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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1855 matches for " Pietro Nenoff "
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Dissecting the pathways of tumour escape: " question of life and death?"
Tchernev, Georgi;Nenoff, Pietro;
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0365-05962010000200022
Abstract: apoptotic pathways are providing important saveguard mechanisms in protection from cancer by eliminating altered and often harmful cells. the disturbances of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis are also found on specific signal-transduction pathways within the tumour cells and between these and the immune system. the article focuses attention on the evolution of the melanocytic naevi in the direction of a dysplastic or tumour cell. the determination of single molecules as prognostic parameters within cancer genesis seems to be problematic. new hopes are being placed on the treatment with tw-37, abt-737 and tat-bim, which, to an extent, are able to support the programmed cell death. the clinical importance of these innovative therapies remains to be seen and should therefore, be viewed with considerable criticism.
Mimetismo antigênico seguido de espalhamento de epítopos: agente desencadeador patogênico da morfologia clínica do líquen plano e de sua transi??o para a Síndrome de Graham-Little-Piccardi-Lassueur e para a ceratose líquenóide cr?nica - Hipótese médica ou realidade?
Tchernev, Georgi;Nenoff, Pietro;
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S0365-05962009000600019
Abstract: literature data analysis, providing an exact explanation of the lichen planus pathogenesis, as well as its transition into other rare forms such as keratosis lichenoides chronica or graham lassueur piccardi little syndrome are scant, or totally missing. the chronological course of the disease, known in the literature as lichen planus, varies. some patients develop lichen planus or lichen nitidus and there is no logical explanation why. it is also not clear why single patients initially develop ulcerative lesions in the area of the mucosa and only in a few of them these lesions affect the skin. antigen mimicry and epitope spreading could be the possible pathogenic inductor in cases of lichenoid dermatoses, as well as the cause for their transition into ulcerative, exanthematous or other rare forms. the epitope spreading is probably not the leading pathogenetic factor in lichen planus but a phenomenon which occurs later. this manuscript analyzes some basic pathogenic aspects and presents some possible medical hypotheses regarding the heterogenic clinical picture and pathogenesis of lichen planus and lichenoid like pathologies of the skin which, in the near future should be analyzed in details in order to clarify several dilemmas the clinical dermatologist has to face.
Lymphogranuloma venereum: "a clinical and histopathological chameleon?"
Tchernev, Georgi;Salaro, Cristina;Costa, Mariana Carvalho;Patterson, James W.;Nenoff, Pietro;
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0365-05962010000400015
Abstract: lymphogranuloma venereum is an infection caused by a variety of the bacterium chlamydia trachomatis. both genital and extragenital manifestations of the disease can cause serious differential diagnostic difficulties, indirectly leading to progression and dissemination of the infection. this work describes cases of patients with lymphogranuloma venereum showing atypical clinical and/or histopathological findings. it also focuses on alternative therapeutic approaches, such as surgical excision at stage 1, that may lead to a positive outcome. it is not completely clear whether histopathological findings of lymphogranuloma venereum can reveal progression or changes in the course of the disease over time, as is the case in other diseases. we conclude that both clinical and histopathological observations in a larger number of patients are needed in order to further evaluate the findings presented in this article.
Epidemiology and Changes in Patient-Related Factors from 1997 to 2009 in Clinical Yeast Isolates Related to Dermatology, Gynaecology, and Paediatrics
Viktor Czaika,Pietro Nenoff,Andreas Gl?ckner,Wolfgang Fegeler,Karsten Becker,Arno F. Schmalreck
International Journal of Microbiology , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/703905
Abstract: From 1997 to 2009, 1,862 dermatology, gynaecology, and paediatrics (DGP) associated clinical yeast isolates were analysed for species occurrence, specimen origin and type, (multi-) resistance pattern, and testing period. The top seven of the isolated DGP-associated species remained the same as compared to total medical wards, with Candida albicans (45%) as most frequent pathogen. However, the DGP wards and DGP ICUs showed species-specific profiles; that is, the species distribution is clinic-specific similar and however differs in their percentage from ward to ward. By applying the “one fungus one name” principle, respectively, the appropriate current taxonomic species denominations, it has been shown that no trend to emerging species from 1998 to 2008 could be detected. In particular the frequently isolated non-Candida albicans species isolated in the DGP departments have already been detected in or before 1997. As yeasts are part of the cutaneous microbiota and play an important role as opportunistic pathogens for superficial infections, proper identification of the isolates according to the new nomenclature deems to be essential for specific and calculated antifungal therapy for yeast-like DGP-related infectious agents. 