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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 210919 matches for " Nancy L. Bridier "
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Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective
Carla J. Thompson,Nancy L. Bridier
Journal of Aging Research , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/570407
Abstract: The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample ( ) also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual’s passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations. 1. Introduction The special population of homeless veterans has become an alarming concern within America’s aging population challenges. According to the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans [1], while only 7% of the US population is comprised of veterans, approximately 13% of the adult homeless populations are veterans. Recent national survey efforts conducted by the Veterans’ Administration and related government agencies report that 8.6% of homeless veterans are over the age of 62 with aging female homeless veteran populations increasing each year [2]. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if they live in poverty or are minority veterans in poverty. “Low income veterans are twice as likely to become homeless than the general population of low-income adults” [1, paragraph 2]. Almost half of homeless veterans in the United States are over the age of 51 and are comprised primarily of veterans representing the Baby Boomers and are veterans of the Vietnam War years [3]. This mixed methods
Benefits of Docosahexaenoic Acid, Folic Acid, Vitamin D and Iodine on Foetal and Infant Brain Development and Function Following Maternal Supplementation during Pregnancy and Lactation
Nancy L. Morse
Nutrients , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/nu4070799
Abstract: Scientific literature is increasingly reporting on dietary deficiencies in many populations of some nutrients critical for foetal and infant brain development and function. Purpose: To highlight the potential benefits of maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other important complimentary nutrients, including vitamin D, folic acid and iodine during pregnancy and/or breast feeding for foetal and/or infant brain development and/or function. Methods: English language systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, cross-sectional and case-control studies were obtained through searches on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials from January 2000 through to February 2012 and reference lists of retrieved articles. Reports were selected if they included benefits and harms of maternal supplementation of DHA, vitamin D, folic acid or iodine supplementation during pregnancy and/or lactation. Results: Maternal DHA intake during pregnancy and/or lactation can prolong high risk pregnancies, increase birth weight, head circumference and birth length, and can enhance visual acuity, hand and eye co-ordination, attention, problem solving and information processing. Vitamin D helps maintain pregnancy and promotes normal skeletal and brain development. Folic acid is necessary for normal foetal spine, brain and skull development. Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone production necessary for normal brain and nervous system development during gestation that impacts childhood function. Conclusion: Maternal supplementation within recommended safe intakes in populations with dietary deficiencies may prevent many brain and central nervous system malfunctions and even enhance brain development and function in their offspring.
Infertility in Men with Spinal Cord Injury: Research and Treatment
Nancy L. Brackett
Scientifica , 2012, DOI: 10.6064/2012/578257
Abstract:
Concept mapping for learners of all ages
Nancy L. Gallenstein
Journal for Educators, Teachers and Trainers , 2013,
Abstract: Concept mapping is an inquiry technique that provides students at all ages with opportunities to demonstrate learning through performance. A concept map refers to a graphic/visual representation of concepts with linking connections that show various relationships between concepts (Novak & Gowin, 1984). Assessment is an ongoing process integrated with instruction across subject areas. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) emphasizes that assessment should focus on both the enhancement of student learning as well as serve as a valuable tool for making instructional decisions (NCTM, 2000). Assessment activities can take on a variety of forms, one being performance tasks. In this manuscript, an explanation of concept mapping is provided for learners ages 3 – 12 along with several examples of concept maps for young learners, including examples from an assessment project in the subject area of mathematics. Also presented are the numerous benefits of the concept mapping technique for both students and teachers.
