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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 9793 matches for " Patrick Grootaert "
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The fast-running flies (Diptera, Hybotidae, Tachydromiinae) of Singapore and adjacent regions
Patrick Grootaert,Igor V. Shamshev
European Journal of Taxonomy , 2012, DOI: 10.5852/ejt.2011.5
Abstract: This is the first comprehensive introduction to the flies of the subfamily Tachydromiinae (Hybotidae) of Singapore. The monograph summarizes all publications on the Tachydromiinae of Singapore and includes new data resulting from mass-trapping surveys made in Singapore during the last six years. A few samples from Malaysia (Johor province, Pulau Tioman and Langkawi) have been also included in this study. In Singapore the Tachydromiinae are the most diverse group of Empidoidea (except Dolichopodidae) and currently comprise 85 species belonging to the following nine genera: Platypalpus (1), Tachydromia (1), Chersodromia (6), Pontodromia (1), Drapetis (5), Elaphropeza (60), Crossopalpus (1), Nanodromia (3) and Stilpon (7). All species are diagnosed and illustrated. The following 28 species are described as new for science: Chersodromia bulohensis sp. nov. (Singapore), C. glandula sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia), C. malaysiana sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia), C. pasir sp. nov. (Malaysia), C. sylvicola sp. nov. (Singapore), C. tiomanensis sp. nov. (Malaysia), Crossopalpus temasek sp. nov. (Singapore), Drapetis bakau sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia), D. hutan sp. nov. (Singapore), D. laut sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia), D. mandai sp. nov. (Singapore), D. pantai sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia), Elaphropeza chanae sp. nov. (Singapore), E. collini sp. nov. (Singapore), E. gohae sp. nov. (Singapore), E. kranjiensis sp. nov. (Singapore), E. lowi sp. nov. (Singapore), E. semakau sp. nov. (Singapore), E. shufenae sp. nov. (Singapore), Nanodromia hutan sp. nov. (Singapore), N. spinulosa sp. nov. (Singapore), Platypalpus singaporensis sp. nov. (Singapore), Pontodromia pantai sp. nov. (Singapore), Stilpon arcuatum sp. nov. (Singapore), S. neesoonensis sp. nov. (Singapore), S. nigripennis sp. nov. (Singapore), S. singaporensis sp. nov. (Singapore), S. weilingae sp. nov. (Singapore). A redescription is given for Crossopalpus exul (Osten-Sacken, 1882) (Taiwan). Males of Elaphropeza feminata Shamshev & Grootaert, 2007 and E. modesta Shamshev & Grootaert, 2007 as well as females of Elaphropeza ubinensis Shamshev & Grootaert, 2007 and Nanodromia narmkroi Grootaert & Shamshev, 2003 are described for the first time. Keys to genera and species, which are generally applicable to the whole of Southeast Asia, are compiled. An analysis of the species ecological preferenda is presented.
Ego Depletion and the Humean Theory of Motivation  [PDF]
Patrick Fleming
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2014.43042
Abstract:

By what capacities do human beings engage in intentional action? Humeans about motivation claim that the source of all action is desire. Volitionalists claim that action has two distinct sources, one in the will and one in desire. Recent work suggests that volitionalism has some empirical support. Roy F. Baumeister and colleagues have argued for a phenomenon called “ego depletion”. They argue that some aspect of the self exerts volition in a number of different contexts. The main evidence for this claim is that experimental subjects who engage in acts of self-regulation are less likely to engage in similar actions on later tests. The evidence calls for a reformulation of the Humean theory, not a rejection of it. And the reformulation is one that still has interest for metaethics. Many philosophers are interested in the Humean theory of motivation because they believe that it has implications for the correct theory of normative practical reasons. Here I argue that if the Humean theory of motivation was ever a threat to the objectivity of morality, it still is.

Letter to Editor  [PDF]
Patrick Velte
Open Journal of Business and Management (OJBM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojbm.2014.21001
Abstract: Letter to Editor
Rain Attenuation Effects on 2.6 GHz WiMAX Networks Deployment in Ghana  [PDF]
Patrick Fiati
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2015.33009
Abstract: WiMAX communication systems operating at 2.6 G frequencies are used for broadband multimedia and internet based services. At these frequencies, the signal will be affected by various propagation impairments such as rain attenuation, cloud attenuation, tropospheric scintillation, ionospheric scintillation, water vapour attenuation, and rain and ice depolarization. Among all the pro-pagation impairments, rain attenuation is the most important and critical parameter. In this research, rain attenuation is calculated at KNUST, Kumasi using ITU-R rain attenuation model. The preliminary results of the work will be used to calculate the attenuation experimentally and comparison can be made, which helps to develop a new rain attenuation model at 2.6 G bands. Rain attenuation is an important aspect of signal propagation above 2.6 GHz frequency. The attenuation time series generation from point rain rate measurement is crucial due to unavailability of actual signal measurements. In this research, a simple and realistic approach has been demonstrated for better estimation of rain attenuation using WiMAX-band signal propagation data and ground rain rate measurements in Ghana. The ITU-R model of rain attenuation has been modified by incorporating an effective slant path model. The effective slant path has been estimated and modeled in terms of a power-law relationship of rain rate data of 2007-2008. The methodology has been validated with the measured data of 2014. Comparison with ITU-R and GMET clearly demonstrates the improved predictability of the proposed model at the present tropical location.
