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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5407 matches for " NA Kadri "
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Creating animated medical images (Part 2)
NA Kadri,MG Raha
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2006, DOI: 10.2349/biij.2.3.e46
Abstract:
BIIJ embracing social media
NA Kadri,KH Ng
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2010, DOI: 10.2349/biij.6.1.e1
Abstract:
Creating animated medical images (Part 2)
Kadri NA,Raha MG
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2006, DOI: 10.2349/biij.2.3.e46
Abstract:
Creating animated medical images (Part 1)
NA Kadri,MG Raha
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2006, DOI: 10.2349/biij.2.2.e32
Abstract:
The journey so far
KH Ng,BJJ Abdullah,NA Kadri
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2008, DOI: 10.2349/biij.4.1.e1
Abstract:
Riding on the crest of electronic publishing wave
NA Kadri,LK Tan,KH Ng
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2009, DOI: 10.2349/biij.5.1.e1
Abstract:
A concern about plagiarism
KH Ng,BJJ Abdullah,NA Kadri
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal , 2008, DOI: 10.2349/biij.4.2.e22
Abstract:
Benefit-sharing: an inquiry regarding the meaning and limits of the concept in human genetic research
Kadri Simm
Genomics, Society and Policy , 2005,
Abstract: The Human Genome Project and the related research and development activities have raised heated discussions around some very basic ethical and social issues. A much debated concern is that of justice in human genetic research and in possible applications, especially pertaining to questions of just benefit-sharing - who and based on what sort of argumentation has the right to require benefits arising from research and discoveries, and what can even be considered as benefits? In what follows I will be examining and clarifying the notion of benefit-sharing by focusing on its justifications. I will argue for certain qualifications and limitations in using this concept in specific and universal contexts.
L nemaa-muljeid, suvi 1996
Kadri Tamm
M?etagused. Hüperajakiri , 1996,
Abstract: The EFA summer expedition of 1996 to the parishes of Martna and Kirbla was regarded with some prejudice and fears (the religious exorbitance in L nemaa, the introversion of the local people, etc.), but all the more decisively. Soon it was clear that the locals were everything but introverted and religious movements were something I soon started to long for.Quite soon I also got the impression that although there had been several musicians and good singers in that region (now we only managed to collect the basic data and memories of them) and very many still had song notebooks, there was no superstition or any narratives of the kind. For example: My father didn't believe. He did always the opposite. There in a village, it was that: "No, today morning it is no use going out, the horse dung between the shafts." my father still went, just out of stubbornness. But then there were still some who knew both legends of place names (this time very many about Kalevipoeg and Kuradikivi - 'Devilstone') and narratives with a rich religious background. (It is common knowledge that when looking for the oldest and natural born locals, the collector may not notice some really interesting people - just as almost by accident I found a woman born in 1947 whose grandfather had been a musician, mother a singer, who herself told of a treasure-bearer seen by her grandmother, of omens connected with herself, the birth of her son and the death of her mother and of many other things.)It is interesting that quite some of the people who themselves had no other supernatural experiences had still just before the war either seen themselves some heavenly signs or had heard of them from someone close. In most cases the sky had been purple red in the east, but there were more concrete omens as well. The rich bee-traditions of L nemaa which have been recorded in the EFA cardfiles in the `30s, have by now lost most of its religious background. From the earlier local witches, mostly those who dealt with healing plants or fixed sprained bones were mentioned. The of attitudes towards the sensitives and healers of today in L nemaa varied from severe criticism to deep respect.This year, perhaps more material than usual was collected that could serve as a basis for the so-called background studies, that is, what people themselves talk of their life, conditions and how they feel about the way the world is, what they consider to be important, not only folkloristic material and remnants or signs of the primeval beginning of the things.
Joonistatud dokumendid
Kadri Viires
M?etagused. Hüperajakiri , 2005,
Abstract: The article overviews drawings and characteristic features of documental drawing in the Estonian ethnographic material. This is an area that has been related to the activities of artists in collecting and recording folk culture. In recording the early visual material about Estonia in the 17th-18th century travelogues or reference books and the newer 19th century Balto-German agrarian culture, the line between works of arts and documentary illustrations is vague: the visual material is used as a source in studies into both art and ethnology. The enlivening of folklore collection in the late 19th century and early 20th century brought along the documenting of material culture in the form of drawings. A number of artists and art students partook in the collection work initiated in 1909 by the Estonian National Museum. Material relevant to folk art, that could not be stored in the museum, was recorded in the course of collection campaigns. Photographing technology of the time had limited technical resources and availability. At the beginning of the 20th century a separate archive of drawings was established at the Estonian National Museum; ethnographic drawings became a part of the systematised recording of material culture and were in concordance with the museum's collection principles. The criteria for the collected visual material of the time in recording information are, for the most part, valid even now. During the post-WWII period, the studying of ethnic material proved an alternative in counterbalancing the official ideology. Collection, recording and use of folk art in creative work clearly represented the spirit of national self-expression. Documenting folk art increasingly became a part of art instruction, as an important prerequisite of an ethnographic drawing is good knowledge of technological idiosyncrasies and details of construction of the represented object material. A detailed drawing of an object is the most important and effective way of exploring the nature of the object. Modern photography enables to record the material and spiritual context quickly and objectively, or so it seems, but similarly to drawing, it also entails the subjective aspect of the person taking the photo. A photograph does not provide sufficient parameters (such as, e.g. structures, cross-sections, scheme, fixed colour solutions, etc.) for describing/ documenting the object under study. Both ways of documenting may be considered separate forms of producing visual information, which cannot be considered conflicting.
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