Infertility in Men with Spinal Cord Injury: Research and Treatment
Nancy L. Brackett
Scientifica , 2012, DOI: 10.6064/2012/578257
Abstract: Spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs most often to young men. Following SCI, most men are infertile due to a combination of erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Erectile dysfunction may be treated by the same therapies that are used in the general population. Similarly, the same treatments that are effective to assist conception in couples with non-SCI male factor patients are effective in assisting conception in SCI male-factor patients. The most apparent differences in male-factor symptoms between SCI and non-SCI patients are the high occurrences of anejaculation and atypical semen profiles in men with SCI. Methods available to assist ejaculation in men with SCI include penile vibratory stimulation and EEJ. Use of surgical sperm retrieval as the first line of treatment for anejaculation in men with SCI is controversial. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm concentration, but abnormally low sperm motility. Toxic substances in the semen contribute to this problem. Despite impaired sperm parameters, pregnancy outcomes using sperm from men with SCI are similar to pregnancy outcomes using sperm from non-SCI men. Future studies should focus on improving natural ejaculation and improving semen quality in these men. 1. Introduction Spinal cord injury occurs most often to young men at the peak of their reproductive health [1]. In the United States, 80% of new injuries occur to men between the ages of 16 and 45 [2]. Similar statistics are found worldwide [3–12]. Owing to the fact that the most common causes of injury include motor vehicle accidents, violence, sport-related injuries, and falls, it has been assumed that the gender disparity is due to more men than women engaging risk-taking behavior that leads to injury. The actual reason for the disparity is unknown. There is some evidence suggesting that hormones, rather than behavior, may contribute to the disparity. For example, it has been shown that estrogen may be neuroprotective and/or that testosterone may be neurotoxic after injury [13, 14]. Following SCI, most men have severely impaired fertility characterized by erectile dysfunction (ED), ejaculatory dysfunction, and semen abnormalities [15–18]. This paper will discuss current treatments for infertility in men with SCI, including treatments for ED as well as methods of semen retrieval. A discussion of the latest research findings regarding causes of abnormal semen quality will also be presented. The paper will conclude with recommendations for treating infertile couples with a male
Phantom study of the impact of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiRTM) on image quality for paediatric computed tomography  [PDF]
Angjelina Protik, Karen Thomas, Paul Babyn, Nancy L. Ford
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2012.512A100
Abstract:

Quantitative analysis of image quality will be helpful for designing ASiRTM-enhanced paediatric CT protocols, balancing image quality and radiation dose. Catphan600 phantom studies were performed on a GE Discovery HD750 64-slice CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with 0% - 100% ASiRTM (tube current 150 mA, variable kVp 80 - 140) in order to determine the optimal ASiRTM-Filtered Back Projection (FBP) blend. Images reconstructed with a 50% ASiRTM-50% FBP blend were compared to FBP images (0% ASiRTM) over a wide range of kVp (80 - 140) and mA (10 - 400) values. Measurements of image noise, CT number accuracy and uniformity, spatial and contrast resolution, and low contrast detectability were performed on axial and reformatted coronal images. Improvements in CNR, low contrast detectability and radial uniformity were observed in ASiRTM images compared to FBP images. 50% ASiRTM was associated with a 26% - 30% reduction in image noise. Changes in noise texture were observed at higher %

Monitoring vascular changes induced by photodynamic therapy using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography  [PDF]
Otilia C. Nasui, Stuart K. Bisland, Nancy L. Ford
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2013.62016
Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine whether contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography can be used for non-invasive imaging of the early-stage changes in the vasculature of tumours that have been treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The subjects used were C3H mice with an RIF-1 tumour implanted subcutaneously and allowed to grow for 3 weeks prior to treatment. The experimental groups were PDT-treated (150 J/cm2 and 50 J/cm2) and control (150 J/cm2 light-only and untreated). The laser light exposure was performed at 15 - 30 minutes after the administration of the photosensitizer (BPD-MA). The contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography imaging procedure consisted of eight-second scans taking place before treatment and up to 24 hours after treatment. The 150 J/cm2 PDT group showed a significant increase in the ratio of blood volume to tumour volume at 2, 8 and 24 hours after treatment when compared to pre-treatment measurements (p < 0.01). The observed increase in the blood volume to tumour volume at the later time points corresponds to a decrease in epithelial coverage on immunohistochemical stained (CD31) slides for the 150 J/cm2 PDT group at 24 hours after treatment. This preliminary study indicates that micro-CT can detect compromised vasculature in tumours treated with high-fluence photodynamic therapy as early as 2 hours post treatment.

