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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 149817 matches for " Naess H "
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Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome
Naess H, Romi F
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S22950
Abstract: mparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome Original Research (2852) Total Article Views Authors: Naess H, Romi F Published Date August 2011 Volume 2011:7 Pages 497 - 502 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S22950 Halvor Naess, Fredrik Romi Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway Background: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction. Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Multivariate analyses were performed with location of stroke (cord or brain), neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome (both Barthel Index [BI] 1 week after symptom onset and discharge home or to other institution) as dependent variables. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that patients with spinal cord infarction were younger, more often female, and less afflicted by hypertension and cardiac disease than patients with cerebral infarction. Functional score (BI) was lower among patients with spinal cord infarctions 1 week after onset of symptoms (P < 0.001). Odds ratio for being discharged home was 5.5 for patients with spinal cord infarction compared to cerebral infarction after adjusting for BI scored 1 week after onset (P = 0.019). Conclusion: Patients with spinal cord infarction have a risk factor profile that differs significantly from that of patients with cerebral infarction, although there are some parallels to cerebral infarction caused by atherosclerosis. Patients with spinal cord infarction were more likely to be discharged home when adjusting for early functional level on multivariate analysis.
Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome
Naess H,Romi F
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2011,
Abstract: Halvor Naess, Fredrik RomiDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, NorwayBackground: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction.Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Multivariate analyses were performed with location of stroke (cord or brain), neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome (both Barthel Index [BI] 1 week after symptom onset and discharge home or to other institution) as dependent variables.Results: Multivariate analysis showed that patients with spinal cord infarction were younger, more often female, and less afflicted by hypertension and cardiac disease than patients with cerebral infarction. Functional score (BI) was lower among patients with spinal cord infarctions 1 week after onset of symptoms (P < 0.001). Odds ratio for being discharged home was 5.5 for patients with spinal cord infarction compared to cerebral infarction after adjusting for BI scored 1 week after onset (P = 0.019).Conclusion: Patients with spinal cord infarction have a risk factor profile that differs significantly from that of patients with cerebral infarction, although there are some parallels to cerebral infarction caused by atherosclerosis. Patients with spinal cord infarction were more likely to be discharged home when adjusting for early functional level on multivariate analysis.Keywords: spinal cord infarction, cerebral infarction, risk factors, short-term outcome
The effects of fatigue, pain, and depression on quality of life in ischemic stroke patients: The Bergen Stroke Study
Naess H, Lunde L, Brogger J
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S32780
Abstract: ts of fatigue, pain, and depression on quality of life in ischemic stroke patients: The Bergen Stroke Study Original Research (1599) Total Article Views Authors: Naess H, Lunde L, Brogger J Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 407 - 413 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S32780 Received: 09 April 2012 Accepted: 03 May 2012 Published: 27 June 2012 Halvor Naess,1 Lene Lunde,2 Jan Brogger1 1Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, 2Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Background: Many patients with cerebral infarction suffer from symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate these symptoms in relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) on long-term follow-up. Materials and methods: All surviving stroke patients admitted to the Stroke Unit, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway between February 2006 and November 2008 were sent a questionnaire, including a visual analog pain scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Barthel Index, and three measures of HRQoL – 15D, EuroQol, and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale – at least 6 months after stroke onset. Cox regression survival analysis, including EQ-5D, was performed by November 2009. Results: The questionnaire was returned by 328 patients. All three symptoms were reported by 10.1% of the patients, and 26% reported two symptoms. There was a significant association between worse HRQoL scores and an increasing number of cooccurring symptoms for all three HRQoL scores. Fatigue, depression, pain, functional state, and sleeping disorder on follow-up accounted for 58%–83% of the variability in HRQoL, depending on which HRQoL scale was used. Cox regression analysis showed that mortality was associated with a low EuroQol score (P = 0.016). Conclusion: Pain, fatigue, and depression were common symptoms among these stroke patients and, to a large extent, they determined the patients' HRQoL. Low HRQoL was associated with increased mortality.
