oalib

OALib Journal期刊

ISSN: 2333-9721

费用:99美元

投稿

匹配条件: “Misan” ,找到相关结果约7条。
列表显示的所有文章,均可免费获取
第1页/共7条
每页显示
Os museus históricos e pedagógicos do estado de S?o Paulo
Misan, Simona;
Anais do Museu Paulista: História e Cultura Material , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S0101-47142008000200006
Abstract: this paper analyzes the creation of the historical and pedagogical museums network in the state of s?o paulo between 1956 and 1973, mainly taking into consideration the concept for creation, the program, and the role of the museum in society. this work covers a period until the end of the 1990's, when the curators of the museums, which belonged to the state until that time, was transferred to the municipalities by means of a "municipalization" process coordinated by the department of museums and archives of the state department of cultural affairs (dema-sec). it also shows that the implementation of this museums network - among other initiatives in the fields of education and of culture - addressed earlier needs of asserting an identity, emphasizing through projects of this type the hegemonic character of the state. this allowed to align the initiative of creating the museums with others actions carried out by the state before, and also enabled that this topic was take out from its long isolation from the study of state history. it also considers the web of relationships existing among the various sectors with which museums were connected, such as education, culture, and the s?o paulo historical and geographical institute, the government, and society. the implementation of historical and pedagogical museums by means of state action, through its departments of education (from 1956 to 1968) and cultural affairs (from 1968 to 1998) was one of the ways through which the government orientated its activities during those years in the fields of history, education and culture. the central thesis is that the implementation of these museums has fully addressed the aspirations of society at the time, while, at the same time, underscoring the logic behind the ideation that has oriented the characteristic mode of operation of museums during the years in which their curatorship was exercised by the government, and proposes to consider them as a paradigm for "historical museums of
Os museus históricos e pedagógicos do estado de S o Paulo
Simona Misan
Anais do Museu Paulista: História e Cultura Material , 2008,
Abstract: This paper analyzes the creation of the Historical and Pedagogical Museums network in the State of S o Paulo between 1956 and 1973, mainly taking into consideration the concept for creation, the program, and the role of the museum in society. This work covers a period until the end of the 1990's, when the curators of the museums, which belonged to the State until that time, was transferred to the municipalities by means ofa "municipalization"process coordinated by the Department of Museums and Archives of the State Department of Cultural Affairs (DEMA-SEC). It also shows that the implementation of this museums network - among other initiatives in the fields of education and of culture - addressed earlier needs of asserting an identity, emphasizing through projects of this type the hegemonic character of the State. This allowed to align the initiative of creating the museums with others actions carried out by the State before, and also enabled that this topic was take out from its long isolation from the study of State history. It also considers the web of relationships existing among the various sectors with which museums were connected, such as education, culture, and the S o Paulo Historical and Geographical Institute, the Government, and Society. The implementation of Historical and Pedagogical Museums by means of State action, through its Departments of Education (from 1956 to 1968) and Cultural Affairs (from 1968 to 1998) was one of the ways through which the Government orientated its activities during those years in the fields of history, education and culture. The central thesis is that the implementation of these museums has fully addressed the aspirations of society at the time, while, at the same time, underscoring the logic behind the ideation that has oriented the characteristic mode of operation of museums during the years in which their curatorship was exercised by the Government, and proposes to consider them as a paradigm for "historical museums of the State of S o Paulo".
The Association of Central corneal thickness with Intra-ocular Pressure and Refractive Error in a Nigerian Population
Eghosasere Iyamu,Misan Memeh
Online Journal of Health & Allied Sciences , 2008,
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the variation of central corneal thickness (CCT) with intraocular pressure (IOP) and spherical equivalent refractive error. A total of thirty-nine (N=39) subjects within 20-75 years with mean age 45.2 ± 15.4 years were used for this study. The central corneal thickness was assessed with the Corneo-Gage plus ultrasonic Pachymeter, the IOP with slit-lamp mounted Goldmann applanation tonometer and refractive status by Protec 2000 autorefractor, phoropter and trial lens set. Results obtained showed that there was no linear correlation between CCT and spherical equivalent errors, although the association between them was significant (p<0.05). The linear correlation between CCT and IOP was not statistically significant. The central corneal thickness was weakly correlated with age; with increasing age the central corneal thickness decreases. Neither the central corneal thickness nor the intraocular pressure was affected by gender.
Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating a Program to Address the Oral Health Needs of Aboriginal Children in Port Augusta, Australia
E. J. Parker,G. Misan,M. Shearer,L. Richards,A. Russell,H. Mills,L. M. Jamieson
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/496236
Abstract: Aboriginal Australian children experience profound oral health disparities relative to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. In response to community concerns regarding Aboriginal child oral health in the regional town of Port Augusta, South Australia, a child dental health service was established within a Community Controlled Aboriginal Health Service. A partnership approach was employed with the key aims of (1) quantifying rates of dental service utilisation, (2) identifying factors influencing participation, and (3) planning and establishing a program for delivery of Aboriginal children’s dental services that would increase participation and adapt to community needs. In planning the program, levels of participation were quantified and key issues identified through semistructured interviews. After 3.5 years, the participation rate for dental care among the target population increased from 53 to 70 percent. Key areas were identified to encourage further improvements and ensure sustainability in Aboriginal child oral health in this regional location.
Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating a Program to Address the Oral Health Needs of Aboriginal Children in Port Augusta, Australia
E. J. Parker,G. Misan,M. Shearer,L. Richards,A. Russell,H. Mills,L. M. Jamieson
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/496236