Association between Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Knowledge and Lifestyle  [PDF]
Patrick Mullie, Peter Clarys
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2011.210140
Abstract: Objective: To relate cardiovascular risk factor knowledge to lifestyle. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, food consumption and lifestyle characteristics were recorded using mailed questionnaires. The dietary pattern was described using the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS). An open ended questionnaire without predefined choices or answers was used to capture cardiovascular knowledge. Results: Lack of physical activity, smoking and eating too much fat were the 3 most cited potential cardiovascular risk factors, while being overweight, eating too much salt and a low consumption of fruits and vegetables were the least cited risk factors. Age, Body Mass Index, physical activity, smoking, income and dietary habits were not consistently associated with knowledge of risk factors. A low socioeconomic position as measured by the indicator education was associated with a lower knowledge of established and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions: Risk factor knowledge, an essential step in prevention of CVD, is not systematically associated with a healthier lifestyle. The findings of this study confirm that there is a gap between risk factor knowledge and lifestyle.
Site Specific Uncertainty in Regional Haze RuleHaze Indexes  [PDF]
Patrick A. Ryan
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (ACS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/acs.2012.21001
Abstract: In 1999, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the regional haze rule (RHR). The RHR default implementation plan calls for each class I area 20% worst baseline (2000-2004) visibility to improve linearly in time to natural conditions in 2064 and in calendar year 2018, each class I area 20% worst visibility is to comply with the 2018 visibility that falls on the linear improvement glide path from baseline (2000-2004) to natural (2064) conditions. This study shows that accurately assessing compliance depends on assessing the uncertainty in baseline, natural and 2018 visibility estimates. This study identifies ±3 dV and ±4 dV of uncertainty in 20% worst natural and baseline visibility estimates. The percent uncertainty in calculated 2018 glide path visibility values ranges from 10% - 45%.
Leaf Wand for Measuring Chlorophyll Fluorescence on Cylindrical Leaves and Its Application on Juncus roemerianus (Black Needlerush)  [PDF]
Patrick D. Biber
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2012.31007
Abstract: Chlorophyll fluorescence is a well established technique to rapidly and non-invasively determine photosynthesis parameters in plant leaves. It can be used in both laboratory and field settings, and frequently dark-adaptation of a leaf sample is called for. In the field, this can be accomplished on flat leaves using standard leaf clips supplied by instrument manufacturers. However, not all plant leaves are flat, many are cylindrical or otherwise three-dimensional in shape. The standard leaf clip does not close fully on three-dimensional leaves, therefore, does not allow the sample to be properly dark adapted in the field. A new leaf “wand” was developed that can be slipped over an entire cylindrical leaf or culm of rushes and sedges for both light- and dark-adapted measurements. This new leaf wand is compared to the standard leaf clip (DLC-8) using a Walz mini-PAM on Juncus roemerianus(Black needlerush). Results indicate that dark-adapted yield measurements are not significantly different between leaf clips, while light-adapted yields are higher with the leaf wand. The potential sources of difference in the optical path of the excitation light and fluorescence return are discussed and compared between leaf clips. Construction of specialized leaf wands should be considered for any leaves are not flat and therefore that do not fit the standard leaf clip for complete dark-adaptation under field conditions.
Limited Re-Sequencing for Mixed-Models with Multiple Objectives, Part II: A Permutation Approach  [PDF]
Patrick R. McMullen
American Journal of Operations Research (AJOR) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajor.2012.21002
Abstract: This research presents an approach to solving the limited re-sequencing problem for a JIT system when two objectives are considered for multiple processes. One objective is to minimize the number of setups; the other is to minimize the material usage rate [1]. For this research effort, each unique permutation of the problem’s demand structure is noted, and used as a mechanism for finding subsequent sequences. Two variants of this permutation approach are used: one employs a Monte-Carlo simulation, while the other employs a modification of Ant-Colony Optimization to find sequences satisfying the objectives of interest. Problem sets from the literature are used for assessment, and experimentation shows that the methodology presented here outperforms methodology from an earlier research effort [3].
Limited Resequencing for Mixed Models with Multiple Objectives  [PDF]
Patrick R. McMullen
American Journal of Operations Research (AJOR) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ajor.2011.14025
Abstract: This research presents a problem relevant to production scheduling for mixed models – production schedules that contain several unique items, but each unique item may have multiple units that require processing. The presented research details a variant of this problem where, over multiple processes, resequencing is permitted to a small degree so as to exploit efficiencies with the intent of optimizing the objectives of required set-ups and parts usage rate via an efficient frontier. The problem is combinatorial in nature. Enumeration is used on a variety of test problems from the literature, and a search heuristic is used to compare optimal solutions with heuristic based solutions. Experimentation shows that the heuristic solutions approach optimality, but with opportunities for improvement.
Nut Consumption Is Associated with a Healthy Dietary Pattern in Military Men  [PDF]
Patrick Mullie, Peter Clarys
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2012.38139
Abstract: The objective of the research was to determine the relation between nut consumption and dietary patterns described by Healthy Eating Index, Mediterranean Diet Score and principal component analysis. In a cross-sectional study, 1852 military men were contacted by mail. Using food-frequency questionnaires, nut consumption was recorded and stratified in weekly versus less than weekly. Three dietary indices were calculated and stratified in quintiles. For principal component analysis, the healthiest dietary pattern rich in fruits and vegetables was selected as Healthy Dietary Pattern. The highest quintiles of Healthy Eating Index, Mediterranean Diet Score and Healthy Dietary Pattern were systematically associated with the highest weekly consumption of nuts. The highest quintiles were also associated with the lowest intake of saturated fat, i.e. between 10 and 12 energy-percent compared with 17 to 19 energy-percent for the lowest quintiles. The mean daily nut consumption was less than 6 g a day, which is beneath the recommended quantity for cardiovascular protection. Nut consumption was associated with the healthiest dietary pattern, independently of the used method to determine the dietary pattern. Regular nut consumption seems to be a component of a cluster of several healthy behaviors.
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