The effects of fatigue, pain, and depression on quality of life in ischemic stroke patients: The Bergen Stroke Study
Naess H,Lunde L,Brogger J
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2012,
Abstract: Halvor Naess,1 Lene Lunde,2 Jan Brogger11Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, 2Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Bergen, NorwayBackground: Many patients with cerebral infarction suffer from symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate these symptoms in relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) on long-term follow-up.Materials and methods: All surviving stroke patients admitted to the Stroke Unit, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway between February 2006 and November 2008 were sent a questionnaire, including a visual analog pain scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Barthel Index, and three measures of HRQoL – 15D, EuroQol, and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale – at least 6 months after stroke onset. Cox regression survival analysis, including EQ-5D, was performed by November 2009.Results: The questionnaire was returned by 328 patients. All three symptoms were reported by 10.1% of the patients, and 26% reported two symptoms. There was a significant association between worse HRQoL scores and an increasing number of cooccurring symptoms for all three HRQoL scores. Fatigue, depression, pain, functional state, and sleeping disorder on follow-up accounted for 58%–83% of the variability in HRQoL, depending on which HRQoL scale was used. Cox regression analysis showed that mortality was associated with a low EuroQol score (P = 0.016).Conclusion: Pain, fatigue, and depression were common symptoms among these stroke patients and, to a large extent, they determined the patients' HRQoL. Low HRQoL was associated with increased mortality.Keywords: cerebral infarction, symptoms, mortality
Mineral Balance Plasticity of Cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus) in Quebec-Labrador Bogs  [PDF]
Léon Etienne Parent, Serge-étienne Parent, Valérie Hébert-Gentile, Kristine Naess, Line Lapointe
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2013.47183
Abstract:

The ionome, or plant elemental signature, is the elemental composition of an organisms, that may vary with genotypic traits and phenotypic plasticity. Cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L.) is a circumboreal wild berry naturally growing in oligotrophic oceanic bogs ofQuebecandLabrador. Our objective was to relate cloudberry stand productivity to the ionomes of female ramets and explore the cause of nutrient imbalance in low-performing stands. We analyzed 13 elements in female ramets collected in 86 natural sites where crop productivity varied widely. We computed orthogonally arranged balances reflecting plant stoichiometric rules and soil biogeochemistry. Balances were expressed as isometric log ratios (ilr) between ad hoc sub-compositions. Balances were synthesized into a Mahalanobis distance optimized based on receiving operating characteristics (ROC). The critical Mahalanobis distance was found to be 5.29 for cutoff berry yield of3.8 g.m-2 with test performance of 0.88, as measured by the area under the ROC curve. Although past research on cloudberry focused mainly on the N/P ratio, this exploratory mineral balance analysis indicated that imbalance in the [P,N | S,C] and [Al | Nutrients] partitions appeared to be the factors limiting the most cloudberry productivity

Low body temperature associated with severe ischemic stroke within 6 hours of onset: The Bergen NORSTROKE Study
Kvistad CE, Thomassen L, Waje-Andreassen U, Naess H
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S31614
Abstract: w body temperature associated with severe ischemic stroke within 6 hours of onset: The Bergen NORSTROKE Study Original Research (1731) Total Article Views Authors: Kvistad CE, Thomassen L, Waje-Andreassen U, Naess H Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 333 - 338 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S31614 Received: 09 March 2012 Accepted: 29 March 2012 Published: 03 June 2012 Christopher E Kvistad, Lars Thomassen, Ulrike Waje-Andreassen, Halvor Naess Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Background: Hypothermia is considered neuroprotective and a potential treatment in cerebral ischemia. Some studies suggest that hyperthermia may promote clot lysis. We hypothesized that low body temperature would prolong time to spontaneous clot lysis resulting in an association between low body temperature and severe neurological deficits in the early phase of ischemic stroke. Methods: In this prospective study, patients (n = 516) exhibiting ischemic stroke with symptom onset within 6 hours were included. Body temperature and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score were registered on admission. Because low body temperature on admission may be secondary to immobilization due to large stroke, separate analyses were performed on patients with cerebral hemorrhage admitted within 6 hours (n = 85). Results: Linear regression showed that low body temperature on admission was independently associated with a high NIHSS score within 6 hours of stroke onset in patients with ischemic stroke (P < 0.001). The association persisted when NIHSS was measured at 24 hours after admission. No such associations were found in patients with cerebral hemorrhage admitted within 6 hours of stroke onset. Conclusion: Our study suggests that low body temperature within 6 hours of symptom onset is associated with severe ischemic stroke. This is in support of our hypothesis, although other contributing mechanisms cannot be excluded.
Low body temperature associated with severe ischemic stroke within 6 hours of onset: The Bergen NORSTROKE Study
Kvistad CE,Thomassen L,Waje-Andreassen U,Naess H
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2012,
Abstract: Christopher E Kvistad, Lars Thomassen, Ulrike Waje-Andreassen, Halvor NaessDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, Bergen, NorwayBackground: Hypothermia is considered neuroprotective and a potential treatment in cerebral ischemia. Some studies suggest that hyperthermia may promote clot lysis. We hypothesized that low body temperature would prolong time to spontaneous clot lysis resulting in an association between low body temperature and severe neurological deficits in the early phase of ischemic stroke.Methods: In this prospective study, patients (n = 516) exhibiting ischemic stroke with symptom onset within 6 hours were included. Body temperature and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score were registered on admission. Because low body temperature on admission may be secondary to immobilization due to large stroke, separate analyses were performed on patients with cerebral hemorrhage admitted within 6 hours (n = 85).Results: Linear regression showed that low body temperature on admission was independently associated with a high NIHSS score within 6 hours of stroke onset in patients with ischemic stroke (P < 0.001). The association persisted when NIHSS was measured at 24 hours after admission. No such associations were found in patients with cerebral hemorrhage admitted within 6 hours of stroke onset.Conclusion: Our study suggests that low body temperature within 6 hours of symptom onset is associated with severe ischemic stroke. This is in support of our hypothesis, although other contributing mechanisms cannot be excluded.Keywords: body temperature, cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, clot lysis
