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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 201370 matches for " P Subramanian "
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SJKDT: The Need for a Cumulative Index
Subramanian P
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2000,
Abstract:
Osteodystrophy in chronic Renal Failure
Subramanian P
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 1999,
Abstract:
Salt and hypertension in Man
Subramanian P
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 1999,
Abstract:
Immunoglobulin IgA Nephrology
Subramanian P
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 1999,
Abstract:
Economic Design of Three-Phase Induction Motor by Particle Swarm Optimization  [PDF]
Vadugapalayam P. Sakthivel, Ramachandran Bhuvaneswari, Srikrishna Subramanian
Journal of Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications (JEMAA) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jemaa.2010.25039
Abstract: A Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based design of three-phase induction motors are proposed. The induction motor design is treated as a non-linear and multivariable constrained optimization problem. The annual material cost and the total annual cost of the motor are chosen as two different objective functions. The PSO is used to find a set of optimal design variables of the motor which are then used to predict performance indices and the objective functions. The proposed method is demonstrated for two sample motors, and it is compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) and the conventional design methods. The results show that the PSO-based method effectively solved the induction motor design problems and outperforms the other methods in both the solution quality and computation efficiency.
Preparation of Spent Duck Meat Pickle and its Storage Studies at Room Temperature
P. Kanagaraju,A. Subramanian
American Journal of Food Technology , 2012,
Abstract: Spent duck meat can be profitably utilized by preparing value added meat products. A study was conducted on preparation and storage stability of ready to eat meat product-pickle at room temperature. The storage studies were conducted at an interval of 15 days up to 90 days. The dressing percent, giblet percent, percent meat and bone yield were 53.84, 0.91, 61.22 and 29.92, respectively. Average cooking yield of the pickle was 58.4%. The mean per cent values for moisture, crude protein, ether extract, salt and total ash of the freshly prepared pickle were 33.12, 19.85, 39.86, 2.13 and 3.35, respectively. The Thiobarbuturic acid, free faty acid, peroxide, acid values and total viable count and yeast and mould count did not increase significantly (p<0.05) during the storage at room temperature up to 90 days. The pathogenic bacteria like Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus spp., Clostridium spp. and E.coli were absent in the pickle during the entire storage period. The sensory scores also revealed that the pickle was acceptable even up to 90 days storage. Hence it can be concluded that an acceptable meat pickle with storage stability up to 90 days at room temperature can be prepared from duck hen meat.
Pruritus among End-Stage Renal Failure Patients on Hemodialysis
Jamal Arshad,Subramanian P
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2000,
Abstract: Pruritus is commonly encountered in individuals with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) on dialysis. This study was performed in order to find out the prevalence and pattern of pruritus in patients on regular maintenance hemodialysis (HD) as well as to analyze its relationship to age, sex of the patient, site of itching and timing of hemodialysis. One hundred patients with ESRF (age ranging from 13 to 80 years) free from systemic, skin or psychiatric disorders and other secondary causes attributable to pruritis, undergoing maintenance HD (duration on HD 7-141 months; mean 49.9 and median 43 months) at Samtah General Hospital, Samtah, Gizan, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were evaluated for pruritus on two occasions at one week interval by each author independently. The data were analyzed by simple descriptive statistics viz mean, median and chi-square test. Pruritus was observed in 27 of 40 males (67.5%) and 40 of 60 females (66.7%) with an overall prevalence of 67%. It was mild in 34 (50.8%), moderate in 22 (32.8%) and severe in 11 (16.4%). Sub-group analysis with reference to age and sex revealed that pruritus was significantly more in women aged 45 years and above, when compared with men of similar age-group (p < 0.05) or women below 45 years (p < 0.02). Pruritus was predominant in spinal dermatomes. Discomfort of pruritus was more during HD in three (two men and one woman) and HD gave relief for the day in 10 other individuals (four men and six women). Our study suggests that pruritus is observed in all age-groups and of both sexes of ESRF patients on HD although the intensity and site of itching and relationship to HD sessions varied with individuals.
Bioactive Compost - A Value Added Compost with Microbial Inoculants and Organic Additives
R. Kavitha,P. Subramanian
Journal of Applied Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost through the addition of various substrates, which has multiple benefits to the crop system. The key players in this transformation process were Azotobacter, Pseudomonas, Phosphobacteria, composted poultry litter, rock phosphate and diluted spent wash. This enrichment process has increased the nutritive value of compost. The highest nitrogen content (1.75%) and phosphorus content (1.16%) was observed in the treatment T5 (compost enriched with composted poultry litter, spent wash, microbial inoculants and rock phosphate). The beneficial microorganism viz., Azotobacter, Pseudomonas and Phosphobacteria population were higher in the treatment T5 where all the inputs (composted poultry litter, microbial consortium, rock phosphate and spent wash) were added to the compost. The plant growth promoters viz., IAA and GA content was more in the treatment applied with spent wash and microbial inoculum. Beneficial microorganisms, composted poultry litter, rock phosphate and diluted spent wash contributes maximum level of nutrients and growth promoters to the compost with small expenses.
Effect of Enriched Municipal Solid Waste Compost Application on Growth, Plant Nutrient Uptake and Yield of Rice
R. Kavitha,P. Subramanian
Journal of Agronomy , 2007,
Abstract: A field experiment was conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to study the effect of Enriched Municipal Solid Waste Compost (EMSWC) application on growth, plant nutrient uptake and yield of rice in RBD during the year of 2004. The growth attributes viz., plant height, leaf area index, number of tillers and dry matter production differed significantly due to different treatments. These attributes increased significantly owing to the application of enriched compost, which has enhanced nutrient level, which leads to the continuous availability of nutrients in available form to the plants. The highest grain yield and straw yield were observed in the treatment combination of 25% of enriched compost and 75% of recommended dose of inorganic fertilizer (T5) with value of 5.22 and 8.65 t ha-1, respectively. Application of 5 t ha-1 enriched MSWC in combination with 25% N through inorganic fertilizer recorded grain yield of 4.33 t ha-1. The lowest grain yield (3.78 t ha-1) was recorded in treatment where the compost was applied alone.
Antioxidant Potential of Momordica Charantia in Ammonium Chloride-Induced Hyperammonemic Rats
A. Justin Thenmozhi,P. Subramanian
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1093/ecam/nep227
Abstract: The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant potential of Momordica charantia fruit extract (MCE) in ammonium chloride-induced (AC) hyperammonemic rats. Experimental hyperammonemia was induced in adult male Wistar rats (180–200 g) by intraperitoneal injections of ammonium chloride (100 mg kg−1 body weight) thrice a week. The effect of oral administration (thrice a week for 8 consecutive weeks) of MCE (300 mg kg−1 body weight) on blood ammonia, plasma urea, serum liver marker enzymes and oxidative stress biomarkers in normal and experimental animals was analyzed. Hyperammonemic rats showed a significant increase in the activities of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxides and liver markers (alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase), and the levels of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione were decreased in the liver and brain tissues. Treatment with MCE normalized the above-mentioned changes in hyperammonemic rats by reversing the oxidant-antioxidant imbalance during AC-induced hyperammonemia, and offered protection against hyperammonemia. Our results indicate that MCE exerting the antioxidant potentials and maintaining the cellular integrity of the liver tissue could offer protection against AC-induced hyperammonemia. However, the exact underlying mechanism is yet to be investigated, and examination of the efficacy of the active constituents of the M. charantia on hyperammonemia is desirable.
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