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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 860 matches for " PS; Font "
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Componentes principales como fenotipos de sistemas biológicos complejos: Relación músculo-hueso en el ratón (Mus musculus)
Di Masso,RJ; Pippa,C; Silva,PS; Font,MT;
BAG. Journal of basic and applied genetics , 2010,
Abstract: principal components analysis classifies the phenotypic variation of a population into independent systems of correlated traits. it has been postulated that principal components can be used to identify genetic networks involved in regulating complex biological systems as each individual in the population has values which may be associated with phenotypes susceptible to be analyzed genetically. the technique was applied to fi ve traits involved in muscle-bone relationship (pesmus: gastrocnemius muscle weight; pestib and pesfem: weight of tibia and femur, and lonfem and lontib: length of femur and tibia) measured at 150 days of age in males (n = 336) and females (n = 319) of a segregating population (f2) of mice derived from crossing two lines selected for body conformation. the three first principal components explained almost the same proportion of the total variance (87%) in males and females. the first component (pc1) explained 60% of the generalized variance and was negatively associated with the fi ve muscle-bone indicators, so it may be considered as an indicator of body size. the second component (pc2) explained 15% of the total variance and was associated with bone length with little effect on bone weight and muscle weight so it can be interpreted as an indicator of skeleton length. the third component explained 12% of the variance and was associated with muscle weight, with little effect on bone weight and no effect on bone length, so it can be interpreted as an indicator of the biomass sustained. the results indicate the coexistence of independent sources of phenotypic variance in the characterization of this complex biological system that allow to identify particular combinations of the triad -body size, skeleton as a scaffold for soft tissues and biomass sustained.
Public Sector Reforms In Africa: A Philosophical Re-Thinking
PS Omoyefa
Africa Development , 2008,
Abstract: Public sector reform (PSR) has been quite popular in African. However, the inadequate understanding of the philosophical basis of the reforms has led to many African countries to equating PSR with privatization and commercialization of public enterprises, downsizing of the public service workforce and the war on corruption. While many African countries are pursuing with the necessary vigour these policies, which were induced by former colonial masters and so-called development agencies, there has been little or no success as compared with the pre-PSR era. The aim of this paper is to bring out, in clear terms, the fact that the present PSR cannot achieve success because of the threat of sustaining continued control of the African economies and policies by the Breton Woods institutions, the sale of public enterprises to multinational companies, the migration of the best African brains to Europe and America, corruption and neo-colonialism. In essence, this paper advocates a philosophical re-thinking of PSR. This will start with reforming the minds of African leaders to reform the body politic. This study shows that PSR in Africa that fail to take note of the ethical and communal values and peculiar situations of various African countries will definitely fail.
The development of new generation of solid waste refuse incinerators
PS Kwawukume
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) , 2006,
Abstract: The use of bricks in the construction of new generation of incinerators has proved adequate in clearing large unplanned dumps of refuse in both cities and rural areas of Ghana. These incinerators have been moulded to attain very high temperatures with excellent heat preservation capabilities that no more auxiliary fuel is needed after the initial start up. The heat retention is so high that it allows incineration of subsequent rubbish. Results indicate total destruction capability of wet to dry rubbish into their mineral constituents. The design of these incinerators does not allow combustion products directly into the atmosphere as was in the case of the older ones and with available excess air the organic components of waste are turned in to ashes and the non organics such as tins, cans, bottles perish and eventually fall through the grates and crumble in the high heat of the incinerator. The mode of feeding the Incinerator by the use of wheelbarrows on an inclined plane proved more adequate than the use of steps.