Leadership is the essential non-technical skill in the trauma team - results of a qualitative study
Magnus Hjortdahl, Amund H Ringen, Anne-Cathrine Naess, Torben Wisborg
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1757-7241-17-48
Abstract: Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted at four different hospitals of various sizes and with different trauma load. At each hospital a nurse, an anaesthesiologist and a team leader (surgeon) were interviewed. The conversations were transcribed and analyzed using systematic text condensation according to the principles of Giorgi's phenomenological analysis as modified by Malterud.Leadership was perceived as an essential component in trauma management. The ideal leader should be an experienced surgeon, have extensive knowledge of trauma care, communicate clearly and radiate confidence. Team leaders were reported to have little trauma experience, and the team leaders interviewed requested more guidance and supervision. The need for better training of trauma teams and especially team leaders requires further investigation and action.Trauma is the leading cause of death in the first four decades of life in Norway [1]. Esposito and colleagues have indicated that one out of four deaths caused by trauma can be prevented with better trauma care [2], and found that the preventable death rate declined to 15% after systems improvement [3]. Chiara and colleagues found that 43% of deaths caused by trauma were possibly preventable. They also found that over 50% of trauma patients received inappropriate treatment in hospital [4]A quite recent study revealed that most treatment errors still occur in the emergency room phase, and found that one of 13 deaths was deemed potentially preventable [5].The trauma team is a complex organisation which has to work smoothly in stressful situations. The number of team members and the condition of the traumatized patients create great challenges for the trauma team. In Norwegian hospitals the trauma teams do not have fixed members, thus members attending the team may vary from one situation to the next. This variation contributes to the many challenges in team interaction. There is also a significant variation between the hospitals in t
Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy in an immunocompetent patient with favourable outcome. A case report
Halvor Naess, Solveig Glad, Anette Storstein, Christine H Rinaldo, Sverre J M?rk, Kjell-Morten Myhr, Hans Hirsch
BMC Neurology , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2377-10-32
Abstract: A 35-year-old immunocompetent man who developed progressive hemianopsia, aphasia, and limb weakness underwent repeated MRI scans of the brain, spinal fluid analyses, and brain biopsy. Before diagnosis was established based on brain biopsy, he was consecutively treated with methylprednisolone, acyclovir, ceftriaxone and plasmapheresis, but he deteriorated rapidly suggestive of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). He started to recover two weeks after the initiation of treatment with cidofovir and has had no relapse at 3 1/2 years of follow-up. MRI has shown marked improvement.PML should be considered in immunocompetent patients with a typical clinical course and MRI findings compatible with PML. Treatment with cidofovir should be considered as early as possible in the disease course.Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is caused by the JC virus (JCV), is a rare and usually fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system typically occurring in severely immunosuppressed patients [1]. The diagnosis of PML is presumptive when based on clinical or radiological evidence and the detection of JCV DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The diagnosis is definitive by detection of viral protein or DNA by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridisation of brain biopsies, respectively. While the JCV genomes of urine isolates usually have an archetypal regulatory region, genomes detected in the CSF and brains from PML patients have always a rearranged viral regulatory region. Even though the majority of PML cases are found in HIV infected patients, cases have been diagnosed in patients with other cellular immunodeficiencies due to haematological malignancy, chemotherapy, organ transplantation, lymphocyte depletion as well as systemic lupus erythematosus [1]. Increasing occurrence of PML in patients exposed to monoclonal antibody therapy such as natalizumab [2], rituximab [3], and efalizumab have been re
Fast and precise map-making for massively multi-detector CMB experiments
D. Sutton,J. A. Zuntz,P. G. Ferreira,M. L. Brown,H. K. Eriksen,B. R. Johnson,A. Kusaka,S. K. Naess,I. K. Wehus
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16954.x
Abstract: Future cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation experiments aim to measure an unprecedentedly small signal - the primordial gravity wave component of the polarisation field B-mode. To achieve this, they will analyse huge datasets, involving years worth of time-ordered data (TOD) from massively multi-detector focal planes. This creates the need for fast and precise methods to complement the M-L approach in analysis pipelines. In this paper, we investigate fast map-making methods as applied to long duration, massively multi-detector, ground-based experiments, in the context of the search for B-modes. We focus on two alternative map-making approaches: destriping and TOD filtering, comparing their performance on simulated multi-detector polarisation data. We have written an optimised, parallel destriping code, the DEStriping CARTographer DESCART, that is generalised for massive focal planes, including the potential effect of cross-correlated TOD 1/f noise. We also determine the scaling of computing time for destriping as applied to a simulated full-season data-set for a realistic experiment. We find that destriping can out-perform filtering in estimating both the large-scale E and B-mode angular power spectra. In particular, filtering can produce significant spurious B-mode power via EB mixing. Whilst this can be removed, it contributes to the variance of B-mode bandpower estimates at scales near the primordial B-mode peak. For the experimental configuration we simulate, this has an effect on the possible detection significance for primordial B-modes. Destriping is a viable alternative fast method to the full M-L approach that does not cause the problems associated with filtering, and is flexible enough to fit into both M-L and Monte-Carlo pseudo-Cl pipelines.
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