Abstract: Aboriginal Australian children experience profound oral health disparities relative to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. In response to community concerns regarding Aboriginal child oral health in the regional town of Port Augusta, South Australia, a child dental health service was established within a Community Controlled Aboriginal Health Service. A partnership approach was employed with the key aims of (1) quantifying rates of dental service utilisation, (2) identifying factors influencing participation, and (3) planning and establishing a program for delivery of Aboriginal children’s dental services that would increase participation and adapt to community needs. In planning the program, levels of participation were quantified and key issues identified through semistructured interviews. After 3.5 years, the participation rate for dental care among the target population increased from 53 to 70 percent. Key areas were identified to encourage further improvements and ensure sustainability in Aboriginal child oral health in this regional location. 1. Introduction In Australia the term “Aboriginal” is used to denote the indigenous inhabitants of the mainland, Tasmania, and several other adjacent islands. “Indigenous” includes Torres Strait Islanders, who account for 6 per cent of the total Indigenous population, with 4% identifying as being of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin [1]. The most recent information shows Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples represent 2.5 per cent of Australia’s population, or 517,000 people [1]. In 2006, 32% of Indigenous people were living in major cities, 43% in regional areas, 9% in remote areas, and 15% in very remote areas [1]. 1.1. Context Historically Australian Aboriginal groups experienced lesser rates of dental caries than the non-Aboriginal population. In more recent times, this prevalence has reversed, particularly in children. Since the late 1970s there has been a marked overall reduction in dental caries rates in Australian children, for both the deciduous and permanent dentitions [2]. However, these improvements are not distributed evenly across the population and are not as evident in socially disadvantaged groups [3]. In contrast to the Australian average, during this same period, the oral health status of Australian Aboriginal children has deteriorated. Aboriginal children suffer rates of decay between 2-3 times higher than their non-Aboriginal counterparts, experience severe early childhood caries almost twice as often as non-Aboriginal children, and have a greater proportion of
Self-management for obesity and cardio-metabolic fitness: Description and evaluation of the lifestyle modification program of a randomised controlled trial
Tahna L Pettman, Gary MH Misan, Katherine Owen, Kate Warren, Alison M Coates, Jonathan D Buckley, Peter RC Howe
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-5-53
Abstract: Overweight/obese adults (n = 153) with metabolic syndrome were recruited from the community and randomly allocated to intervention (INT) or control (CON). Written copies of Australian national dietary and PA guidelines were provided to all participants. INT took part in a 16-week lifestyle program which provided a curriculum and practical strategies on 1) dietary and PA information based on national guidelines, 2) behavioural self-management tools, 3) food-label reading, supermarkets tour and cooking, 4) exercise sessions, and 5) peer-group support. Compliance was assessed using attendance records and weekly food/PA logs. Participants' motivations, perceived benefits and goals were assessed through facilitated discussion. Program acceptability feedback was collected through structured focus groups.Although completion of weekly food/PA records was poor, attendance at information/education sessions (77% overall) and exercise participation (66% overall) was high, and compared with CON, multiple markers of body composition and cardio-metabolic health improved in INT. Participants reported that the most useful program components included food-label reading, cooking sessions, and learning new and different physical exercises, including home-based options. Participants also reported finding self-management techniques helpful, namely problem solving and short-term goal setting. The use of a group setting and supportive 'peer' leaders were found to be supportive. More frequent clinical assessment was suggested for future programs.This group-based lifestyle program achieved improvements in body composition and cardio-metabolic and physical fitness similar to individualised interventions which are more resource intensive to deliver. It confirmed that active training in lifestyle modification is more effective than passive provision of guidelines. Such programs should include social support and self-management techniques. Continued clinical follow up may be required for long-te
Abdominal adiposity and obstructive airway disease: testing insulin resistance and sleep disordered breathing mechanisms
Matthew T Haren, Gary Misan, Tracey-Jayne Paterson, Richard E Ruffin, Janet F Grant, Jonathan D Buckley, Peter RC Howe, Jonathan Newbury, Anne W Taylor, Robyn A McDermott
BMC Pulmonary Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2466-12-31
Abstract: A random sample of 2500 households was drawn from the community of Whyalla, South Australia (The Whyalla Intergenerational Study of Health, WISH February 2008 - July 2009). Seven-hundred twenty-two randomly selected adults (≥18?years) completed clinical protocols (32.2% response rate). Lung function was measured by spirometry. Post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC was used to measure airway obstruction and reversibility of FEV1 was calculated. Current asthma was defined by self-reported doctor-diagnosis and evidence of currently active asthma. Symptom scores for asthma (CASS) and SDB were calculated. Intra-abdominal fat (IAF) was estimated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). IR was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin concentrations.The prevalence of current doctor-diagnosed asthma was 19.9% (95% CI 16.7 – 23.5%). The ratio of observed to expected cases given the age and sex distribution of the population was 2.4 (95%CI 2.1, 2.9). IAF was not associated with current doctor-diagnosed asthma, FEV1/FVC or FEV1 reversibility in men or women but was positively associated with CASS independent of IR and SDB in women. A 1% increase in IAF was associated with decreases of 12?mL and 20?mL in FEV1 and FVC respectively in men, and 4?mL and 7?mL respectively in women. SDB mediated 12% and 26% of these associations respectively in men but had minimal effects in women.In this population with an excess of doctor-diagnosed asthma, IAF was not a major factor in airway obstruction or doctor-diagnosed asthma, although women with higher IAF perceived more severe asthma symptoms which did not correlate with lower FEV1. Higher IAF was significantly associated with lower FEV1 and FVC and in men SDB mechanisms may contribute up to one quarter of this association.Obesity, as defined by body mass index (BMI) has been shown to be associated with a 2.5-fold increase in the risk of current doctor-diagnosed asthma in women but not in men [1] and the association appears to be specific to
第1页/共7条
每页显示


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.