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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2506 matches for " Pamela Burton "
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Genomic Data Reveal Toxoplasma gondii Differentiation Mutants Are Also Impaired with Respect to Switching into a Novel Extracellular Tachyzoite State
Pamela J. Lescault,Ann B. Thompson,Veerupaxagouda Patil,Dario Lirussi,Amanda Burton,Juan Margarit,Jeffrey Bond,Mariana Matrajt
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014463
Abstract: Toxoplasma gondii pathogenesis includes the invasion of host cells by extracellular parasites, replication of intracellular tachyzoites, and differentiation to a latent bradyzoite stage. We present the analysis of seven novel T. gondii insertional mutants that do not undergo normal differentiation to bradyzoites. Microarray quantification of the variation in genome-wide RNA levels for each parasite line and times after induction allowed us to describe states in the normal differentiation process, to analyze mutant lines in the context of these states, and to identify genes that may have roles in initiating the transition from tachyzoite to bradyzoite. Gene expression patterns in wild-type parasites undergoing differentiation suggest a novel extracellular state within the tachyzoite stage. All mutant lines exhibit aberrant regulation of bradyzoite gene expression and notably some of the mutant lines appear to exhibit high proportions of the intracellular tachyzoite state regardless of whether they are intracellular or extracellular. In addition to the genes identified by the insertional mutagenesis screen, mixture model analysis allowed us to identify a small number of genes, in mutants, for which expression patterns could not be accounted for using the three parasite states – genes that may play a mechanistic role in switching from the tachyzoite to bradyzoite stage.
Using Self-Efficacy to Assess the Readiness of Nursing Educators and Students for Mobile Learning
Richard F. Kenny Caroline L. Park,Jocelyne M. C. Van Neste-Kenny,Pamela Burton,Caroline L. Park
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning , 2012,
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess the self-efficacy of nursing faculty and students related to their potential use of mobile technology and to ask what implications this technology has for their teaching and learning in practice education contexts. We used a cross-sectional survey design involving students and faculty in two nursing education programs in a western Canadian college. In January, 2011, 121 faculty members and students completed the survey. Results showed a high level of ownership and use of mobile devices among our respondents. The median mobile self-efficacy score was 75 on a scale of 100, indicating that both faculty and students were highly confident in their use of mobile technologies and prepared to engage in mobile learning.
A 61-Year-Old Man with Dyspepsia and Weight Loss
Catherine Burton
PLOS Medicine , 2005, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020154
Abstract:
Heavy Tailed Distributions of Effect Sizes in Systematic Reviews of Complex Interventions
Christopher Burton
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034222
Abstract: Background Systematic reviews of complex interventions commonly find heterogeneity of effect sizes among similar interventions which cannot be explained. Commentators have suggested that complex interventions should be viewed as interventions in complex systems. We hypothesised that if this is the case, the distribution of effect sizes from complex interventions should be heavy tailed, as in other complex systems. Thus, apparent heterogeneity may be a feature of the complex systems in which such interventions operate. Methodology/Principal Findings We specified three levels of complexity and identified systematic reviews which reported effect sizes of healthcare interventions at two of these levels (interventions to change professional practice and personal interventions to help smoking cessation). These were compared with each other and with simulated data representing the lowest level of complexity. Effect size data were rescaled across reviews at each level using log-normal parameters and pooled. Distributions were plotted and fitted against the inverse power law (Pareto) and stretched exponential (Weibull) distributions, heavy tailed distributions which are commonly reported in the literature, using maximum likelihood fitting. The dataset included 155 studies of interventions to change practice and 98 studies of helping smoking cessation. Both distributions showed a heavy tailed distribution which fitted best to the inverse power law for practice interventions (exponent = 3.9, loglikelihood = ?35.3) and to the stretched exponential for smoking cessation (loglikelihood = ?75.2). Bootstrap sensitivity analysis to adjust for possible publication bias against weak results did not diminish the goodness of fit. Conclusions/Significance The distribution of effect sizes from complex interventions includes heavy tails as typically seen in both theoretical and empirical complex systems. This is in keeping with the idea of complex interventions as interventions in complex systems.
HIV, refugees and conflict-affected populations in Asia
Ann Burton
Forced Migration Review , 2010,
Abstract: Evidence-based experience, good assessment and a readiness to adapt programmes to local realities have been key to tackling HIV in Asia.
A 61-year-old man with dyspepsia and weight loss.
Burton Catherine
PLOS Medicine , 2005,
Abstract:
Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction
Deirdre Burton
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir -Whorl hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio -linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change. In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir -Whorl hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio -linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change.
Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction
Deirdre Burton
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio-linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change. In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio-linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change.
Anatomía de la melancolía (1621).
Robert Burton
Revista de la Asociación Espa?ola de Neuropsiquiatría , 1995,
Abstract: Sin resumen.
HIV-associated pulmonary hypertension: A South African perspective
Burton Rosie
PVRI Review , 2010,
Abstract:
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