in risk aversion between young and older adults Aggressive behavior, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms in elderly subjects Stimulus-dependent effects on right ear advantage in schizophrenia Titanate nanowire scaffolds decorated with anatase nanocrystals show good protein adsorption and low cell adhesion capacity Semantics, pragmatics, and formal thought disorders in people with schizophrenia Response to methylphenidate by adult and pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: the Spanish multicenter DIHANA study Escitalopram tolerability as mono- versus augmentative therapy in patients with affective disorders: a naturalistic study Burden of illness associated with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy among adults seeking treatment in the US: results from a retrospective chart review and cross-sectional survey
Editor's choice
Pinder RM
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012,
Abstract: Roger M PinderEditor-In-Chief, Neuropsychiatric Disease and TreatmentSchizophrenia remains one of the most debilitating and intractable illnesses in psychiatry. Despite the availability of effective drug treatment since the beginning of the psychopharmacological era in the early 1960s with the introduction of the first antipsychotic chlorpromazine, the subsequent development of second generation or atypical antipsychotics, and the effectiveness of certain types of psychotherapy, many patients are unresponsive and remain unwell for several years or relapse after apparent response. Only clozapine has proven efficacy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but many patients still do not respond. Polypharmacy is common, with many physicians choosing to augment rather than switch medications. Schizophrenia may be in part a neurodevelopmental disorder and involve changes in brain structure, and credence has been given to the idea that the prodromal phase, before overt symptoms have appeared, should already have been addressed with aggressive treatment. Various aspects of schizophrenia and its treatment, as well as the associated use of antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder and Tourette syndrome, have been covered in the pages of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment during the first half of 2012.
Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
Pinder RM
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2013,
Abstract: Roger M PinderEditor-in-Chief, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, York, UKThere were three papers in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment that attracted the most attention in the last year, all recording more than 10,000 hits since publication.Varying widely in subject matter, by far the most popular of the trio, with almost 30,000 hits, was a publication on a new physical method for treating psychiatric disorders, in this case bipolar disorder,1 while publications on alcohol consumption and cognitive risk2 and dietary treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)3 were in second and third place, respectively.
Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction?
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2011,
Abstract: Roger M PinderInternational Journal of Wine Research, York, UKThe International Journal of Wine Research has published a number of articles related to wine and cancer, which have concluded that wine and its polyphenol components may have largely beneficial effects. Thus, a review of the role of wine in cancer concluded that regular and moderate wine consumption was associated with a decreased risk of mortality from certain cancers, and that the risk increased progressively with immoderate consumption.1
More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2011,
Abstract: Roger M PinderInternational Journal of Wine Research, York, UKThe beneficial impact of moderate and regular consumption of alcohol and wine for cognitive decline and the risks of dementia has been widely studied and reported.1-4 The pages of the International Journal of Wine Research have seen two reviews of the field,5,6 while our sister journal, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, has also focused on this issue, first in 2006 with a research investigation in Danish women,7 and now in a more recent comprehensive review including 143 published papers.8 One of the more poignant aspects of the new publication is that the authors, Edward Neafsey and Michael Collins from Loyola University in Chicago, come from a background of experimental molecular pharmacology and wondered why moderate alcohol exposure appeared to protect rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex brain slice cultures from the toxicity of amyloid-β, the protein that has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their curiosity led to a literature search on whether alcohol protects against AD and other forms of cognitive impairment in humans, an endeavor that rather overwhelmed them with the immensity of the data.
Editor’s choice: grapevine genetics are not just for researchers but also important to consumers
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2013,
Abstract: Roger M PinderInternational Journal of Wine Research, York, UKThe genetic profiling of Vitis vinifera species has long been a rather esoteric interest of researchers investigating the family relationships between different wine grapes, partly as a surer way of identification than the traditional study of vine leaves known as ampelography. Two recent publications, each examining more than 1000 wine grape varieties, have expanded the field not only for the academic researcher1 but also for the consumer.2 The first publication has already been discussed in an editorial in this journal,3 but the latter is a newly published tome of more than 1200 pages authored by two distinguished Masters of Wine from the UK, Jancis Robinson and Julia Harding, and by the academic researcher José Vouillamoz from the University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel, Switzerland, who is responsible for the Swiss Vitis Microsatellite Database (SVMD). The new book covers not only the genetics of wine grapes but also viticultural characteristics, places of cultivation, and the various wines and their taste. Some of these factors are more important to wine consumers than to researchers.
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