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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 401176 matches for " Nomdo M. Jansonius "
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Persistence, Spatial Distribution and Implications for Progression Detection of Blind Parts of the Visual Field in Glaucoma: A Clinical Cohort Study
Francisco G. Junoy Montolio, Christiaan Wesselink, Nomdo M. Jansonius
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0041211
Abstract: Background Visual field testing is an essential part of glaucoma care. It is hampered by variability related to the disease itself, response errors and fatigue. In glaucoma, blind parts of the visual field contribute to the diagnosis but - once established – not to progression detection; they only increase testing time. The aims of this study were to describe the persistence and spatial distribution of blind test locations in standard automated perimetry in glaucoma and to explore how the omission of presumed blind test locations would affect progression detection. Methodology/Principal Findings Data from 221 eyes of 221 patients from a cohort study with the Humphrey Field Analyzer with 30–2 grid were used. Patients were stratified according to baseline mean deviation (MD) in six strata of 5 dB width each. For one, two, three and four consecutive <0 dB sensitivities in the same test location in a series of baseline tests, the median probabilities to observe <0 dB again in the concerning test location in a follow-up test were 76, 86, 88 and 90%, respectively. For <10 dB, the probabilities were 88, 95, 97 and 98%, respectively. Median (interquartile range) percentages of test locations with three consecutive <0 dB sensitivities were 0(0–0), 0(0–2), 4(0–9), 17(8–27), 27(20–40) and 60(50–70)% for the six MD strata. Similar percentages were found for a subset of test locations within 10 degree eccentricity (P>0.1 for all strata). Omitting test locations with three consecutive <0 dB sensitivities at baseline did not affect the performance of the MD-based Nonparametric Progression Analysis progression detection algorithm. Conclusions/Significance Test locations that have been shown to be reproducibly blind tend to display a reasonable blindness persistence and do no longer contribute to progression detection. There is no clinically useful universal MD cut-off value beyond which testing can be limited to 10 degree eccentricity.
Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs and Incident Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Population-Based Cohort Study
Michael W. Marcus, Rogier P. H. M. Müskens, Wishal D. Ramdas, Roger C. W. Wolfs, Paulus T. V. M. De Jong, Johannes R. Vingerling, Albert Hofman, Bruno H. Stricker, Nomdo M. Jansonius
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0029724
Abstract: Background Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that may lead to blindness. An elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is its major risk factor. OAG treatment is currently exclusively directed towards the lowering of the IOP. IOP lowering does not prevent disease progression in all patients and thus other treatment modalities are needed. Earlier studies reported cholesterol-lowering drugs to have neuroprotective properties. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between the use of cholesterol-lowering drugs and incident OAG. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants in a prospective population-based cohort study underwent ophthalmic examinations, including IOP measurements and perimetry, at baseline and follow-up. The use of statins and non-statin cholesterol-lowering drugs was monitored continuously during the study. Associations between the use of cholesterol-lowering drugs and incident OAG were analyzed with Cox regression; associations between cholesterol-lowering drugs and IOP at follow-up were analyzed with multiple linear regression. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, 108 of 3939 eligible participants (2.7%) developed OAG. The hazard ratio for statin use was 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.31–0.96; P = 0.034) and for non-statin cholesterol-lowering drugs 2.07 (0.81–5.33; P = 0.13). The effect of statins was more pronounced with prolonged use (hazard ratio 0.89 [0.41–1.94; P = 0.77] for use two years or less; 0.46 [0.23–0.94; P = 0.033] for use more than two years; P-value for trend 0.10). The analyzes were adjusted for age and gender, baseline IOP and IOP-lowering treatment, the family history of glaucoma, and myopia. There was no effect of statins on the IOP. Conclusions/Significance Long-term use of statins appears to be associated with a reduced risk of OAG. The observed effect was independent of the IOP. These findings are in line with the idea that statins have neuroprotective properties and may open a way to a new OAG treatment modality.
Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human Ciliary Body Epithelia
Sarah F. Janssen, Theo G. M. F. Gorgels, Koen Bossers, Jacoline B. ten Brink, Anke H. W. Essing, Martijn Nagtegaal, Peter J. van der Spek, Nomdo M. Jansonius, Arthur A. B. Bergen
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044973
Abstract: Purpose The ciliary body (CB) of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE) and pigmented (PE) neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. Methods We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. Results The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (N)PE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. Conclusion Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma.
Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human and Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelium
Sarah F. Janssen, Sophie J. F. van der Spek, Jacoline B. ten Brink, Anke H. W. Essing, Theo G. M. F. Gorgels, Peter J. van der Spek, Nomdo M. Jansonius, Arthur A. B. Bergen
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083345
Abstract: Background The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly implicated in disorders like Alzheimer disease, hydrocephalus or glaucoma. To study human genetic diseases and potential new therapies, mouse models are widely used. This requires a detailed knowledge of similarities and differences in gene expression and functional annotation between the species. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare gene expression and functional annotation of healthy human and mouse CPE. Methods We performed 44k Agilent microarray hybridizations with RNA derived from laser dissected healthy human and mouse CPE cells. We functionally annotated and compared the gene expression data of human and mouse CPE using the knowledge database Ingenuity. We searched for common and species specific gene expression patterns and function between human and mouse CPE. We also made a comparison with previously published CPE human and mouse gene expression data. Results Overall, the human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar. Their major functionalities included epithelial junctions, transport, energy production, neuro-endocrine signaling, as well as immunological, neurological and hematological functions and disorders. The mouse CPE presented two additional functions not found in the human CPE: carbohydrate metabolism and a more extensive list of (neural) developmental functions. We found three genes specifically expressed in the mouse CPE compared to human CPE, being ACE, PON1 and TRIM3 and no human specifically expressed CPE genes compared to mouse CPE. Conclusion Human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar, and display many common functionalities. Nonetheless, we also identified a few genes and pathways which suggest that the CPE between mouse and man differ with respect to transport and metabolic functions.
A Genome-Wide Association Study of Optic Disc Parameters
Wishal D. Ramdas equal contributor,Leonieke M. E. van Koolwijk equal contributor,M. Kamran Ikram equal contributor,Nomdo M. Jansonius,Paulus T. V. M. de Jong,Arthur A. B. Bergen,Aaron Isaacs,Najaf Amin,Yurii S. Aulchenko,Roger C. W. Wolfs,Albert Hofman,Fernando Rivadeneira,Ben A. Oostra,Andre G. Uitterlinden,Pirro Hysi,Christopher J. Hammond,Hans G. Lemij,Johannes R. Vingerling ,Caroline C. W. Klaver equal contributor,Cornelia M. van Duijn equal contributor
PLOS Genetics , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000978
Abstract: The optic nerve head is involved in many ophthalmic disorders, including common diseases such as myopia and open-angle glaucoma. Two of the most important parameters are the size of the optic disc area and the vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR). Both are highly heritable but genetically largely undetermined. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data to identify genetic variants associated with optic disc area and VCDR. The gene discovery included 7,360 unrelated individuals from the population-based Rotterdam Study I and Rotterdam Study II cohorts. These cohorts revealed two genome-wide significant loci for optic disc area, rs1192415 on chromosome 1p22 (p = 6.72×10?19) within 117 kb of the CDC7 gene and rs1900004 on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 (p = 2.67×10?33) within 10 kb of the ATOH7 gene. They revealed two genome-wide significant loci for VCDR, rs1063192 on chromosome 9p21 (p = 6.15×10?11) in the CDKN2B gene and rs10483727 on chromosome 14q22.3-q23 (p = 2.93×10?10) within 40 kbp of the SIX1 gene. Findings were replicated in two independent Dutch cohorts (Rotterdam Study III and Erasmus Rucphen Family study; N = 3,612), and the TwinsUK cohort (N = 843). Meta-analysis with the replication cohorts confirmed the four loci and revealed a third locus at 16q12.1 associated with optic disc area, and four other loci at 11q13, 13q13, 17q23 (borderline significant), and 22q12.1 for VCDR. ATOH7 was also associated with VCDR independent of optic disc area. Three of the loci were marginally associated with open-angle glaucoma. The protein pathways in which the loci of optic disc area are involved overlap with those identified for VCDR, suggesting a common genetic origin.
Common Genetic Determinants of Intraocular Pressure and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma
Leonieke M. E. van Koolwijk equal contributor,Wishal D. Ramdas equal contributor,M. Kamran Ikram,Nomdo M. Jansonius,Francesca Pasutto,Pirro G. Hysi,Stuart Macgregor,Sarah F. Janssen,Alex W. Hewitt,Ananth C. Viswanathan,Jacoline B. ten Brink,S. Mohsen Hosseini,Najaf Amin,Dominiek D. G. Despriet,Jacqueline J. M. Willemse-Assink,Rogier Kramer,Fernando Rivadeneira,Maksim Struchalin,Yurii S. Aulchenko,Nicole Weisschuh,Matthias Zenkel,Christian Y. Mardin,Eugen Gramer,Ulrich Welge-Lüssen,Grant W. Montgomery,Francis Carbonaro,Terri L. Young,The DCCT/EDIC Research Group,Céline Bellenguez,Peter McGuffin,Paul J. Foster,Fotis Topouzis,Paul Mitchell,Jie Jin Wang,Tien Y. Wong,Monika A. Czudowska,Albert Hofman,Andre G. Uitterlinden,Roger C. W. Wolfs,Paulus T. V. M. de Jong,Ben A. Oostra,Andrew D. Paterson,Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2,David A. Mackey,Arthur A. B. Bergen,André Reis,Christopher J. Hammond,Johannes R. Vingerling,Hans G. Lemij,Caroline C. W. Klaver,Cornelia M. van Duijn
PLOS Genetics , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002611
Abstract: Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p = 1.4×10?8), and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p = 1.6×10?8). In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N = 1,432 glaucoma cases), both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p = 2.4×10?2 for rs11656696 and p = 9.1×10?4 for rs7555523). GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation.