1. Introduction Superficial fungal infections are often chronic and recurring. It has been estimated that approximately 15% of the population has fungal infections of the skin (tinea pedis or athlete’s foot) or nails (onychomycosis) or of the feet. These infections are common in older children and adults [1]. Distal subungual, proximal, subungual, and white superficial onychomycoses are usually caused by dermatophytes, but Candida spp. may be present in all types in less than 1% of these cases [2]. In the past, yeasts are thought to be simply skin contaminants [3]; however, yeasts and nondermatophyte moulds may also cause toenail onychomycosis [4–8]. A higher proportion of yeasts is generally found in onychomycosis, where dermatophytes (68%), yeasts (29%), and moulds (3%) are the most causative fungal pathogens [9]. Some Candida spp. causing onychomycosis were reported to be partly resistant to oral antifungal agents (AFAs). In patients with chronic mucocutaneous infections, the main yeast pathogen is Candida (C.) albicans, but C. tropicalis, C parapsilosis, Issatchenkia (I.) orientalis, and Meyerozyma (M.) guilliermondii may also contribute to these infections [10]. It has been suggested by Clayton and Noble [11] that the spread of yeasts in the hospital ward occurs in a similar way to the spread of Staphylococcus aureus. In
Speed of Adjustment and Infraday/Intraday Volatility in the Italian Stock and Futures Markets  [PDF]
Pietro Gottardo
Modern Economy (ME) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/me.2011.25082
Abstract: We estimate the speed of adjustment of prices to value changes in the Italian stock and futures markets using variances in different return intervals. The paper presents evidence that an assumption of linearity for the relationship volatility-time is untenable when intraday and infraday data are used jointly. Prices adjust to new information within three days, but the process is complex with evidence of overshooting and divergent movements in the smaller return intervals. Firms behave differently according to their inclusion or exclusion from the MIB30 index. The speed of adjustment is strongly related to firm-specific characteristics and the log of capitalization explains some of the cross-sectional variability in the adjustment coefficients for most of the return intervals.
Coronary sinus reentrant tachycardia after atrial fibrillation ablation: From bad to worse  [PDF]
Pietro Turco
World Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases (WJCD) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/wjcd.2014.42006
Abstract: Herein we present a case of atrial tachycardia as a sequel of AF ablations. A 42-year-old man was admitted to our department because of a very symptomatic tachycardia. The patient, because of paroxysmal AF and typical atrial flutter, had been already submitted (three times) to ablation procedures in both left (pulmonary vein insulation) and right atria (cavo-tricuspidal isthmus). During the electrophysiological study, a huge and very fast atrial tachycardia was induced: 230 ms cycle length, 1/1 atrio-ventricular conduction with the ventricular rate of 260 bpm, complete left bundle branch block, and clinically recognized by the patient. Four minutes later, a 2/1 AV conduction without branch block permitted mapping and ablation. A high-density mapping around isthmus and coronary sinus (CS) was performed. The analysis of the chronological activation clearly showed a circuit propagation around the CS ostium with a very slow conduction in the anterior zone enlightened by the tight color progression, and counterclockwise activation of the right atrium lateral wall. In anterior zone of CS ostium diastolic fragmented electrograms were detected. After preventing his position localization, radiofrequency delivering (35 W) was effective to interrupt the arrhythmia in 3 seconds. Energy delivering was continued to anchor the lesion to the inferior vena cava. Confirmation of successful ablation was determined by unsuccessful attempts at reinduction of the arrhythmia, in basal state and during infusion of isoproterenol.
A Theoretical Overview of Bioresponse to Magnetic Fields on the Earth’s Surface  [PDF]
Pietro Volpe
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2014.510097
Abstract: This survey points to the mechanisms of bioresponse caused by magnetic fields (MFs), paying attention to their action not only on ions, molecules and macromolecules, but also on cells, tissues and organisms. The significance of findings concerning the MF-dependence of cell proliferation, necrosis or apoptosis was judged by comparing the results obtained in a solenoid, where an MF can be added to the geomagnetic field (GMF), with those obtained in a magnetically shielded room, where the MFs can be attenuated or null. This comparative criterion was particularly appropriate when the differences detectable between the data provided by experimental samples and the data provided by control samples were rather small, as observed in estimating the MF-influence on total DNA replication, RNA transcription and polypeptide translation. The MF-induced inhibition of apoptosis was considered as a risk potentially leading to accumulation of cancer cells. The analysis also surveyed the MF-dependence of the interactions between host animal cells and infecting bacteria. In relation to studies on the origin and adaptation of life on the Earth, theoretical insights paving the way to elucidating the MF-interactions with biostructures and biosystems of different orders of organization evaluated the possible involvement of the so-called “biological windows”. Analogously to what is known for ionizing radiations, the efficiency of the applied MFs appeared to depend on the complexity of their biological targets.
