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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 9824 matches for " Patrick Maywood "
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Measles transmission in health care waiting rooms: implications for public health response
Kirsty Hope,Rowena Boyd,Stephen Conaty,Patrick Maywood
Western Pacific Surveillance and Response , 2012,
Abstract: Background: Seventeen cases of locally acquired measles occurred in South Western Sydney and Sydney local health districts between July and October 2011. Three of the cases were known to have at least one dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Seven cases were infected within a health care setting waiting room by five index cases. Current national protocols require follow-up of all susceptible contacts in the same waiting room for any length of time for up to two hours after the index case has left.Methods: Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Information included: demographics, illness and activities during the exposure and infectious periods. Health care settings provided arrival and discharge times, maps of floor layouts and location of patients during stay.Results: All health care setting transmission occurred in cases who were present at the same time as their index cases, with cross-over time ranging from 20 to 254 minutes. No index case was isolated. Index cases were between day four and six of illness when transmission occurred. None of the five index cases and one of seven secondary cases had received at least one dose of MMR vaccine. Of the seven secondary cases, two were one year of age, one was 17 years old and four were between 30 and 39 years old.Conclusion: As Australia moves towards measles elimination, follow-up of cases is important; however, with limited public health resources a targeted response is vital. In this small but well-documented series of secondary cases acquired in a health care setting, all were infected following direct, proximate contact of at least 20 minutes. Changes to the national guidelines may be warranted, ensuring that limited resources are focused on following up contacts at greatest risk of disease.
Regulation of alternative splicing by the circadian clock and food related cues
Nicholas J McGlincy, Amandine Valomon, Johanna E Chesham, Elizabeth S Maywood, Michael H Hastings, Jernej Ule
Genome Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2012-13-6-r54
Abstract: Using Affymetrix mouse exon-arrays, we identified exons with circadian alternative splicing in the liver. Validated circadian exons were regulated in a tissue-dependent manner and were present in genes with circadian transcript abundance. Furthermore, an analysis of circadian mutant Vipr2-/- mice revealed the existence of distinct physiological pathways controlling circadian alternative splicing and RNA binding protein expression, with contrasting dependence on Vipr2-mediated physiological signals. This view was corroborated by the analysis of the effect of fasting on circadian alternative splicing. Feeding is an important circadian stimulus, and we found that fasting both modulates hepatic circadian alternative splicing in an exon-dependent manner and changes the temporal relationship with transcript-level expression.The circadian clock regulates alternative splicing in a manner that is both tissue-dependent and concurrent with circadian transcript abundance. This adds a novel temporal dimension to the regulation of mammalian alternative splicing. Moreover, our results demonstrate that circadian alternative splicing is regulated by the interaction between distinct physiological cues, and illustrates the capability of single genes to integrate circadian signals at different levels of regulation.Alternative splicing is of particular interest amongst the post-transcriptional processes that regulate gene expression. Through effecting the production of mRNA isoforms with different exonic composition from a single gene, alternative splicing significantly increases the functional and regulatory diversity encoded by the genome. The Drosophila gene Dscam exemplifies this. Dscam contains 95 alternative cassette exons, corresponding to different portions of the Dscam receptor. Through combinatorial use of these exons, the Dscam gene has the potential to encode 38,016 distinct isoforms [1]. This vast isoform diversity provides the molecular basis for neurite self-avoidance dur
Ego Depletion and the Humean Theory of Motivation  [PDF]
Patrick Fleming
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2014.43042
Abstract:

By what capacities do human beings engage in intentional action? Humeans about motivation claim that the source of all action is desire. Volitionalists claim that action has two distinct sources, one in the will and one in desire. Recent work suggests that volitionalism has some empirical support. Roy F. Baumeister and colleagues have argued for a phenomenon called “ego depletion”. They argue that some aspect of the self exerts volition in a number of different contexts. The main evidence for this claim is that experimental subjects who engage in acts of self-regulation are less likely to engage in similar actions on later tests. The evidence calls for a reformulation of the Humean theory, not a rejection of it. And the reformulation is one that still has interest for metaethics. Many philosophers are interested in the Humean theory of motivation because they believe that it has implications for the correct theory of normative practical reasons. Here I argue that if the Humean theory of motivation was ever a threat to the objectivity of morality, it still is.