De stijl van Huizinga
F. Jansonius
BMGN : Low Countries Historical Review , 1973,
Abstract:
Identification and Characterization of Cells with Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Human Primary Lung Cancer Cell Lines
Ping Wang, Quanli Gao, Zhenhe Suo, Else Munthe, Steinar Solberg, Liwei Ma, Mengyu Wang, Nomdo Anton Christiaan Westerdaal, Gunnar Kvalheim, Gustav Gaudernack
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057020
Abstract: Lung cancer (LC) with its different subtypes is generally known as a therapy resistant cancer with the highest morbidity rate worldwide. Therapy resistance of a tumor is thought to be related to cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumors. There have been indications that the lung cancer is propagated and maintained by a small population of CSCs. To study this question we established a panel of 15 primary lung cancer cell lines (PLCCLs) from 20 fresh primary tumors using a robust serum-free culture system. We subsequently focused on identification of lung CSCs by studying these cell lines derived from 4 representative lung cancer subtypes such as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), large cell carcinoma (LCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC). We identified a small population of cells strongly positive for CD44 (CD44high) and a main population which was either weakly positive or negative for CD44 (CD44low/?). Co-expression of CD90 further narrowed down the putative stem cell population in PLCCLs from SCLC and LCC as spheroid-forming cells were mainly found within the CD44highCD90+ sub-population. Moreover, these CD44highCD90+ cells revealed mesenchymal morphology, increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-Cadherin and Vimentin, increased mRNA levels of the embryonic stem cell related genes Nanog and Oct4 and increased resistance to irradiation compared to other sub-populations studied, suggesting the CD44highCD90+ population a good candidate for the lung CSCs. Both CD44highCD90+ and CD44highCD90? cells in the PLCCL derived from SCC formed spheroids, whereas the CD44low/? cells were lacking this potential. These results indicate that CD44highCD90+ sub-population may represent CSCs in SCLC and LCC, whereas in SCC lung cancer subtype, CSC potentials were found within the CD44high sub-population.
Study of Duct Characteristics Deduced from Low Latitude Ground Observations of Day-Time Whistler at Jammu  [PDF]
M. Altaf, M. M. Ahmad
International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics (IJAA) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijaa.2013.33032
Abstract:

Propagation characteristics of low latitude whistler duct characteristics have been investigated based on day-time measurements at Jammu. The morphogical characteristics of low latitude whistlers are discussed and compared with characteristics of middle and high latitude whistlers. The Max. electron density (Nm) at the height of the ionosphere obtained from whistler dispersion comes out to be higher than that of the background which is in accordance with the characteristics of whistler duct. The equivalent width is found to be close to the satellite observations and the characteristics of whistler duct in low latitude ionosphere are similar to those in middle and high latitude ionosphere. The width of ducts estimated from the diffuseness of the whistler track observed during magnetic storm is found to lie in the range of 50 - 200 Km.

Review Article: Immobilized Molecules Using Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology  [PDF]
Magdy M. M. Elnashar
Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology (JBNB) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jbnb.2010.11008
Abstract: Immobilized molecules using biomaterials and nanobiotechnology is a very interesting topic that touching almost all aspects of our life. It uses the sciences of biology, chemistry, physics, materials engineering and computer science to develop instruments and products that are at the cutting edge of some of today’s most promising scientific frontiers. In this review article, the author based on his experience in this arena has tried to focus on some of the supports for im-mobilization; the most important molecules to be immobilized such as DNA, cells, enzymes, metals, polysaccharides, etc and their applications in medicine, food, drug, water treatment, energy and even in aerospace. He specified a special section on what is new in the arena of supports and technologies used in enzyme immobilization and finally a recommendation by the author for future work with a special attention to up-to-date references.
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