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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 113344 matches for " O. Abe "
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A New Basis Function Approach to 't Hooft Equation
O. Abe
Physics , 2000,
Abstract: We present the new basis functions to investigate the 't Hooft equation, the lowest order mesonic Light-Front Tamm-Dancoff equation for $\rm SU(N_C)$ gauge theories. We find the wave function can be well approximated by new basis functions and obtain an analytic formula for the mass of the lightest bound state. Its value is consistent with the precedent results.
Can a gravitational wave and a magnetic monopole coexist?
O. Abe,O. Tabata
Physics , 1997, DOI: 10.1142/S0217732397003137
Abstract: We investigate the behavior of small perturbations around the Kaluza-Klein monopole in the five dimensional space-time. We find that the even parity gravitational wave does not propagate in the five dimensional space-time with Kaluza-Klein monopole provided that the gravitational wave is constant in the fifth direction. We conclude that a gravitational wave and a U(1) magnetic monopole do not coexist in five dimensional Kaluza-Klein spacetime.
Reply to Nicholson's comment on "Consistent calculation of aquatic gross production from oxygen triple isotope measurements" by Kaiser (2011)
J. Kaiser,O. Abe
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2012,
Abstract: The comment by Nicholson (2011a) questions the "consistency" of the "definition" of the "biological end-member" used by Kaiser (2011a) in the calculation of oxygen gross production. "Biological end-member" refers to the relative oxygen isotope ratio difference between photosynthetic oxygen and Air-O2 (abbreviated 17δP and 18δP for 17O/16O and 18O/16O, respectively). The comment claims that this leads to an overestimate of the discrepancy between previous studies and that the resulting gross production rates are "30% too high". Nicholson recognises the improved accuracy of Kaiser's direct calculation ("dual-delta") method compared to previous approximate approaches based on 17O excess (17Δ) and its simplicity compared to previous iterative calculation methods. Although he correctly points out that differences in the normalised gross production rate (g) are largely due to different input parameters used in Kaiser's "base case" and previous studies, he does not acknowledge Kaiser's observation that iterative and dual-delta calculation methods give exactly the same g for the same input parameters (disregarding kinetic isotope fractionation during air-sea exchange). The comment is based on misunderstandings with respect to the "base case" 17δP and 18δP values. Since direct measurements of 17δP and 18δPdo not exist or have been lost, Kaiser constructed the "base case" in a way that was consistent and compatible with literature data. Nicholson showed that an alternative reconstruction of 17δP gives g values closer to previous studies. However, unlike Nicholson, we refrain from interpreting either reconstruction as a benchmark for the accuracy of g. A number of publications over the last 12 months have tried to establish which of these two reconstructions is more accurate. Nicholson draws on recently revised measurements of the relative 17O/16O difference between VSMOW and Air-O2 (17δVSMOW; Barkan and Luz, 2011), together with new measurements of photosynthetic isotope fractionation, to support his comment. However, our own measurements disagree with these revised 17δVSMOW values. If scaled for differences in 18δVSMOW, they are actually in good agreement with the original data (Barkan and Luz, 2005) and support Kaiser's "base case" g values. The statement that Kaiser's g values are "30% too high" can therefore not be accepted, pending future work to reconcile different 17δVSMOW measurements. Nicholson also suggests that approximated calculations of gross production should be performed with a triple isotope excess defined as 17Δ#≡ ln (1+17δ)–λ ln(1+18δ), with λ = θR = ln(1+17 R ) / ln(1+18 R). However, this only improves the approximation for certain 17δP and 18δP values, for certain net to gross production ratios (f) and for certain ratios of gross production to gross Air-O2 invasion (g). In other cases, the approximated calculation based on 17Δ ≡17δ – κ 18δ with κ = γR = 17 R/18 R (Kaiser, 2011a) gives more accurate results.
Reply to Nicholson's comment on "Consistent calculation of aquatic gross production from oxygen triple isotope measurements" by Kaiser (2011)
J. Kaiser,O. Abe
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2011, DOI: 10.5194/bgd-8-10517-2011
Abstract: The comment by Nicholson (2011a) questions the "consistency" of the "definition" of the "biological end-member" used by Kaiser (2011a) in the calculation of oxygen gross production. "Biological end-member" refers to the relative oxygen isotope ratio difference between photosynthetic oxygen and Air-O2 (abbreviated 17δP and 18δP for 17O/16O and 18O/16O, respectively). This comment has no merit for the following reasons: (a) the isotopic composition of photosynthetic oxygen cannot be "defined", it can only be measured, modelled or calculated based on other data; (b) the isotopic composition of photosynthetic oxygen was not "defined" in Kaiser (2011a), but derived from published measurements; (c) the published measurements themselves were inconsistent and no single result could be identified as best; (d) since no best value could be identified, a hypothetical base case was constructed in a way that was consistent with previous publications; (e) the values of 17δP= 11.646‰ and 18δP= 22.835‰ assumed for the base case are compatible with the experimental evidence published before the paper of Kaiser (2011a); (f) even if the "biological end-member" was based on a definition, there could be no argument about the "consistency" of this definition – as per its nature, a definition is arbitrary. The qualification of base case gross production values as being "30 % too high" must therefore also be rejected. Even though recently revised measurements of the relative 17O/16O isotope ratio difference between VSMOW and Air-O2, 17δVSMOW (Barkan and Luz, 2011), do support lower estimates of gross production, our own measurements disagree with these revised 17δVSMOW values. If scaled for differences in 18δVSMOW, they are actually in good agreement with the original data (Barkan and Luz, 2005). Moreover, species-dependent differences in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (Eisenstadt et al., 2010) correspond to an uncertainty of at least 15 % around the central estimate for the inferred gross production. Nicholson (2011a) also suggests that approximated calculations of gross production should be performed with a triple isotope excess defined as 17Δ#≡ln(1+17δ) λln(1+18δ), with λ=θR=ln(1+17εR)/ln(1+18εR). However, this only improves the approximation for certain 17δP and 18δP values, for certain net to gross production ratios (f) and for certain ratios of gross production to gross Air-O2 invasion (g). In other cases, the approximated calculation based on 17Δ ≡17δ κ18δ with κ=γR=17εR/18εR gives better results.