Development of gas boy medical incinerator as a substitute for placenta pits in hospitals in Ghana
PS Kwawukume
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) , 2005,
Abstract: A high temperature medical incinerator of 0.4cu m capacity was designed and built with specially manufactured refractory bricks and high temperature bauxite mortars with local gas burners rated at 158Kilojoules(150 B.T.U.) High pressure regulators were fitted onto the 52kg gas cylinders to enable the delivery of high gas pressure to the burners for quick combustion. The stench that emanates from the burial of placentas, limbs etc especially after rainfall, are unbearable and awful within most hospital environments. A solution has been found in the engineering of all-in-one medical gas boy incinerator with quick rise in temperature and even distribution of heat, with drying and firing cycles and can be recharged at elevated temperatures. Steady states of heat transmission through the multi-layer wall of the incinerator was calculated which shows low escape of heat through the walls thereby enhancing maximum heat retention which is available in reducing the medical wastes into their mineral constituents which are essentially stench free ashes. Journal of Science and Technology Vol. 25(2) 2005: 137-142
Prescription painkillers and controlled substances: an appraisal of drug information provided by six US pharmacies
Gill PS
Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DHPS.S42508
Abstract: escription painkillers and controlled substances: an appraisal of drug information provided by six US pharmacies Original Research (493) Total Article Views Authors: Gill PS Published Date February 2013 Volume 2013:5 Pages 29 - 36 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DHPS.S42508 Received: 08 January 2013 Accepted: 25 January 2013 Published: 27 February 2013 Preetinder S Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Health literacy impacts health outcomes. Health literacy is a measure of a person's competence to find, access, contextualize, and understand the information needed to make health decisions. Low levels of health literacy have been associated with poor health status. Health literacy can be enhanced by improving the readability of health literature. Misuse and abuse of prescription medicines and controlled substances is rising. It could be argued that improving the readability of the drug-information documents associated with these medicines could serve to alleviate this situation in a small, albeit incremental, manner. This paper provides a readability assessment of 71 such documents. Methods: The readability of drug-information documents associated with 12 commonly misused and abused painkiller medicines and controlled substances published by the top six US pharmacies was assessed. The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) indices were used to assess the readability of these drug-information documents. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the readability of the documents. Results: The average Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level index score was found to be 11.16. The average Flesch Reading Ease index score was found to be 45.94. The average SMOG index score was found to be 13.60. Pharmacies C and E had the best average readability scores, whereas pharmacies A and B had the worst average readability scores. Conclusion: Access, contents, and formatting of the documents were qualitatively analyzed to make recommendations to improve readability. Pharmacies C and E were used as benchmarks to identify the seven best practices. Good drug-information documents should have: (1) clear purpose, (2) limited scope, (3) summary/brief review, (4) well-placed graphics, (5) informative illustrations, (6) clean layout and lucid formatting relevant to the media, and (7) focus on the intended users.
Technological innovation and its effect on public health in the United States
Gill PS
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S34810
Abstract: hnological innovation and its effect on public health in the United States Original Research (1015) Total Article Views Authors: Gill PS Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 31 - 40 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S34810 Received: 08 June 2012 Accepted: 18 December 2012 Published: 23 January 2013 Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Good public health ensures an efficient work force. Organizations can ensure a prominent position on the global stage by staying on the leading edge of technological development. Public health and technological innovation are vital elements of prosperous economies. It is important to understand how these elements affect each other. This research study explored and described the relationship between these two critical elements/constructs. Methods: Indicators representing technological innovation and public health were identified. Indicator data from 2000 to 2009 were collected from various US federal government sources, for the four US Census regions. The four US Census regions were then compared in terms of these indicators. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations of the indicators that are strongly related to each other. Additionally, the cause–effect relationship between public health and technological innovation was described using the structural equation modeling technique. Results: The four US Census regions ranked differently in terms of both type of indicators in a statistically significant manner. The canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, with a magnitude > 0.65 at the 95% confidence interval, for all census regions. Structural equation modeling analysis provided β < 0.69 and Student’s t statistic > 12.98, for all census regions. The threshold Student’s t statistic was 1.98. Hence, it was found that the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval, for all census regions. Discussion: The results of the study showed that better technological innovation indicator scores were associated with better public health indicator scores. Furthermore, the study provided preliminary evidence that technological innovation shares causal relation with public health.
Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic
Gill PS
International Journal of General Medicine , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S42226
Abstract: tient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic Original Research (498) Total Article Views Authors: Gill PS Published Date March 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 85 - 98 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S42226 Received: 01 January 2013 Accepted: 21 January 2013 Published: 04 March 2013 Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes.
On a never-ending waiting list: Toward equitable access to antiretroviral treatment? Experiences from Zambia
PS Jones
Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: Universal access to antiretroviral (ARV) medication for HIV/AIDS is the clarion call of the WHO/UNAIDS 3 by 5 Initiative. Treatment coverage, however, remains highly uneven. This sharpens the question of who exactly is accessing ARVs and whether access is challenging inequality or reinforcing it. Issues of distributive justice have long been debated in health policy, but the practical challenges of ARV distribution are relatively new. In exploring what a more equitable process of ARV distribution could involve, this article draws on a human rights framework using case study material from Zambia. Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine Vol. 7 (4) 2006: pp. 26-36
Bambatha at Mpanza: The making of a rebel
PS Thompson
Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies , 2004,
Abstract:
Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic
Gill PS
International Journal of General Medicine , 2013,
Abstract: Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. Keywords: patient engagement, health outcomes, communication, provider effectiveness, patient incentive
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