The Outrageous Discourse of Psychoanalysis for Present-Day Academic Institutions  [PDF]
Pietro Barbetta
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2015.33021
Abstract: In the following essay I’m going to take a radical position concerning the tendency to eliminate psychoanalysis from the European Academic field and the failure of psychoanalysts and relational therapists to defend psychoanalysis from such aggression. My question is why in Italy—just to make a local example, which I am involved in—different kinds of psychoanalytical traditions are not able to defend themselves from this attack while in France, for another example, all the different branches of relational therapies have been able to unite in making a common effort to take a position for psychoanalysis. One of the main problems, in my opinion, concerns the constitutive marginality of psychoanalysis in relation to Academic Institutions. In my way of writing, I will use psychoanalysis, with “P” in capital character, when referred to Academia, and psychoanalysis, with no capital character, when referred to clinical practice.
The Unexpected Existence of Coding and Non-Coding Fragments along the Eukaryotic Gene  [PDF]
Pietro Volpe
Advances in Biological Chemistry (ABC) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/abc.2015.52009
Abstract: The pathways leading to synthesis and post-synthetic modification of DNA employed methionine as donor of atoms: the carbon that came from its –CH3 served for DNA replication and repair either in bacteria or humans; its entire –CH3 served instead for building N6-methyladenine and 5-methylcytosine on bacterial DNA and 5-methylcytosine alone on human DNA. In humans, although a slight extra-S asymmetric methylation appeared de novo yielding on parental DNA 5’-m5CpC-3’/ 3’-GpG-5’, 5’-m5CpT-3’/3’-GpA-5’ and 5’-m5CpA-3’/3’-GpT-5’ monomethylated dinucleotide pairs, a heavy symmetric methylation involved in S semiconservatively newly made DNA to guarantee genetic maintenance of –CH3 in 5’-m5CpG-3’/3’-Gpm5C-5’ dimethylated dinucleotide pairs. In this framework, an inverse correlation was found between bulk genomic DNA methylation occurring in S and bulk polyA-containing pre-mRNA transcription taking place in G1 and G2. Thus, probes of 1 × 106 Daltons (constructed using sheared by sonication newly made methylated DNA filaments) revealed a modular organization in genes: after the hypermethylated promoter, they exhibited an alternation of unmethylated coding and methylated uncoding sequences. This encouraged the search for a language that genes regulated by methylation should have in common. An initial deciphering of restriction minimaps with hypomethylatable exons vs. hypermethylatable promoters and introns was improved when the bisulfite technique allowed a direct sequencing of m5C. In lymphocytes, where the transglutaminase gene is inactive, its promoter exhibited two fully methylated CpG-rich domains at 5’ and one fully unmethylated CpG-rich domain at 3’, including the site +1 and a 5’-UTR. At variance, in HUVEC cells, where the transglutaminase gene is active, in the first CpG-rich domain of promoter few doublets lost their –CH3. Such an inverse correlation suggested new hypotheses especially in connection with repair-modification: UV radiation would cause demethylation in given loci of a promoter by chance, whilst even a partial demethylation in this promoter would be able to resume a previously silent pre-mRNA transcription.
catena-Poly[zinc-tris(μ-dimethylcarbamato-κ2O:O′)-zinc-μ-(2-phenylbenzimidazolido-κ2N:N′]
Mark A. Rodriguez,Dorina F. Sava,Tina M. Nenoff
Acta Crystallographica Section E , 2012, DOI: 10.1107/s1600536811053177
Abstract: The crystal structure of the title compound, [Zn2(C13H9N2)(C3H6NO2)3]n, displays a long chiral chain. This is composed of zinc-dimer clusters capped by dimethylcarbamate ligands, which lie on crystallographic twofold rotation axes and are polymerically linked in one dimension by 2-phenylbenzimidadole (2–PBImi) organic ligands. The two Zn2+ ions defining the dimetal cluster are crystallographically independent, but display very similar coordination modes and tetrahedral geometry. As such, each Zn2+ ion is coordinated on one side by the N-donor imidazole linker, while the other three available coordination sites are fully occupied by the O atoms from the capping dimethylcarbamates. The chirality of the chain extends along the c axis, generating a rather long 52.470 (11) cell axis. Interestingly, the chiral material crystallizes from completely achiral precursors. A twofold axis and 31 screw axis serve to generate the long asymmetric unit.
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