New Thick Film Functional Devices
Y. Taketa,O. Abe,M. Haradome
Active and Passive Electronic Components , 1981, DOI: 10.1155/apec.8.77
Abstract:
Influence of dynamic vegetation on climate change and terrestrial carbon storage in the Last Glacial Maximum
R. O'ishi,A. Abe-Ouchi
Climate of the Past Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/cpd-8-5787-2012
Abstract: When the climate is reconstructed from paleoevidence, it shows that the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 21 000 yr ago) is cold and dry compared to the present day. Reconstruction also shows that compared to today, the vegetation of the LGM is less active and the distribution of vegetation was drastically different, due to cold temperature, dryness, and a lower level of atmospheric CO2 level (185 ppm compared to a preindustrial level of 285 ppm). In the present paper, we investigate the influence of vegetation change on the climate of the LGM by using a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model (GCM, the MIROC-LPJ). We examined four GCM experiments (LGM and preindustrial, with and without vegetation feedback) and quantified the strength of the vegetation feedback during the LGM. The result shows global-averaged cooling during the LGM is amplified by +13.5% due to the introduction of vegetation feedback. This is mainly caused by the increase of land surface albedo due to the expansion of tundra in northern high latitudes and the desertification in northern middle latitudes around 30° N to 60° N. We also investigated how this change in climate affected the total terrestrial carbon storage by using a separated Lund-Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ-DGVM). Our result shows that the total terrestrial carbon storage was reduced by 653 PgC during the LGM, which corresponds to the emission of 308 ppm atmospheric CO2. The carbon distribution during the LGM that is predicted from using an atmospheric-ocean-vegetation (AOV) GCM and using the LPJ-DGVM after an atmospheric-ocean (AO) GCM, is generally the same, but the difference is not negligible for explaining the lowering of atmospheric CO2 during the LGM.
Mesons in 2-Dimensional QCD on the Light Cone
O. Abe,G. Aubrecht,K. Tanaka
Physics , 1997, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.56.2242
Abstract: Two dimensional QCD is quantized on the light front coordinate. We solve the Einstein-Schr\"odinger equation by the use of Tamm-Dancoff truncation and find that the simplest wavefunction produces the $M/g$ versus $m/g$ relation in agreement with other calculations, where $M$ and $m$ are the masses of the ground state and quarks, respectively.
Non-motor signs and symptoms in Parkinson’s disease  [PDF]
Kazuo Abe
Health (Health) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/health.2012.431171
Abstract: Motor symptoms are cardinal clinical features of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Progress in drug therapy and rehabilitation has been presenting beneficial effect for motor symptoms. However, non-motor symptoms and signs in PD have been accumulated growing attentions and its amelioration may also give beneficial effect for PD patients’ and their care givers’ quality of life. In this mini-review, I overviewed non-motor symptoms and signs in PD.
A Geometric Approach to Temptation and Self-Control  [PDF]
Koji Abe
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2016.63060
Abstract: By making use of a geometry of preferences, Abe (2012) proves the Gul and Pesendorfer’s utility representation theorem about temptation without self-control. This companion paper provides a similar proof for the Gul and Pesendorfer's utility representation theorem about temptation and costly self-control. As a result, the both theorems are proved in the unified way.
Silicon Deposition in Leaf Trichomes of Cucurbitaceae Horticultural Plants: A Short Report  [PDF]
Jun Abe
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2019.103034
Abstract: Silicon deposition in leaf trichome of six horticultural Cucurbitaceae species, cucumber (Cucumis sativus), pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima), melon (Cucumis melo), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida) was observed by an X-ray microanalyzer coupled with an environmental scanning electron microscope. The elements that presented in the surface of three or four leaves of the individual species were detected and mapped by the X-ray microanalyzer. In leaves of cucumber, pumpkin, and melon, high accumulation of silicon was detected in cells surrounding the bases of the trichome hair and the hair itself deposited calcium. On the other hand, in sponge gourd and bottle gourd, high accumulation of silicon was detected only in the hair. In watermelon leaves, silicon deposited both in the hair and in cells surrounding the bases of the hair. Thus, horticultural Cucurbitaceae plants have interspecific variation in the pattern of silicon deposition in leaf trichomes.
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