Letter to Editor  [PDF]
Patrick Velte
Open Journal of Business and Management (OJBM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojbm.2014.21001
Abstract: Letter to Editor
Rain Attenuation Effects on 2.6 GHz WiMAX Networks Deployment in Ghana  [PDF]
Patrick Fiati
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2015.33009
Abstract: WiMAX communication systems operating at 2.6 G frequencies are used for broadband multimedia and internet based services. At these frequencies, the signal will be affected by various propagation impairments such as rain attenuation, cloud attenuation, tropospheric scintillation, ionospheric scintillation, water vapour attenuation, and rain and ice depolarization. Among all the pro-pagation impairments, rain attenuation is the most important and critical parameter. In this research, rain attenuation is calculated at KNUST, Kumasi using ITU-R rain attenuation model. The preliminary results of the work will be used to calculate the attenuation experimentally and comparison can be made, which helps to develop a new rain attenuation model at 2.6 G bands. Rain attenuation is an important aspect of signal propagation above 2.6 GHz frequency. The attenuation time series generation from point rain rate measurement is crucial due to unavailability of actual signal measurements. In this research, a simple and realistic approach has been demonstrated for better estimation of rain attenuation using WiMAX-band signal propagation data and ground rain rate measurements in Ghana. The ITU-R model of rain attenuation has been modified by incorporating an effective slant path model. The effective slant path has been estimated and modeled in terms of a power-law relationship of rain rate data of 2007-2008. The methodology has been validated with the measured data of 2014. Comparison with ITU-R and GMET clearly demonstrates the improved predictability of the proposed model at the present tropical location.
RapidSCAT Sigma-0 and Tb Measurements Validation  [PDF]
Patrick Fiati
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2016.42017
Abstract: Scatterometer Radar Backscatter Calibration since the first SeaSat-A Satellite Scatterometer (Birer et al., 1982), the Amazon tropical rain forest has been recognized as a spatially large extent, homogeneous radar calibration target. During the commissioning of NSCAT (1996) and later QuikSCAT (1999), CFRSL worked with the JPL Scatterometer Cal/Val team to perform normalized radar cross section (Sigma-0) calibrations using the Amazon (see Zec et al., 1999-A and 1999-B) [1]. It is important to continue this activity using RapidSCAT to validate the Sigma-0 measurement provided in the L-1A data product, and moreover the time series of these backscatter observations can be used to establish an improved Ku-band Amazon calibration site for future on-orbit radar calibration [2]. Unfortunately, the Amazon radar backscatter (Sigma-0) exhibits a time of day dependence that is not well characterized, and for the sun-synchronous polar orbiting satellites (SeaSat-A, ADEOS-I and QuikSCAT), the observations occur at specific times of day, during the morning and night passes. But now with the low-earth-orbit of the ISS, there will be an orderly orbit precession, which allows the region to be uniformly sampled over the 24-hour period [3]. Also, since the RapidSCAT employs a conical scanning geometry, we can examine the isotropic nature of Amazon backscatter established by Zec’s (1998-A) analysis of NSCAT and later (1999-B) of QuikSCAT observations [4]. Thus, observations, collected over the RapidSCAT two-year mission will sample the Amazon with high spatial/temporal resolution, as a function of time of day, and over seasons. We propose to analyze these data to develop a high spatial resolution Sigma-0 Amazon map that can be used by future satellite radar missions.