Does Resampled Image Data Offer Quantitative Image Quality Benefit for Pediatric CT?  [PDF]
Nancy L. Ford, Angjelina Protik, Paul Babyn, Karen Thomas
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2014.76036
Abstract: Acquiring CT images with thin slices can improve resolution and detectability, but cause an increase in the image noise. To compensate for the additional image noise, the kVp or mA can be increased, which carries a dose penalty to the patient. We investigate the image quality achieved in MPR images reformatted from different slice thicknesses 0.625 mm and 5 mm, to determine if a thicker slice could be resampled to smaller thickness with minimal loss of image information. Catphan?600 phantom was imaged using selected kVp/mA settings (80 kVp/250 mA, 100 kVp/ 150 mA and 120 kVp/200 mA) to generate slices with thicknesses of 0.625 mm and 5 mm using a GE Discovery HD750 64-slice CT scanner to investigate the impact of the acquisition slice thickness on the overall image quality in MPRs. Measurements of image noise, uniformity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), low contrast detectability and limiting spatial resolution were performed on axial and coronal multiplanar reformatted images (MPRs). Increased noise, reduced contrast-to-noise ratio, and improved limiting spatial resolution and low contrast detection were observed in 2 mm coronal MPRs generated with 0.625 mm thin slices when compared to the MPRs from 5 mm thick slices. If the 2 mm coronal MPRs acquired with 5 mm slices are resampled to 0.6 mm slice thickness, the reductions in limiting resolution and low contrast detection are compensated, although with reduced uniformity and increased image noise. Thick slice image acquisitions yield better CNR and less noise in the images, whereas thin slices exhibited improved spatial resolution and low contrast detectability. Retrospectively resampling into thinner slices before obtaining the coronal MPRs provided a balance between image smoothness and identifying fine image detail. Which approach provides the optimal image quality may also depend on the imaging task, size and composition of the features of interest, and radiologist preference.
Physician versus Patient Perception of Physician Hospital Discharge Communication: A Preliminary Study  [PDF]
Michael J. Maniaci, Michael G. Heckman, Nancy L. Dawson
Open Journal of Internal Medicine (OJIM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojim.2014.44016
Abstract: Background: Physician discharge instructions are critical to patient care because they are the link transitioning the hospital care plan to the home. We hypothesize that physician perception of discharge instructions communication is better than patient perception. Objective: In a preliminary study, to compare patient and physician perception of communication at discharge. Design: Observational, survey-based. Setting: 330-bed adult teaching hospital. Participants: Surveys were mailed to 100 patients discharged home and 49 internal medicine physicians responsible for those patients’ care. Each physician had between 1 and 4 patients surveyed. Measurements: Patients and physicians received anonymous 5-item questionnaires concerning physician communication at discharge. Patient surveys inquired about their physicians’ communication at the specific physician encounter, while physician surveys asked about the physicians’ overall self-perception of discharge communication skills. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 59 patients and 40 physicians. Physicians reported a noticeably better perception of communication than their patients regarding spending adequate time reviewing the discharge plan (83% vs. 61%, P = 0.027), speaking slowly enough to understand (98% vs. 80%, P = 0.013), using wording that could be easily understood (100% vs. 68%, P < 0.001) and taking time to answer questions before discharge (85% vs. 59%, P = 0.008). Perception of discharge communication improved with physician experience for several survey items. Conclusions: This study provides evidence suggesting that physician perception of communication at discharge is better than patient perception. Future studies of larger sample size and direct patient-physician pairing focusing on patient satisfaction and outcomes are needed.
Two large-scale analyses of Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon de novo insertion events indicate that Ty1 targets nucleosomal DNA near the H2A/H2B interface
Bridier-Nahmias Antoine,Lesage Pascale
Mobile DNA , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1759-8753-3-22
Abstract: Background Over the years, a number of reports have revealed that Ty1 integration occurs in a 1-kb window upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes with an approximate 80-bp periodicity between each integration hotspot and that this targeting requires active Pol III transcription at the site of integration. However, the molecular bases of Ty1 targeting are still not understood. Findings The publications by Baller et al. and Mularoni et al. in the April issue of Genome Res. report the first high-throughput sequencing analysis of Ty1 de novo insertion events. Their observations converge to the same conclusion, that Ty1 targets a specific surface of the nucleosome at he H2A/H2B interface. Conclusion This discovery is important, and should help identifying factor(s) involved in Ty1 targeting. Recent data on transposable elements and retroviruses integration site choice obtained by large-scale analyses indicate that transcription and chromatin structure play an important role in this process. The studies reported in this commentary add a new evidence of the importance of chromatin in integration selectivity that should be of interest for everyone interested in transposable elements integration.
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