Re-Assembled Botulinum Neurotoxin Inhibits CNS Functions without Systemic Toxicity
Enrico Ferrari,Elizabeth S. Maywood,Laura Restani,Matteo Caleo,Marco Pirazzini,Ornella Rossetto,Michael H. Hastings,Dhevahi Niranjan,Giampietro Schiavo,Bazbek Davletov
Toxins , 2011, DOI: 10.3390/toxins3040345
Abstract: The therapeutic potential of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) has recently been widely recognized. BoNT/A acts to silence synaptic transmission via specific proteolytic cleavage of an essential neuronal protein, SNAP25. The advantages of BoNT/A-mediated synaptic silencing include very long duration, high potency and localized action. However, there is a fear of possible side-effects of BoNT/A due to its diffusible nature which may lead to neuromuscular blockade away from the injection site. We recently developed a “protein-stapling” technology which allows re-assembly of BoNT/A from two separate fragments. This technology allowed, for the first time, safe production of this popular neuronal silencing agent. Here we evaluated the re-assembled toxin in several CNS assays and assessed its systemic effects in an animal model. Our results show that the re-assembled toxin is potent in inhibiting CNS function at 1 nM concentration but surprisingly does not exhibit systemic toxicity after intraperitoneal injection even at 200 ng/kg dose. This shows that the re-assembled toxin represents a uniquely safe tool for neuroscience research and future medical applications.
Association between Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Knowledge and Lifestyle  [PDF]
Patrick Mullie, Peter Clarys
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2011.210140
Abstract: Objective: To relate cardiovascular risk factor knowledge to lifestyle. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, food consumption and lifestyle characteristics were recorded using mailed questionnaires. The dietary pattern was described using the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS). An open ended questionnaire without predefined choices or answers was used to capture cardiovascular knowledge. Results: Lack of physical activity, smoking and eating too much fat were the 3 most cited potential cardiovascular risk factors, while being overweight, eating too much salt and a low consumption of fruits and vegetables were the least cited risk factors. Age, Body Mass Index, physical activity, smoking, income and dietary habits were not consistently associated with knowledge of risk factors. A low socioeconomic position as measured by the indicator education was associated with a lower knowledge of established and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions: Risk factor knowledge, an essential step in prevention of CVD, is not systematically associated with a healthier lifestyle. The findings of this study confirm that there is a gap between risk factor knowledge and lifestyle.
Site Specific Uncertainty in Regional Haze RuleHaze Indexes  [PDF]
Patrick A. Ryan
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (ACS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/acs.2012.21001
Abstract: In 1999, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the regional haze rule (RHR). The RHR default implementation plan calls for each class I area 20% worst baseline (2000-2004) visibility to improve linearly in time to natural conditions in 2064 and in calendar year 2018, each class I area 20% worst visibility is to comply with the 2018 visibility that falls on the linear improvement glide path from baseline (2000-2004) to natural (2064) conditions. This study shows that accurately assessing compliance depends on assessing the uncertainty in baseline, natural and 2018 visibility estimates. This study identifies ±3 dV and ±4 dV of uncertainty in 20% worst natural and baseline visibility estimates. The percent uncertainty in calculated 2018 glide path visibility values ranges from 10% - 45%.
Leaf Wand for Measuring Chlorophyll Fluorescence on Cylindrical Leaves and Its Application on Juncus roemerianus (Black Needlerush)  [PDF]
Patrick D. Biber
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2012.31007
Abstract: Chlorophyll fluorescence is a well established technique to rapidly and non-invasively determine photosynthesis parameters in plant leaves. It can be used in both laboratory and field settings, and frequently dark-adaptation of a leaf sample is called for. In the field, this can be accomplished on flat leaves using standard leaf clips supplied by instrument manufacturers. However, not all plant leaves are flat, many are cylindrical or otherwise three-dimensional in shape. The standard leaf clip does not close fully on three-dimensional leaves, therefore, does not allow the sample to be properly dark adapted in the field. A new leaf “wand” was developed that can be slipped over an entire cylindrical leaf or culm of rushes and sedges for both light- and dark-adapted measurements. This new leaf wand is compared to the standard leaf clip (DLC-8) using a Walz mini-PAM on Juncus roemerianus(Black needlerush). Results indicate that dark-adapted yield measurements are not significantly different between leaf clips, while light-adapted yields are higher with the leaf wand. The potential sources of difference in the optical path of the excitation light and fluorescence return are discussed and compared between leaf clips. Construction of specialized leaf wands should be considered for any leaves are not flat and therefore that do not fit the standard leaf clip for complete dark-adaptation under field conditions.
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